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Human risk from thermotolerant Campylobacter on broiler meat in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116265
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2013 Mar 15;162(2):129-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2013
Author
Louise Boysen
Maarten Nauta
Ana Sofia Ribeiro Duarte
Hanne Rosenquist
Author Affiliation
Technical University of Denmark, National Food Institute, Division for Epidemiology and Microbial Genomics, Moerkhoej Bygade 19B, 2860 Soeborg, Denmark. lobo@food.dtu.dk
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2013 Mar 15;162(2):129-34
Date
Mar-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Campylobacter - physiology
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Chickens
Denmark - epidemiology
Food Microbiology
Food Safety
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Temperature
Abstract
This paper describes a new approach by which changes over time in the relative risk of human campylobacteriosis from broiler meat are evaluated through quantitative microbiological risk assessment modelling. Danish surveillance data collected at retail from 2001 to 2010 on numbers of thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. on Danish produced and imported chilled and frozen broiler meat were the basis for the investigation. The aim was to explore if the risk from the different meat categories had changed over time as a consequence of implemented intervention strategies. The results showed a slight decrease from 2005 to 2008 in the human risk from Danish produced broiler meat, and a decrease from 2005 to 2010 in the risk from imported chilled meat. This risk reduction coincides with control measures implemented to reduce Campylobacter in Danish and imported chilled broiler meat. The human risk of campylobacteriosis from Danish frozen meat increased but remained lower compared to chilled meat. In total, the relative risk from broiler meat available for sale in Denmark increased from 2001 to 2005 after which the risk decreased to a level similar to the period 2001-2002. The use of QMRA in the evaluation of intervention strategies based on monitoring data provided an added value, compared to the traditional approach of only using changes in prevalence. The estimated human health risk is a function of prevalence and the distribution of concentrations, and therefore takes best usage of the available data, while providing the most relevant outcome for food safety risk managers.
PubMed ID
23416547 View in PubMed
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Learning from the past: Impact of the Arctic Oscillation on sea ice and marine productivity off northwest Greenland over the last 9,000 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304820
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2020 Dec; 26(12):6767-6786
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2020
Author
Audrey Limoges
Kaarina Weckström
Sofia Ribeiro
Eleanor Georgiadis
Katrine E Hansen
Philippe Martinez
Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
Jacques Giraudeau
Xavier Crosta
Guillaume Massé
Author Affiliation
Department of Earth Sciences, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2020 Dec; 26(12):6767-6786
Date
Dec-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Climate warming is rapidly reshaping the Arctic cryosphere and ocean conditions, with consequences for sea ice and pelagic productivity patterns affecting the entire marine food web. To predict how ongoing changes will impact Arctic marine ecosystems, concerted effort from various disciplines is required. Here, we contribute multi-decadal reconstructions of changes in diatom production and sea-ice conditions in relation to Holocene climate and ocean conditions off northwest Greenland. Our multiproxy study includes diatoms, sea-ice biomarkers (IP25 and HBI III) and geochemical tracers (TOC [total organic carbon], TOC:TN [total nitrogen], d13 C, d15 N) from a sediment core record spanning the last c. 9,000 years. Our results suggest that the balance between the outflow of polar water from the Arctic, and input of Atlantic water from the Irminger Current into the West Greenland Current is a key factor in controlling sea-ice conditions, and both diatom phenology and production in northeastern Baffin Bay. Our proxy record notably shows that changes in sea-surface conditions initially forced by Neoglacial cooling were dynamically amplified by the shift in the dominant phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) mode that occurred at c. 3,000 yr BP, and caused drastic changes in community composition and a decline in diatom production at the study site. In the future, with projected dominant-positive AO conditions favored by Arctic warming, increased water column stratification may counteract the positive effect of a longer open-water growth season and negatively impact diatom production.
PubMed ID
32885894 View in PubMed
Less detail

Learning from the past: Impact of the Arctic Oscillation on sea ice and marine productivity off northwest Greenland over the last 9,000 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311556
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2020 Dec; 26(12):6767-6786
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2020
Author
Audrey Limoges
Kaarina Weckström
Sofia Ribeiro
Eleanor Georgiadis
Katrine E Hansen
Philippe Martinez
Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
Jacques Giraudeau
Xavier Crosta
Guillaume Massé
Author Affiliation
Department of Earth Sciences, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2020 Dec; 26(12):6767-6786
Date
Dec-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Ecosystem
Food chain
Greenland
Ice Cover
Abstract
Climate warming is rapidly reshaping the Arctic cryosphere and ocean conditions, with consequences for sea ice and pelagic productivity patterns affecting the entire marine food web. To predict how ongoing changes will impact Arctic marine ecosystems, concerted effort from various disciplines is required. Here, we contribute multi-decadal reconstructions of changes in diatom production and sea-ice conditions in relation to Holocene climate and ocean conditions off northwest Greenland. Our multiproxy study includes diatoms, sea-ice biomarkers (IP25 and HBI III) and geochemical tracers (TOC [total organic carbon], TOC:TN [total nitrogen], d13 C, d15 N) from a sediment core record spanning the last c. 9,000 years. Our results suggest that the balance between the outflow of polar water from the Arctic, and input of Atlantic water from the Irminger Current into the West Greenland Current is a key factor in controlling sea-ice conditions, and both diatom phenology and production in northeastern Baffin Bay. Our proxy record notably shows that changes in sea-surface conditions initially forced by Neoglacial cooling were dynamically amplified by the shift in the dominant phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) mode that occurred at c. 3,000 yr BP, and caused drastic changes in community composition and a decline in diatom production at the study site. In the future, with projected dominant-positive AO conditions favored by Arctic warming, increased water column stratification may counteract the positive effect of a longer open-water growth season and negatively impact diatom production.
PubMed ID
32885894 View in PubMed
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Sea ice and primary production proxies in surface sediments from a High Arctic Greenland fjord: Spatial distribution and implications for palaeoenvironmental studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279550
Source
Ambio. 2017 Feb;46(Suppl 1):106-118
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Sofia Ribeiro
Mikael K Sejr
Audrey Limoges
Maija Heikkilä
Thorbjørn Joest Andersen
Petra Tallberg
Kaarina Weckström
Katrine Husum
Matthias Forwick
Tage Dalsgaard
Guillaume Massé
Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz
Søren Rysgaard
Source
Ambio. 2017 Feb;46(Suppl 1):106-118
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In order to establish a baseline for proxy-based reconstructions for the Young Sound-Tyrolerfjord system (Northeast Greenland), we analysed the spatial distribution of primary production and sea ice proxies in surface sediments from the fjord, against monitoring data from the Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring Programme. Clear spatial gradients in organic carbon and biogenic silica contents reflected marine influence, nutrient availability and river-induced turbidity, in good agreement with in situ measurements. The sea ice proxy IP25 was detected at all sites but at low concentrations, indicating that IP25 records from fjords need to be carefully considered and not directly compared to marine settings. The sea ice-associated biomarker HBI III revealed an open-water signature, with highest concentrations near the mid-July ice edge. This proxy evaluation is an important step towards reliable palaeoenvironmental reconstructions that will, ultimately, contribute to better predictions for this High Arctic ecosystem in a warming climate.
PubMed ID
28116686 View in PubMed
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Size differences of Arctic marine protists between two climate periods-using the paleoecological record to assess the importance of within-species trait variation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279059
Source
Ecol Evol. 2017 Jan;7(1):3-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Erik A Mousing
Sofia Ribeiro
Chelsea Chisholm
Antoon Kuijpers
Matthias Moros
Marianne Ellegaard
Source
Ecol Evol. 2017 Jan;7(1):3-13
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Mean body size decreases with increasing temperature in a variety of organisms. This size-temperature relationship has generally been tested through space but rarely through time. We analyzed the sedimentary archive of dinoflagellate cysts in a sediment record taken from the West Greenland shelf and show that mean cell size decreased at both intra- and interspecific scales in a period of relatively warm temperatures, compared with a period of relatively cold temperatures. We further show that intraspecific changes accounted for more than 70% of the change in community mean size, whereas shifts in species composition only accounted for about 30% of the observed change. Literature values on size ranges and midpoints for individual taxa were in several cases not representative for the measured sizes, although changes in community mean size, calculated from literature values, did capture the direction of change. While the results show that intraspecific variation is necessary to accurately estimate the magnitude of change in protist community mean size, it may be possible to investigate general patterns, that is relative size differences, using interspecific-level estimates.
PubMed ID
28070270 View in PubMed
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