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Effect of cold on blood clearance of carbon and bacteria of different virulence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298773
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-14. 14 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 1965
  1 document  
Author
Berry, L. Joe
Smythe, Dorothy S.
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Biology, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-14. 14 p.
Date
January 1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1147370
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Mice
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Blood
Carbon
Salmonella typhimurium
Livers
Abstract
Mice singly housed without bedding at 5° C clear carbon from the blood more slowly than animals similarly housed at 25° C. Increasing the time of exposure to cold to 2, 18 or 72 hours does not further alter the rate of clearance. Bacteria are also "cleared" uniformly at the two temperatures when a highly virulent strain (SR-11) of Salmonella typhimurium is injected intravenously, but not when one of low virulence (RIA) is used. The RIA strain disappears from blood more slowly in mice at 5° C than in those at 25° C. This was demonstrated both by dilution counts and by labeling the bacteria with p32 and following the decline in radioactivity of blood with time. Livers of mice were sampled at times postinfection for radioactivity and for viable bacterial counts. Housing temperature had no effect on radioactivity changes, but viable counts were higher and decreased more slowly in mice at 5° C than at 25° C. These findings are believed to account, in part, for the greater susceptibility to infection with RIA that was previously seen in mice exposed to cold compared to those at 25° C.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.64-14
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Enzyme induction and cortisone protection in endotoxin-poisoned mice at 25° C compared with that at 5° C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298769
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-8. 17 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
January 1965
  1 document  
Author
Berry, L. Joe
Smythe, Dorothy S.
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Biology, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-8. 17 p.
Date
January 1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1650243
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Mice
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Endotoxin
Cortisone
Liver
Abstract
Mice housed at 25° C are protected by cortisone against endotoxin lethality when the hormone is given at the same time as the poison, but not an hour or two later. This is not true of mice housed at 5° C. Activity of liver tryptophan pyrrolase is lowered by endotoxin and elevated by cortisone only in animals at normal temperatures. When endotoxin and hormone are given concurrently, normal enzyme activity is maintained, but activity decreases when the hormone injection is given an hour or more after endotoxin. Actinomycin D, ethionine, 2-thiouracil, and 8-azaguanine (inhibitors of protein synthesis) when given in sublethal amount: potentiate endotoxin, prevent cortisone protection against endotoxin, and block the hormonal induction of tryptophan pyrrolase. Chloramphenicol has none of these effects. Mice infected with Salmonella typhimurium have lower than normal tryptophan pyrrolase activity and a smaller induction of enzyme by cortisone 18 hours postinfection than do normal mice or mice 42 hours postinfection. This occurs only at 25° C.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.64-8
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