Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Genetics redraws pelagic biogeography of Calanus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292203
Source
Biol Lett. 2017 Dec; 13(12):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Marvin Choquet
Maja Hatlebakk
Anusha K S Dhanasiri
Ksenia Kosobokova
Irina Smolina
Janne E Søreide
Camilla Svensen
Webjørn Melle
Slawomir Kwasniewski
Ketil Eiane
Malin Daase
Vigdis Tverberg
Stig Skreslet
Ann Bucklin
Galice Hoarau
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Biosciences and Aquaculture, Nord University, 8049 Bodø, Norway marvin.choquet@nord.no.
Source
Biol Lett. 2017 Dec; 13(12):
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Atlantic Ocean
Copepoda - anatomy & histology - classification - genetics
Genetic markers
INDEL Mutation
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Planktonic copepods of the genus Calanus play a central role in North Atlantic/Arctic marine food webs. Here, using molecular markers, we redrew the distributional ranges of Calanus species inhabiting the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans and revealed much wider and more broadly overlapping distributions than previously described. The Arctic shelf species, C. glacialis, dominated the zooplankton assemblage of many Norwegian fjords, where only C. finmarchicus has been reported previously. In these fjords, high occurrences of the Arctic species C. hyperboreus were also found. Molecular markers revealed that the most common method of species identification, prosome length, cannot reliably discriminate the species in Norwegian fjords. Differences in degree of genetic differentiation among fjord populations of the two species suggested that C. glacialis is a more permanent resident of the fjords than C. finmarchicus We found no evidence of hybridization between the species. Our results indicate a critical need for the wider use of molecular markers to reliably identify and discriminate these morphologically similar copepod species, which serve as important indicators of climate responses.
Notes
Cites: Science. 2002 May 31;296(5573):1692-4 PMID 12040196
Cites: Nature. 2003 Dec 11;426(6967):661-4 PMID 14668864
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2009 Jan 22;276(1655):301-7 PMID 18812293
Cites: Mol Ecol Resour. 2014 Sep;14(5):1072-9 PMID 24612683
Cites: Evolution. 1984 Nov;38(6):1358-1370 PMID 28563791
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2005 Jun;20(6):337-44 PMID 16701390
PubMed ID
29263132 View in PubMed
Less detail

Genetics redraws pelagic biogeography of Calanus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287749
Source
Biol Lett. 2017 Dec;13(12)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Marvin Choquet
Maja Hatlebakk
Anusha K S Dhanasiri
Ksenia Kosobokova
Irina Smolina
Janne E Søreide
Camilla Svensen
Webjørn Melle
Slawomir Kwasniewski
Ketil Eiane
Malin Daase
Vigdis Tverberg
Stig Skreslet
Ann Bucklin
Galice Hoarau
Source
Biol Lett. 2017 Dec;13(12)
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Planktonic copepods of the genus Calanus play a central role in North Atlantic/Arctic marine food webs. Here, using molecular markers, we redrew the distributional ranges of Calanus species inhabiting the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans and revealed much wider and more broadly overlapping distributions than previously described. The Arctic shelf species, C. glacialis, dominated the zooplankton assemblage of many Norwegian fjords, where only C. finmarchicus has been reported previously. In these fjords, high occurrences of the Arctic species C. hyperboreus were also found. Molecular markers revealed that the most common method of species identification, prosome length, cannot reliably discriminate the species in Norwegian fjords. Differences in degree of genetic differentiation among fjord populations of the two species suggested that C. glacialis is a more permanent resident of the fjords than C. finmarchicus We found no evidence of hybridization between the species. Our results indicate a critical need for the wider use of molecular markers to reliably identify and discriminate these morphologically similar copepod species, which serve as important indicators of climate responses.
PubMed ID
29263132 View in PubMed
Less detail

Leads in Arctic pack ice enable early phytoplankton blooms below snow-covered sea ice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279277
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 Jan 19;7:40850
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-19-2017
Author
Philipp Assmy
Mar Fernández-Méndez
Pedro Duarte
Amelie Meyer
Achim Randelhoff
Christopher J Mundy
Lasse M Olsen
Hanna M Kauko
Allison Bailey
Melissa Chierici
Lana Cohen
Anthony P Doulgeris
Jens K Ehn
Agneta Fransson
Sebastian Gerland
Haakon Hop
Stephen R Hudson
Nick Hughes
Polona Itkin
Geir Johnsen
Jennifer A King
Boris P Koch
Zoe Koenig
Slawomir Kwasniewski
Samuel R Laney
Marcel Nicolaus
Alexey K Pavlov
Christopher M Polashenski
Christine Provost
Anja Rösel
Marthe Sandbu
Gunnar Spreen
Lars H Smedsrud
Arild Sundfjord
Torbjørn Taskjelle
Agnieszka Tatarek
Jozef Wiktor
Penelope M Wagner
Anette Wold
Harald Steen
Mats A Granskog
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 Jan 19;7:40850
Date
Jan-19-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The Arctic icescape is rapidly transforming from a thicker multiyear ice cover to a thinner and largely seasonal first-year ice cover with significant consequences for Arctic primary production. One critical challenge is to understand how productivity will change within the next decades. Recent studies have reported extensive phytoplankton blooms beneath ponded sea ice during summer, indicating that satellite-based Arctic annual primary production estimates may be significantly underestimated. Here we present a unique time-series of a phytoplankton spring bloom observed beneath snow-covered Arctic pack ice. The bloom, dominated by the haptophyte algae Phaeocystis pouchetii, caused near depletion of the surface nitrate inventory and a decline in dissolved inorganic carbon by 16?±?6?g?C m(-2). Ocean circulation characteristics in the area indicated that the bloom developed in situ despite the snow-covered sea ice. Leads in the dynamic ice cover provided added sunlight necessary to initiate and sustain the bloom. Phytoplankton blooms beneath snow-covered ice might become more common and widespread in the future Arctic Ocean with frequent lead formation due to thinner and more dynamic sea ice despite projected increases in high-Arctic snowfall. This could alter productivity, marine food webs and carbon sequestration in the Arctic Ocean.
PubMed ID
28102329 View in PubMed
Less detail

Leads in Arctic pack ice enable early phytoplankton blooms below snow-covered sea ice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295655
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 01 19; 7:40850
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-19-2017
Author
Philipp Assmy
Mar Fernández-Méndez
Pedro Duarte
Amelie Meyer
Achim Randelhoff
Christopher J Mundy
Lasse M Olsen
Hanna M Kauko
Allison Bailey
Melissa Chierici
Lana Cohen
Anthony P Doulgeris
Jens K Ehn
Agneta Fransson
Sebastian Gerland
Haakon Hop
Stephen R Hudson
Nick Hughes
Polona Itkin
Geir Johnsen
Jennifer A King
Boris P Koch
Zoe Koenig
Slawomir Kwasniewski
Samuel R Laney
Marcel Nicolaus
Alexey K Pavlov
Christopher M Polashenski
Christine Provost
Anja Rösel
Marthe Sandbu
Gunnar Spreen
Lars H Smedsrud
Arild Sundfjord
Torbjørn Taskjelle
Agnieszka Tatarek
Jozef Wiktor
Penelope M Wagner
Anette Wold
Harald Steen
Mats A Granskog
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, 9296 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 01 19; 7:40850
Date
01-19-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Carbon Compounds, Inorganic - analysis
Eutrophication
Haptophyta - growth & development
Ice Cover
Nitrates - analysis
Phytoplankton - growth & development
Satellite Imagery
Seasons
Abstract
The Arctic icescape is rapidly transforming from a thicker multiyear ice cover to a thinner and largely seasonal first-year ice cover with significant consequences for Arctic primary production. One critical challenge is to understand how productivity will change within the next decades. Recent studies have reported extensive phytoplankton blooms beneath ponded sea ice during summer, indicating that satellite-based Arctic annual primary production estimates may be significantly underestimated. Here we present a unique time-series of a phytoplankton spring bloom observed beneath snow-covered Arctic pack ice. The bloom, dominated by the haptophyte algae Phaeocystis pouchetii, caused near depletion of the surface nitrate inventory and a decline in dissolved inorganic carbon by 16?±?6?g?C m-2. Ocean circulation characteristics in the area indicated that the bloom developed in situ despite the snow-covered sea ice. Leads in the dynamic ice cover provided added sunlight necessary to initiate and sustain the bloom. Phytoplankton blooms beneath snow-covered ice might become more common and widespread in the future Arctic Ocean with frequent lead formation due to thinner and more dynamic sea ice despite projected increases in high-Arctic snowfall. This could alter productivity, marine food webs and carbon sequestration in the Arctic Ocean.
Notes
Cites: Science. 2012 Jun 15;336(6087):1408 PMID 22678359
Cites: New Phytol. 2015 Jul;207(1):159-71 PMID 25708812
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Feb 19;11(2):e0148512 PMID 26895333
Cites: PLoS One. 2009 Nov 03;4(11):e7743 PMID 19888450
Cites: Nature. 2014 May 22;509(7501):479-82 PMID 24805239
PubMed ID
28102329 View in PubMed
Less detail

Supplementary diet components of little auk chicks in two contrasting regions on the West Spitsbergen coast.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263662
Source
Polar Biol. 2015;38(2):261-267
Publication Type
Article
Author
Rafal Boehnke
Marta Gluchowska
Katarzyna Wojczulanis-Jakubas
Dariusz Jakubas
Nina J Karnovsky
Wojciech Walkusz
Slawomir Kwasniewski
Katarzyna Blachowiak-Samolyk
Source
Polar Biol. 2015;38(2):261-267
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The complete diet composition structure of the most numerous planktivorous sea bird, little auk (Alle alle), in the European Arctic, is still not fully recognized. Although regular constituents of little auk chick diets, the copepods, Calanus glacialis and C. finmarchicus have been previously relatively well described, more taxa were frequent ingredients of the bird's meals. Therefore, the role of the little auks supplementary diet components (SDCs) at two colonies in the Svalbard Archipelago, Hornsund and Magdalenefjorden, in 2007-2009, is a main subject of this comparative study. Because the SDCs often consisted of scarce but large zooplankters, this investigation was focused on biomass as a proxy of the SDCs' energy input. Although the total biomass of the food delivered to chicks in both colonies was similar, in Magdalenefjorden, the proportion of SDCs was twice that found in Hornsund. The main SDCs in Hornsund were Decapoda larvae (with predominating Pagurus pubescens) and Thysanoessa inermis, whereas the main SDCs in Magdalenefjorden were C. hyperboreus and Apherusa glacialis. Previous investigations, which indicated lipid richness of SDCs, together with our ecological results from the colonies, suggest that this category might play a compensatory role in little auk chick diets. The ability to forage on diverse taxa may help the birds to adapt to ongoing Arctic ecosystem changes.
PubMed ID
26069395 View in PubMed
Less detail

Variations in the structural and functional diversity of zooplankton over vertical and horizontal environmental gradients en route to the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279849
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(2):e0171715
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Marta Gluchowska
Emilia Trudnowska
Ilona Goszczko
Anna Maria Kubiszyn
Katarzyna Blachowiak-Samolyk
Waldemar Walczowski
Slawomir Kwasniewski
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(2):e0171715
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A multi-scale approach was used to evaluate which spatial gradient of environmental variability is the most important in structuring zooplankton diversity in the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC). The WSC is the main conveyor of warm and biologically rich Atlantic water to the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait. The data set included 85 stratified vertical zooplankton samples (obtained from depths up to 1000 metres) covering two latitudinal sections (76°30'N and 79°N) located across the multi-path WSC system. The results indicate that the most important environmental variables shaping the zooplankton structural and functional diversity and standing stock variability are those associated with depth, whereas variables acting in the horizontal dimension are of lesser importance. Multivariate analysis of the zooplankton assemblages, together with different univariate descriptors of zooplankton diversity, clearly illustrated the segregation of zooplankton taxa in the vertical plane. The epipelagic zone (upper 200 m) hosted plentiful, Oithona similis-dominated assemblages with a high proportion of filter-feeding zooplankton. Although total zooplankton abundance declined in the mesopelagic zone (200-1000 m), zooplankton assemblages in that zone were more diverse and more evenly distributed, with high contributions from both herbivorous and carnivorous taxa. The vertical distribution of integrated biomass (mg DW m-2) indicated that the total zooplankton biomass in the epipelagic and mesopelagic zones was comparable. Environmental gradients acting in the horizontal plane, such as the ones associated with different ice cover and timing of the spring bloom, were reflected in the latitudinal variability in protist community structure and probably caused differences in succession in the zooplankton community. High abundances of Calanus finmarchicus in the WSC core branch suggest the existence of mechanisms advantageous for higher productivity or/and responsible for physical concentration of zooplankton. Our results indicate that regional hydrography plays a primary role in shaping zooplankton variability in the WSC on the way to the Arctic Ocean, with additional effects caused by biological factors related to seasonality in pelagic ecosystem development, resulting in regional differences in food availability or biological production between the continental slope and the deep ocean regions.
PubMed ID
28178320 View in PubMed
Less detail

Warming of Subarctic waters accelerates development of a key marine zooplankton Calanus finmarchicus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295418
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 01; 24(1):172-183
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Agata Weydmann
Waldemar Walczowski
Jacob Carstensen
Slawomir Kwasniewski
Author Affiliation
Department of Marine Plankton Research, Institute of Oceanography, University of Gdansk, Gdynia, Poland.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 01; 24(1):172-183
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Copepoda - growth & development
Food chain
Oceans and Seas
Seasons
Temperature
Zooplankton
Abstract
Recent observations confirm the rising temperatures of Atlantic waters transported into the Arctic Ocean via the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC). We studied the overall abundance and population structure of the North Atlantic keystone zooplankton copepod Calanus finmarchicus, which is the main prey for pelagic fish and some seabirds, in relation to selected environmental variables in this area between 2001 and 2011, when warming in the Arctic and Subarctic was particularly pronounced. Sampling within a 3-week time window each summer demonstrated that trends in the overall abundance of C. finmarchicus varied between years, with the highest values in "extreme" years, due to high numbers of nauplii and early copepodite stages in colder years (2001, 2004, 2010), and contrary to that, the fifth copepodite stage (C5) peaking in warm years (2006, 2007, 2009). The most influential environmental variable driving C. finmarchicus life cycle was temperature, which promoted an increased C5 abundance when the temperature was above 6°C, indicating earlier spawning and/or accelerated development, and possibly leading to their development to adults later in the summer and spawning for the second time, given adequate food supply. Based on the presented high interannual and spatial variability, we hypothesize that under a warmer climate, C. finmarchicus may annually produce two generations in the southern part of the WSC, what in turn could lead to food web reorganization of important top predators, such as little auks, and induce northward migrations of fish, especially the Norwegian herring.
PubMed ID
28801968 View in PubMed
Less detail

Warming of Subarctic waters accelerates development of a key marine zooplankton Calanus finmarchicus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285041
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 Aug 12;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-12-2017
Author
Agata Weydmann
Waldemar Walczowski
Jacob Carstensen
Slawomir Kwasniewski
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 Aug 12;
Date
Aug-12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Recent observations confirm the rising temperatures of Atlantic waters transported into the Arctic Ocean via the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC). We studied the overall abundance and population structure of the North Atlantic keystone zooplankton copepod Calanus finmarchicus, which is the main prey for pelagic fish and some seabirds, in relation to selected environmental variables in this area between 2001 and 2011, when warming in the Arctic and Subarctic was particularly pronounced. Sampling within a 3-week time window each summer demonstrated that trends in the overall abundance of C. finmarchicus varied between years, with the highest values in "extreme" years, due to high numbers of nauplii and early copepodite stages in colder years (2001, 2004, 2010), and contrary to that, the fifth copepodite stage (C5) peaking in warm years (2006, 2007, 2009). The most influential environmental variable driving C. finmarchicus life cycle was temperature, which promoted an increased C5 abundance when the temperature was above 6°C, indicating earlier spawning and/or accelerated development, and possibly leading to their development to adults later in the summer and spawning for the second time, given adequate food supply. Based on the presented high interannual and spatial variability, we hypothesize that under a warmer climate, C. finmarchicus may annually produce two generations in the southern part of the WSC, what in turn could lead to food web reorganization of important top predators, such as little auks, and induce northward migrations of fish, especially the Norwegian herring.
PubMed ID
28801968 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.