Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Chronic pain and other sequelae in long-term breast cancer survivors: Nationwide survey in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85728
Source
Eur J Pain. 2008 Jul 15;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2008
Author
PeuckmannV.
EkholmO.
RasmussenN K
GroenvoldM.
ChristiansenP.
MøllerS.
EriksenJ.
SjøgrenP.
Author Affiliation
Multidisciplinary Pain Centre, University Hospital Rigshospitalet 7612, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark; Department of Anaesthesiology and Department of Palliative Medicine, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany.
Source
Eur J Pain. 2008 Jul 15;
Date
Jul-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate self-reported chronic pain and other sequelae in a nationally representative sample of long-term breast cancer survivors (BCS). DESIGN: Age-stratified random sample of 2,000 female BCS 5 years after primary surgery without recurrence drawn from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, which is representative regarding long-term BCS in Denmark. ASSESSMENT: Self-administered questionnaire including questions on sociodemography, chronic pain (6 months), health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and other sequelae related to breast cancer. Associations with treatment were investigated. Report of chronic pain was compared to normative data. RESULTS: The response rate was 79%. Chronic pain prevalence of 42% was significantly higher in BCS compared to general population women (SRR: 1.32; 95% CI: 1.23-1.42). Sequelae related to breast cancer were paraesthesia 47%, chronic pain 29%, arm/shoulder swelling 25%, phantom sensations 19%, and allodynia 15%. Chronic pain related to breast cancer was significantly associated with poorer HRQOL and higher medicine consumption, and, in multiple logistic regression analysis, with age (
PubMed ID
18635381 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pain management of opioid-treated cancer patients in hospital settings in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84438
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2007 Nov 13;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-13-2007
Author
LundorffL.
PeuckmannV.
SjøgrenP.
Author Affiliation
Department of Palliative Care, Herning Hospital, Herning, Denmark.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2007 Nov 13;
Date
Nov-13-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Aim: To evaluate the performance and quality of cancer pain management in hospital settings. Methods: Anaesthesiologists specialised in pain and palliative medicine studied pain management in departments of oncology and surgery. Study days were randomly chosen and patients treated with oral opioids were included. Information regarding pain aetiology and mechanisms, pain medications and opioid side effects were registered from the medical records and by examining patients. Pain intensity was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Results: In total, 59 cancer patients were included. In 49 (83%) patients pain aetiology was assessed by the physicians of the departments of oncology and surgery. In only 19 (32%) patients they assessed pain mechanisms. The median oral morphine dose was 120 mg/day (range: 10-720 mg/day). Seventy-eight per cent of patients received opioids at adequate regular intervals according to the duration of action. In 88% of the patients supplemental short-acting oral opioids were given on demand and the median supplemental oral dose was 16.5% of the daily dose. Seven patients with neuropathic pain received adjuvant drugs, whereas six patients with non-neuropathic pain received adjuvant drugs. Regarding opioid side effects only constipation and nausea were treated in the majority of the patients. Average pain intensity in the last 24 h for the total number of patients (n=59)
PubMed ID
18005379 View in PubMed
Less detail