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Adherence to physical activity recommendations and the influence of socio-demographic correlates - a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91546
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:367
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Bergman Patrick
Grjibovski Andrej M
Hagströmer Maria
Bauman Adrian
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, 141 57 Huddinge, Sweden. patrick.bergman@ki.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:367
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Current physical activity guidelines acknowledge the importance of total health enhancing physical activity (HEPA) compared to leisure time physical activity or exercise alone. Assessing total HEPA may result in different levels of adherence to these as well as the strength and/or direction of associations observed between total HEPA and socio-demographic correlates. The aim of this study was to estimate the proportion of the population adhering to the recommendation of at least 30 minutes of HEPA on most days, and to examine the influences of socio-demographic correlates on reaching this recommendation. METHODS: Swedish adults aged 18-74 years (n = 1470) were categorized, based on population data obtained using the IPAQ, into low, moderately and highly physically active categories. Independent associations between the physical activity categories and socio-demographic correlates were studied using a multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS: Of the subjects, 63% (95% CI: 60.5-65.4) adhered to the HEPA recommendation. Most likely to reach the highly physical active category were those aged
PubMed ID
18945354 View in PubMed
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Association of common variants of UCP2 gene with low-grade inflammation in Swedish children and adolescents; the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95214
Source
Pediatr Res. 2009 Sep;66(3):350-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Labayen Idoia
Ortega Francisco B
Sjöström Michael
Nilsson Torbjörn K
Olsson Lovisa A
Ruiz Jonatan R
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria 01006, Spain. idoia.labayen@ehu.es
Source
Pediatr Res. 2009 Sep;66(3):350-4
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Biological Markers - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Child
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Inflammation - genetics
Ion Channels - genetics
Male
Mitochondrial Proteins - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
We examined the associations of two functional variants 866G>A and DEL/INS polymorphisms of UCP2 gene with low-grade inflammatory proteins (C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, complement C3 [C3], and complement C4 [C4]) in 131 children (52.7% boys, aged 9.5 +/- 0.4 y) and 118 adolescents (44.1% males, aged 15.5 +/- 0.4 y) selected from the European Youth Heart Study. Differences in inflammatory markers among the genotype variants of the two UCP2 gene polymorphisms were analyzed after adjusting for sex, age, pubertal stage, fitness, and fatness. The results showed that fibrinogen, C3, and C4 were higher in GG carriers than in subjects carrying the A allele of the 866G>A polymorphism of the UCP2 gene (UCP2 -866G>A) polymorphism (all p A in modifying low-grade inflammatory state in apparently healthy children and adolescents. Given the implication of complement factors on atherosclerosis process, these results contribute to explain the reduced cardiovascular risk associated with the A allele of the UCP2 -866G>A polymorphism.
PubMed ID
19531977 View in PubMed
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Association of total plasma homocysteine with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotypes 677C>T, 1298A>C, and 1793G>A and the corresponding haplotypes in Swedish children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78582
Source
Int J Mol Med. 2007 Apr;19(4):659-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Böttiger Anna K
Hurtig-Wennlöf Anita
Sjöström Michael
Yngve Agneta
Nilsson Torbjörn K
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Orebro University Hospital, SE-701 85 Orebro, Sweden. anna.bottiger@orebroll.se
Source
Int J Mol Med. 2007 Apr;19(4):659-65
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Genotype
Haplotypes
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Male
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2) - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Sweden
Abstract
We studied 692 Swedish children and adolescents (aged 9-10 or 15-16 years, respectively), in order to evaluate the effect of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T, 1298A>C, and 1793G>A polymorphisms on total plasma homocysteine concentrations (tHcy). Genotyping was performed with Pyrosequencing technology. The MTHFR 677C>T polymorphism was associated with increased tHcy concentrations in both the children and the adolescents (PC was studied separately in subjects with the 677CC and 677CT genotypes, and the 1298C allele was found to be associated with higher tHcy levels both when children were stratified according to 677C>T genotypes, and when using haplotype analyses and diplotype reconstructions. The 1793A allele was in complete linkage disequilibrium with the 1298C allele. It was still possible to show that the 1793A allele was associated with lower tHcy levels, statistically significant in the adolescents. In conclusion, a haplotype-based approach was slightly superior in explaining the genetic interaction on tHcy plasma levels in children and adolescents than a simple genotype based approach (R2 adj 0.44 vs. 0.40). The major genetic impact on tHcy concentrations is attributable to the MTHFR 677C>T polymorphism. The common 1298A>C polymorphism had a minor elevating effect on tHcy, whereas the 1793G>A polymorphism had a lowering effect on tHcy.
PubMed ID
17334642 View in PubMed
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Associations between physical activity, body fat, and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment) in adolescents: the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93501
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Mar;87(3):586-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Rizzo Nico S
Ruiz Jonatan R
Oja Leila
Veidebaum Tomas
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. nico.rizzo@biosci.ki.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Mar;87(3):586-92
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body Composition - physiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estonia - epidemiology
Exercise - physiology
Fasting - blood
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Linear Models
Male
Obesity - metabolism - prevention & control
Physical Fitness - physiology
Skinfold thickness
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: More and better data are needed to understand the action of physical activity (PA) on insulin resistance and the concomitant relation with body fat in adolescence. OBJECTIVE: We examined the relation between total PA and intensity levels with insulin resistance under special consideration of waist circumference and skinfold thickness. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study of 613 adolescents (352 girls, 261 boys) with a mean (+/-SD) age of 15.5 +/- 0.5 y from Sweden and Estonia. Total, low, moderate, and vigorous PA was measured by accelerometry. Body fat estimators included waist circumference and the sum of 5 skinfold thicknesses. Fasting insulin and glucose were measured, and insulin resistance was calculated according to the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Linear regression analysis and analysis of covariance were used to determine the association between PA and insulin resistance while considering body fat. All estimates were adjusted for sex, country, pubertal status, and indicators of body fat when applicable. RESULTS: Total, moderate, and vigorous PA were inversely correlated with HOMA. Body fat estimators were positively correlated with HOMA. Significant contrasts in HOMA concentrations were seen when comparing the lower 2 tertiles with the upper tertile of PA indicators. Repeating the analysis with body fat estimators showed significant contrasts in HOMA concentrations when comparing the lower tertiles with the upper tertile. CONCLUSION: In view of an increase in obesity in young people, the results accentuate the role of PA in sustaining metabolic balance in adolescence and the potential benefit of an increase of time spent at higher PA levels for youth with relatively elevated amounts of body fat.
PubMed ID
18326595 View in PubMed
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Body fat is associated with blood pressure in school-aged girls with low cardiorespiratory fitness: the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84901
Source
J Hypertens. 2007 Oct;25(10):2027-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Ruiz Jonatan R
Ortega Francisco B
Loit Helle M
Veidebaum Toomas
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. ruizj@ugr.es
Source
J Hypertens. 2007 Oct;25(10):2027-34
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adiposity - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estonia
Europe
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Physical Fitness - physiology
Skinfold thickness
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between anthropometric measurements of total and central adiposity and blood pressure in school-aged children, and to study whether these associations are modified by the levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. METHODS: Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, weight, height, skinfold thickness and waist circumference were measured in 873 children aged 9-10 years participating in the Estonian and Swedish part of the European Youth Heart Study. Mean arterial pressure was calculated. Body mass index and skinfold thickness were used as markers of total adiposity, whereas waist circumference and waist-height ratio were used as markers of central adiposity. Cardiorespiratory fitness was estimated by a maximal ergometer bike test, and dichotomized into low and high levels. RESULTS: Markers of total and central adiposity were positively associated with blood pressure. The results from the regression models showed that the markers of total and central adiposity were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure in girls with low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. Similar results were observed when mean arterial pressure was the outcome variable. None of the markers of total and central adiposity were significantly associated with blood pressure in girls with high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness or in boys with low or high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness. CONCLUSIONS: The results show a positive influence of simple anthropometric measurements of total and central adiposity on blood pressure, and suggest that higher cardiorespiratory fitness may attenuate the association between body fat and blood pressure in school-aged children.
PubMed ID
17885544 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular fitness in adolescents: the influence of sexual maturation status-the AVENA and EYHS studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85224
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Nov-Dec;19(6):801-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ortega Francisco B
Ruiz Jonatan R
Mesa Jose L
Gutiérrez Angel
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, 14157 Huddinge, Sweden. ortegaf@ugr.es
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Nov-Dec;19(6):801-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutrition Physiology
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body Weight
Cardiovascular System
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sexual Maturation - physiology
Skinfold thickness
Spain
Sweden
Abstract
The purposes were: (1) to determine the influence of sexual maturation status and body composition by comparing cardiovascular fitness (CVF) level in two adolescent populations from the south and the north of Europe; (2) to describe the associations between CVF and sexual maturation status in adolescence. A total of 1,867 Spanish adolescents from the AVENA study and 472 from the Swedish part of the EYHS were selected for this report (aged 14-16 years). CVF (expressed by the maximal oxygen consumption) was estimated from 20 m shuttle run test in the AVENA study and from a maximal ergometer cycle test in the EYHS. Sexual maturation status was classified according to Tanner stages. Body fat percentage (BF%) was estimated from skinfold thicknesses. Expressing CVF in different ways (in absolute value and in relation to weight or fat free mass; FFM) resulted in two different results with regard to CVF interpretation and comparison between the study populations. A higher CVF, as expressed in relation to FFM, was observed in the Spanish when compared to Swedish adolescents (P = 0.001). However, after adjusting for both sexual maturation status and BF%, the difference disappeared in males, while it remained significant in females (P = 0.001). CVF was negatively associated with sexual maturation status in males (P = 0.001). However, after adjusting for BF%, the association disappeared in males, while it was significant in females (P = 0.05). These results suggest that for CVF comparisons and interpretation in adolescent populations, sexual maturation status and BF%, as well as the way to express the CVF, should be taken into account.
PubMed ID
17712790 View in PubMed
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Central adiposity in 9- and 15-year-old Swedish children from the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92825
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2008;3(4):212-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Ortega Francisco B
Ruiz Jonatan R
Vicente-Rodríguez German
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. ortegaf@ugr.es
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2008;3(4):212-6
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adiposity - physiology
Adolescent
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The aim of this study was to provide percentile values for several indices of central adiposity in 9- and 15-year-old Swedish children from the European Youth Heart Study (N=1,075). Age- and sex-specific percentiles for waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-to-height ratio and waist-to-hip ratio were provided. No significant differences were found in the proportion of individuals with a high waist-to-height ratio (using the 0.500 cut-off) between age or sex groups. The percentile values for waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio provided in this paper, together with data from other cohorts, could help to establish international criteria for defining central obesity. For comparative purposes, future studies reporting reference data for waist circumference and/or waist-to-height ratio, should also report age- and sex-specific height values. More studies involving children of different ages and from different regions in Scandinavia are needed.
PubMed ID
18608639 View in PubMed
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Cultural participation and health: a randomized controlled trial among medical care staff.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89534
Source
Psychosom Med. 2009 May;71(4):469-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Bygren Lars Olov
Weissglas Gösta
Wikström Britt-Maj
Konlaan Boinkum Benson
Grjibovski Andrej
Karlsson Ann-Brith
Andersson Sven-Olof
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience and Nutrition, the Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, S-14157 Stockholm, Sweden. lars-olov.bygren@prevnut.ki.se
Source
Psychosom Med. 2009 May;71(4):469-73
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Art
Culture
Drama
Female
Health Facility Administrators - psychology
Health Personnel - psychology
Health status
Humans
Hydrocortisone - analysis
Immunoglobulin A - analysis
Leisure Activities
Male
Memory
Middle Aged
Motion Pictures as Topic
Music
Quality of Life
Saliva - chemistry
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Social Behavior
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Population studies demonstrate that attending cultural events is conducive to improved health when baseline health, income, education, and health habits are taken into account. Animal experiments suggest possible mechanisms. We studied the link in humans between attending cultural events and health in a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Members of the local government officers' union in the health services in Umeå, Sweden, were invited to the experiment and 101 people registered for fine arts visits once a week for 8 weeks. They chose films, concerts, or art exhibitions visits, or singing in a choir and were then randomized into 51 cases, starting at once, and 50 controls starting after the trial. Health was assessed before randomization and after the experimental period using the instrument for perceived health, short form (SF)-36, and tests of episodic memory, saliva-cortisol and immunoglobulin. The results were analyzed using a mixed design analysis of variance. RESULTS: The SF-36 Composite Score called physical health improved in the intervention group and decreased among controls during the experiment (F(1,87) = 7.06, p = .009). The individual factor of the SF-36 called social functioning, improved more in the intervention group than among controls (F(1,98) = 8.11, p = .005) as well as the factor vitality (F(1,98) = 5.26, p = .024). The six other factors and the Mental Health Composite Score, episodic memory, cortisol and immunoglobulin levels did not change otherwise than among controls. Mechanisms are left to be identified. CONCLUSION: Fine arts stimulations improved perceived physical health, social functioning, and vitality.
PubMed ID
19321851 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake among under-, normal- and overweight 9- and 15-year-old Estonian and Swedish schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78859
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Mar;10(3):311-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Villa Inga
Yngve Agneta
Poortvliet Eric
Grjibovski Andrej
Liiv Krystiine
Sjöström Michael
Harro Maarike
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Tartu, Ravila 19, Tartu, Estonia. Inga.Villa@ut.ee
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Mar;10(3):311-22
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Overweight
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thinness - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine the differences in macronutrient and food group contribution to total food and energy intakes between Estonian and Swedish under-, normal- and overweight schoolchildren, and to estimate the association between diet and body mass index (BMI). DESIGN: Cross-sectional comparison between Estonian and Swedish children and adolescents of different BMI groups. SETTING: Twenty-five schools from one region in Estonia and 42 in two regions of central Sweden. SUBJECTS: In total 2308 participants (1176 from Estonia and 1132 from Sweden), including 1141 children with a mean age of 9.6 +/- 0.5 years and 1167 adolescents with a mean age of 15.5 +/- 0.6 years. RESULTS: Overweight was more prevalent among younger girls in Sweden (17.0 vs. 8.9%) and underweight among girls of both age groups in Estonia (7.9 vs. 3.5% in younger and 10.5 vs. 5.1% in older age group of girls). Compared with that of normal- and underweight peers, the diet of overweight Estonian children contained more energy as fat (36.8 vs. 31.7%) but less as carbohydrates, and they consumed more milk and meat products. Absolute BMI of Estonian participants was associated positively with energy consumption from eggs and negatively with energy consumption from sweets and sugar. Swedish overweight adolescents tended to consume more energy from protein and milk products. Risk of being overweight was positively associated with total energy intake and energy from fish or meat products. In both countries the association of overweight and biological factors (pubertal maturation, parental BMI) was stronger than with diet. CONCLUSION: The finding that differences in dietary intake between under-, normal- and overweight schoolchildren are country-specific suggests that local dietary habits should be considered in intervention projects addressing overweight.
PubMed ID
17288630 View in PubMed
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High cardiovascular fitness is associated with low metabolic risk score in children: the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78700
Source
Pediatr Res. 2007 Mar;61(3):350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Ruiz Jonatan R
Ortega Francisco B
Rizzo Nico S
Villa Inga
Hurtig-Wennlöf Anita
Oja Leila
Sjöström Michael
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, 14157, Sweden. ruizj@ugr.es
Source
Pediatr Res. 2007 Mar;61(3):350-5
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Cardiovascular physiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - etiology - physiopathology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine the associations of cardiovascular fitness (CVF) with a clustering of metabolic risk factors in children, and to examine whether there is a CVF level associated with a low metabolic risk. CVF was estimated by a maximal ergometer bike test on 873 randomly selected children from Sweden and Estonia. Additional measured outcomes included fasting insulin, glucose, triglycerides, HDLC, blood pressure, and the sum of five skinfolds. A metabolic risk score was computed as the mean of the standardized outcomes scores. A risk score
PubMed ID
17314696 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.