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Ants and their nests as indicators for industrial heavy metal contamination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295137
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Sep; 240:574-581
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2018
Author
Oksana Skaldina
Sirpa Peräniemi
Jouni Sorvari
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Sep; 240:574-581
Date
Sep-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Ants - chemistry - physiology
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Industrial Waste - analysis
Industry
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
Ants accumulate heavy metals and respond to pollution with modification in species composition, community structure, altered behaviour and immunity. However, the levels of heavy metals in ants' nests and explicit individual-level responses towards heavy metals have not been revealed. We found that red wood ants Formica lugubris accumulate high and correlated values of such heavy metals as Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn both in ants and nest material near cobalt smelter in Finland. Relative differences in metal concentrations were higher in nests than in ants. The highest values were obtained for elements such as Co (36.6), Zn (14.9), Cd (9.7), Pb (8.5), Cu (7.4), Ni (6.4), As (4.7), Cr (2.9) and Fe (2.4) in nest material, and Co (32.7), Cd (6.3), Pb (6), Fe (2.8), Ni (2.9) and Zn (2.1) in ants. In industrial and reference areas, ants have no differences in size, but differed in dry and residual body mass. In polluted areas, F. lugubris had less melanised heads, but not thoraxes. The sensitivity of cuticular colouration in red wood ants subjected to heavy metal pollution might be related to metal-binding properties of melanins. The overall results are useful for the improvement of biomonitoring techniques using ants as indicators of industrial contamination and for further discovery of novel ecotoxicological biomarkers.
PubMed ID
29763860 View in PubMed
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Facing the threat: common yellowjacket wasps as indicators of heavy metal pollution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305869
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2020 Aug; 27(23):29031-29042
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2020
Author
Oksana Skaldina
Robert Ciszek
Sirpa Peräniemi
Mikko Kolehmainen
Jouni Sorvari
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, FI-70211, Kuopio, Finland. oksana.skaldina@uef.fi.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2020 Aug; 27(23):29031-29042
Date
Aug-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Environmental Biomarkers
Environmental monitoring
Finland
Mercury
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Wasps
Abstract
We investigated the common wasp, Vespula vulgaris as a bioindicator and biomonitor of metals in the industrial area. Using traps, we collected 257 yellowjackets along a pollution gradient in the Harjavalta Cu-Ni smelter in Southwest Finland. Our method detected metal elements such as arsenic (As), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and mercury (Hg) in wasps. The data analyses revealed V. vulgaris can be a proper indicator for As, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, and Pb, rather than for Fe and Zn contamination. Body burdens of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, and Pb decreased with an increase in distance from smelter. Enrichment factor (EF) followed the pattern Pb ? Cd ? As ? Co ? Cu ? Ni. The highest bioaccumulation (BAF) values were revealed for Cd (5.9) and the lowest for Pb (0.1). Specially designed software (WaspFacer) allowed revealing body burdens of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, and Pb to be associated with rather smaller than more asymmetric facial colour markings in yellowjackets. These results add to the body of literature on how heavy metal contaminants can have tangible phenotypic effects on insects and open future opportunities for using wasps as indicators of metal pollution.
PubMed ID
32424749 View in PubMed
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