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Common variants in human CRC genes as low-risk alleles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98081
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Apr;46(6):1041-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Simone Picelli
Pawel Zajac
Xiao-Lei Zhou
David Edler
Claes Lenander
Johan Dalén
Fredrik Hjern
Nils Lundqvist
Ulrik Lindforss
Lars Påhlman
Kennet Smedh
Anders Törnqvist
Jörn Holm
Martin Janson
Magnus Andersson
Susanne Ekelund
Louise Olsson
Joakim Lundeberg
Annika Lindblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Apr;46(6):1041-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Germ-Line Mutation - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Penetrance
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC) has been estimated to be around 35% and yet high-penetrance germline mutations found so far explain less than 5% of all cases. Much of the remaining variations could be due to the co-inheritance of multiple low penetrant variants. The identification of all the susceptibility alleles could have public health relevance in the near future. To test the hypothesis that what are considered polymorphisms in human CRC genes could constitute low-risk alleles, we selected eight common SNPs for a pilot association study in 1785 cases and 1722 controls. One SNP, rs3219489:G>C (MUTYH Q324H) seemed to confer an increased risk of rectal cancer in homozygous status (OR=1.52; CI=1.06-2.17). When the analysis was restricted to our 'super-controls', healthy individuals with no family history for cancer, also rs1799977:A>G (MLH1 I219V) was associated with an increased risk in both colon and rectum patients with an odds ratio of 1.28 (CI=1.02-1.60) and 1.34 (CI=1.05-1.72), respectively (under the dominant model); while 2 SNPs, rs1800932:A>G (MSH6 P92P) and rs459552:T>A (APC D1822V) seemed to confer a protective effect. The latter, in particular showed an odds ratio of 0.76 (CI=0.60-0.97) among colon patients and 0.73 (CI=0.56-0.95) among rectal patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that common variants in human CRC genes could constitute low-risk alleles.
PubMed ID
20149637 View in PubMed
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Defining New Colorectal Cancer Syndromes in a Population-based Cohort of the Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281663
Source
Anticancer Res. 2017 04;37(4):1831-1835
Publication Type
Article
Date
04-2017
Author
Anna Forsberg
Anne Keränen
Susanna VON Holst
Simone Picelli
Nikos Papadogiannakis
Sam Ghazi
Annika Lindblom
Source
Anticancer Res. 2017 04;37(4):1831-1835
Date
04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Syndrome
Abstract
Most known cancer syndromes confer an increased risk of more than one tumour types, and families with more than one colorectal cancer often segregate other cancers as well. The aim of this study was to examine if there is a general increased risk of other cancers in colorectal cancer families, which are defined as having two or more cases of colorectal cancer in close relatives.
The study used a detailed family history of cancer diagnoses in a cohort of more than 3,000 consecutive colorectal cancer cases. A comparison was made between families with sporadic and those with familial colorectal cancer cases. Detailed morphology data were used to find further support for putative syndromes.
There were significantly more non-colorectal cancers in the family history of the familial CRC cases (p
PubMed ID
28373448 View in PubMed
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