Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

17 records – page 1 of 2.

Association Between Objectively Measured Sleep Duration and Symptoms of Psychiatric Disorders in Middle Childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307511
Source
JAMA Netw Open. 2019 12 02; 2(12):e1918281
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-02-2019
Author
Bror M Ranum
Lars Wichstrøm
Ståle Pallesen
Jonas Falch-Madsen
Marte Halse
Silje Steinsbekk
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
Source
JAMA Netw Open. 2019 12 02; 2(12):e1918281
Date
12-02-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Child Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Somnambulism - epidemiology
Abstract
The long-term association between sleep duration and mental health in children is currently unknown.
To investigate the prospective associations between sleep duration and symptoms of emotional and behavioral disorders at ages 6, 8, 10, and 12 years.
This population-based cohort study obtained data from the Trondheim Early Secure Study in Trondheim, Norway. A representative, stratified random sample of children born between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2004, were invited to participate. Participants were followed up biennially from age 4 years (2007-2008) to 12 years (2013-2014). Data analysis was conducted from January 2, 2019, to May 28, 2019.
Sleep duration was assessed with 1 week of continuous use of a triaxial accelerometer. Symptoms of emotional (anxiety and depression) and behavioral (oppositional defiant, conduct, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity) disorders were measured by semistructured clinical interviews (using the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment and the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment) with parents (at all ages) and children (from age 8 years).
The analytical sample comprised 799 children (mean [SD] age at time point 2, 6.0 [0.2] years; 405 [50.7%] boys; and 771 [96.5%] Norwegian). Shorter sleep duration at age 6 years (ß [unstandardized regression coefficient]?=?-0.44; 95% CI, -0.80 to -0.08; P?=?.02) and 8 years (ß?=?-0.47; 95% CI, -0.83 to -0.11; P?=?.01) forecasted symptoms of emotional disorders 2 years later. Comparatively short sleep duration at age 8 years (ß?=?-0.65; 95% CI,?-1.22 to -0.08; P?=?.03) and 10 years (ß?=?-0.58; 95% CI,?-1.07 to -0.08; P?=?.02) was associated with symptoms of behavioral disorders 2 years later among boys but not among girls at age 8 years (ß =?-0.14; 95% CI,-?0.52 to 0.24; P?=?.48) or 10 years (ß?=?-0.05; 95% CI,?=?-0.49 to 0.40; P?=?.84). These associations were statistically significant among boys compared with girls at age 8 years (??21?=?13.26; P?
PubMed ID
31880797 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body composition impacts appetite regulation in middle childhood. A prospective study of Norwegian community children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287229
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 05 30;14(1):70
Publication Type
Article
Date
05-30-2017
Author
Silje Steinsbekk
Clare H Llewellyn
Alison Fildes
Lars Wichstrøm
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 05 30;14(1):70
Date
05-30-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appetite - physiology
Appetite Regulation - physiology
Body Composition - physiology
Child
Eating
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Food
Humans
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Satiation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Research suggests a role for both fat mass and muscle mass in appetite regulation, but the longitudinal relationships between them have not yet been examined in children. The present study therefore aimed to explore the prospective relationships between fat mass, muscle mass and the appetitive traits food responsiveness and satiety responsiveness in middle childhood.
Food responsiveness and satiety responsiveness were measured using the parent-reported Children's Eating Behavior Questionnaire in a representative sample of Norwegian 6?year olds, followed up at 8 and 10?years of age (n?=?807). Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance.
Applying a structural equation modeling framework we found that higher fat mass predicted greater increases in food responsiveness over time, whereas greater muscle mass predicted decreases in satiety responsiveness. This pattern was consistent both from ages 6 to 8 and from ages 8 to 10?years.
Our study is the first to reveal that fat mass and muscle mass predict distinct changes in different appetitive traits over time. Replication of findings in non-European populations are needed, as are studies of children in other age groups. Future studies should also aim to reveal the underlying mechanisms.
Notes
Cites: Appetite. 2007 Jan;48(1):104-1316962207
Cites: BMC Pediatr. 2015 Oct 12;15:15326459321
Cites: Dis Model Mech. 2012 Sep;5(5):608-1322915022
Cites: Neuroimage. 2013 Jan 1;64:712-2122974975
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2012 Feb;107(3):445-921733267
Cites: Child Obes. 2015 Oct;11(5):650-526332367
Cites: Science. 2005 Mar 25;307(5717):1909-1415790843
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012 Oct 30;9:13023110748
Cites: Hum Hered. 2013;75(2-4):80-924081223
Cites: Ann Hum Biol. 2013 May;40(3):220-723414181
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2001 Oct;42(7):963-7011693591
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2006 Dec;116(12):3229-3917060947
Cites: Appetite. 2014 Mar;74:79-8524316574
Cites: Nat Neurosci. 2015 Jun;18(6):863-7125915476
Cites: JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Apr;168(4):345-5024535222
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1989 Feb;49(2):320-52916451
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jul;98(1):49-5623697708
Cites: Appetite. 2011 Oct;57(2):525-921658420
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Apr;30(4):598-60216570089
Cites: Physiology (Bethesda). 2008 Apr;23:75-8318400690
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Jan;33(1):21-819002146
Cites: J Mol Endocrinol. 2016 May;56(4):T157-7426939593
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008 Aug;62(8):985-9017684526
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2016 Jun;41(6):611-727111402
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Dec;69(12):1356-926264350
Cites: Appetite. 2015 Sep;92:233-926049019
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2008 Apr 04;8:10618394152
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 Oct;32(10):1499-50518645573
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2003 Apr;284(4):R882-9212626355
Cites: Appetite. 2012 Oct;59(2):541-922796186
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jul;88(1):22-918614720
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jun;83(6):1276-8216762937
Cites: Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2005 Aug;97(2):61-7315998351
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2013 Apr;8(2):e29-3223239610
Cites: Ann Nutr Metab. 2014;64(2):113-2124992892
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;97(1):7-1423193010
Cites: Physiol Behav. 2015 Dec 1;152(Pt B):473-826037633
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2008 Nov;67(4):343-5518715519
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Sep;19(3):405-1916150383
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2016 Oct;116(8):1425-143627725008
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2000 May;904:359-6510865771
Cites: J Pediatr Psychol. 2015 Nov-Dec;40(10):1056-6426050242
PubMed ID
28558723 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cohort Profile: The Trondheim Early Secure Study (TESS)-a study of mental health, psychosocial development and health behaviour from preschool to adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294862
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 Oct 01; 47(5):1401-1401i
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2018
Author
Silje Steinsbekk
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 Oct 01; 47(5):1401-1401i
Date
Oct-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
PubMed ID
30215720 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cohort Profile: The Trondheim Early Secure Study (TESS)-a study of mental health, psychosocial development and health behaviour from preschool to adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300334
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 10 01; 47(5):1401-1401i
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Silje Steinsbekk
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 10 01; 47(5):1401-1401i
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Development
Child health
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Norway - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Personality
PubMed ID
30215720 View in PubMed
Less detail

Emotional Over- and Undereating in Children: A Longitudinal Analysis of Child and Contextual Predictors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310737
Source
Child Dev. 2019 11; 90(6):e803-e818
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2019
Author
Oda Bjørklund
Lars Wichstrøm
Clare H Llewellyn
Silje Steinsbekk
Author Affiliation
Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
Source
Child Dev. 2019 11; 90(6):e803-e818
Date
11-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adverse Childhood Experiences - statistics & numerical data
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Feeding and Eating Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Parenting
Temperament
Abstract
Eating more or eating less in response to negative emotions, called emotional over- and undereating, is common in children, but research on the etiology of these behaviors is in its infancy. Drawing on a large, representative community sample of Norwegian children followed up on a biennial basis from 6 to 10 years of age (analysis sample: n = 802), child and contextual predictors (i.e., child temperament, depression symptoms, serious life events, family functioning, parental sensitivity and structuring) of change in emotional over- and undereating were examined. Results revealed that low (temperamental) soothability and less parental structuring at age 6 predicted increased emotional overeating at age 10 and that lower family functioning at age 6 predicted more emotional undereating during the same period.
PubMed ID
29959767 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health in overweight children: 2-year follow-up of Finnmark Activity School-a randomised trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258415
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2014 Nov 20;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-2014
Author
Ane Kokkvoll
Sameline Grimsgaard
Silje Steinsbekk
Trond Flægstad
Inger Njølstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Finnmark Hospital Trust, Hammerfest, Norway.
Source
Arch Dis Child. 2014 Nov 20;
Date
Nov-20-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To compare a comprehensive lifestyle intervention for overweight children performed in groups of families with a conventional single-family treatment. Two-year follow-up data on anthropometric and psychological outcome are presented.
Overweight and obese children aged 6-12 years with body mass index (BMI) corresponding to =27.5 kg/m(2) in adults were randomised to multiple-family (n=48) or single-family intervention (n=49) in a parallel design. Multiple-family intervention comprised an inpatient programme with other families and a multidisciplinary team, follow-up visits in their hometown, weekly physical activity and a family camp. Single-family intervention included counselling by paediatric nurse, paediatric consultant and nutritionist at the hospital and follow-up by a community public health nurse. Primary outcome measures were change in BMI kg/m(2) and BMI SD score after 2 years.
BMI increased by 1.29 kg/m(2) in the multiple-family intervention compared with 2.02 kg/m(2) in the single-family intervention (p=0.075). BMI SD score decreased by 0.20 units in the multiple-family group and 0.08 units in the single-family intervention group (p=0.046). A between-group difference of 2.4 cm in waist circumference (p=0.038) was detected. Pooled data from both treatment groups showed a significant decrease in BMI SD score of 0.14 units and a significant decrease in parent-reported and self-reported Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire total score of 1.9 units.
Two-year outcome showed no between-group difference in BMI. A small between-group effect in BMI SD score and waist circumference favouring multiple-family intervention was detected. Pooled data showed an overall improvement in psychological outcome measures and BMI SD score.
NCT00872807, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.
PubMed ID
25414250 View in PubMed
Less detail

Homotypic and heterotypic continuity of symptoms of psychiatric disorders from age 4 to 10 years: a dynamic panel model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292262
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017 Nov; 58(11):1239-1247
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Lars Wichstrøm
Jay Belsky
Silje Steinsbekk
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017 Nov; 58(11):1239-1247
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child, Preschool
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Statistical
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Childhood psychiatric disorders and their symptoms evince both within-disorder (homotypic) and between-disorder (heterotypic) continuities. These continuities may be due to earlier symptoms causing later symptoms or, alternatively, that the same (unknown) causes (e.g., genetics) are operating across time. Applying a novel data analytic approach, we disentangle these two explanations.
Participants in a Norwegian community study were assessed biennially from 4 to 10 years of age with clinical interviews (n = 1,042). Prospective reciprocal relations between symptoms of disorders were analyzed with a dynamic panel model within a structural equation framework, adjusting for all unmeasured time-invariant confounders and time-varying negative life-events.
Homotypic continuities in symptoms characterized all disorders; strongest for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (r = .32-.62), moderate for behavioral disorders (r = .31-.48) and for anxiety and depression (r = .15-.40), and stronger between 8 and 10 than between 4 and 6 years. Heterotypic continuity also characterized all disorders. A dynamic panel model showed that most continuities were due to unmeasured time-invariant factors rather than effects of earlier symptoms on later symptoms, although symptoms of behavioral disorders, which evinced two-year homotypic continuity (B = .14, 95% CI: .04, .25), did influence later symptoms of ADHD (B = .13, CI: .03, .23), and earlier ADHD symptoms influenced later anxiety disorder symptoms (B = .07, CI: .01, .12).
Homotypic and heterotypic continuities of symptoms of childhood psychiatric disorders are mostly due to unobserved time-invariant factors. Nonetheless, symptoms of earlier behavioral disorders may affect later symptoms of such disorders and of ADHD, and ADHD may increase the risk of later anxiety. Thus, even if interventions do not alter basic etiological factors, symptom reduction may itself cause later symptom reduction.
PubMed ID
28543077 View in PubMed
Less detail

Parental Feeding and Child Eating: An Investigation of Reciprocal Effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286195
Source
Child Dev. 2016 Sep;87(5):1538-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Silje Steinsbekk
Jay Belsky
Lars Wichstrøm
Source
Child Dev. 2016 Sep;87(5):1538-49
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child, Preschool
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Parenting - psychology
Abstract
Parental feeding practices and children's eating behavior are consistently related to childhood obesity. However, it is not known whether parents' feeding practices predict obesogenic eating behavior or vice versa. In a Norwegian cohort (n = 797), it was found that greater parental use of food as a reward (instrumental feeding) when children were 6 predicted increased emotional overeating and food responsiveness, whereas greater parental encouragement to eat forecasted increased enjoyment of food 2 years later. No evidence of child effects emerged. Although children's eating behavior is relatively stable and established at an early age, findings suggest that parental feeding practices can serve as targets of intervention to prevent the development of obesogenic eating behavior.
PubMed ID
27154834 View in PubMed
Less detail

Parental predictors of children's executive functioning from ages 6 to 10.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310675
Source
Br J Dev Psychol. 2019 09; 37(3):410-426
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2019
Author
Marte Halse
Silje Steinsbekk
Åsa Hammar
Jay Belsky
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Br J Dev Psychol. 2019 09; 37(3):410-426
Date
09-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavioral Symptoms - physiopathology
Child
Child Development - physiology
Child of Impaired Parents
Child, Preschool
Educational Status
Executive Function - physiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Parenting
Parents
Self-Control
Social Class
Abstract
According to prominent models of child development, parental factors may contribute to individual differences in children's executive functioning (EF). Here, we examine the relative importance of parents' socio-economic status, mental health, and parenting as predictors of EF development, drawing on a large (n = 1,070) community sample of Norwegian children who received biennial EF assessments from 6 to 10 years of age. We measure EF by means of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function. We assess parenting through observer ratings of parent-child interactions and parental mental health via the Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, and Hopkins Symptom Checklist. When we adjust for all time-invariant unmeasured confounders, higher parental education predicts superior EF development, whereas harsh parenting forecasts poorer EF development. However, parenting does not mediate the effect of parental education. These results indicate that harsh parenting should be targeted in interventions aimed at improving EF. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Parental factors seem to affect child development of executive functions (EF). Specifically, parental socio-economic status, mental health, and their parenting seem to influence the developmental course of child EF. What does this study add? To what degree the parental influence on EF development is likely to be driven by time-invariant factors, for example, genetics. The relative influence of positive and negative parenting on EF development.
PubMed ID
30816580 View in PubMed
Less detail

Parents' Personality-Disorder Symptoms Predict Children's Symptoms of Anxiety and Depressive Disorders - a Prospective Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309445
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2019 12; 47(12):1931-1943
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2019
Author
Silje Steinsbekk
Turid Suzanne Berg-Nielsen
Jay Belsky
Elisabeth Berg Helland
Marte Hågenrud
Andrea Raballo
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491, Dragvoll, Trondheim, Norway. Silje.Steinsbekk@ntnu.no.
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2019 12; 47(12):1931-1943
Date
12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Parents
Personality Disorders - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Personality disorder (PD) symptomatology is characterized by interpersonal problems and emotional dysregulation, which may affect offspring of parents with PD symptoms. Notably though, studies are needed to discern (i) whether parental PDs forecast symptoms of psychiatric disorders in offspring during their childhood years and (ii) whether such prospective relations obtain after accounting for common causes (e.g., genetics, common methods). To address these issues, we followed up a community sample of Norwegian children biennially from ages 4 to 8 (n?=?594), using a semi-structured psychiatric interview (PAPA/CAPA) to capture DSM-IV defined symptoms of emotional disorders. Parental symptoms of personality disorders were captured by the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Questionnaire (DIP-Q), whereas depression and anxiety in caregivers were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory -II and Beck Anxiety Inventory, respectively. Upon applying a hybrid fixed and random effects method that takes into account all unmeasured time-invariant confounders, we found that: (i) Parental symptoms of DSM-IV defined Cluster A and C were related to symptoms of anxiety disorders in offspring two years later, even after accounting for children's initial levels of anxiety and parental anxiety, whereas (ii) Parental DSM-IV Cluster B predicted symptoms of depressive disorders in children, adjusted for children's initial levels of depression and parental depression. Clinical implications of the results are discussed.
PubMed ID
31197502 View in PubMed
Less detail

17 records – page 1 of 2.