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Cardiovascular risk factor patterns and their association with diet in Saami and Finnish reindeer herders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102174
Source
Pages 301-304 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
  1 document  
Author
Näyhä, S
Sikkilä, K
Hassi, J
Nayha, S
Sikkila, K
Author Affiliation
Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu Finland
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland
Source
Pages 301-304 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Antioxidants
Cardiovascular disease
Diet
Finland
Health
Reindeer herders
Reindeer meat
Risk factors
Saami
Serum cholesterol
Abstract
Cardiovascular risk factors and their association with diet were examined in Saami (Lapp) and Finnish reindeer herders (total sample size 2705). The Saami men showed lower systolic blood pressure (130 mmHg) than the Finns (137 mmHg), higher serum total cholesterol (6.92 vs. 6.51 mmol/l) and triglycerides (1.32 vs. 1.11 mmol/l), and more Saami than Finnish men were smokers (34% vs. 27%). Subjects eating reindeer meat daily showed serum cholesterol 0.6 mmol/l higher than those who did so once a month or more rarely, the association being independent of age, season, body mass index, or consumption of coffee, milk, bread, fish, or alcohol. The high content of antioxidants of the Saami diet might explain why cardiovascular diseases are relatively uncommon in the Saami area despite the adverse risk factor pattern.
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Seasonal variation of serum TSH and thyroid hormones in males living in subarctic environmental conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5304
Source
Pages 383-385 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
  1 document  
Author
Leppäluoto, J.
Sikkilä, K.
Hassi, J.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Pages 383-385 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Finland
Humans
Male
Radioimmunoassay
Reference Values
Seasons
Sex Factors
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Thyrotropin - blood
Abstract
To evaluate the seasonal influence upon thyroid hormone dynamics, we took blood samples every two months during a period of 14 months from 20 healthy males living in Northern Finland (69-70 degrees N), where the mean daily temperature ranges from a winter minimum of -40 degrees C to a summer maximum of 2 degrees C, while the photoperiod changes from a polar night of 6 days in winter to a polar day of 45 days in summer. The subjects were allowed free choice of diet, exercise, and outdoor exposure. Serum free T3 levels were lower in February than in August (3.9 vs. 4.4 pmol/l, p
PubMed ID
10093311 View in PubMed
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