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Adolescent antisocial behavior and substance use: longitudinal analyses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10058
Source
Addict Behav. 2002 Mar-Apr;27(2):227-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sigrun Adalbjarnardottir
Fjolvar Darri Rafnsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, Oddi, University of Iceland, Reykjavik. sa@hi.is
Source
Addict Behav. 2002 Mar-Apr;27(2):227-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - psychology
Family Health
Female
Humans
Iceland
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
This study explores how antisocial behavior among adolescents at age 14 is related longitudinally to their daily smoking, heavy alcohol use, and illicit drug use (hashish and amphetamines) at age 17. The sample of 9th graders (n = 1293) attending compulsory schools in Reykjavik, Iceland participated in the study and in the follow-up 3 years later. The focus is on a subgroup of 17-year-old adolescents who had not experimented with cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, or illicit drug use at age 14. Even after eliminating from the study those who had experimented with smoking at age 14 and those whose peers smoked, the adolescents who showed more signs of antisocial behavior at age 14 were more likely to smoke daily at age 17. Similar findings were revealed for illicit drug use at age 17. Further, with regard to alcohol use, adolescents who had not experimented with alcohol but showed indications of antisocial behavior at age 14 were more likely to drink heavily at each episode at age 17 if their parents drank.
PubMed ID
11817764 View in PubMed
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Adolescent psychosocial maturity and alcohol use: quantitative and qualitative analysis of longitudinal data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9984
Source
Adolescence. 2002;37(145):19-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Sigrun Adalbjarnardottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik. sa@hi.is
Source
Adolescence. 2002;37(145):19-53
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aging - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Parents - psychology
Peer Group
Predictive value of tests
Psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Social Class
Time Factors
Abstract
Based on a psyschosocial developmental framework, this study used a mixed model design, including both quantitative and qualitative methods, to examine the relationship between adolescents' psychosocial maturity and their alcohol use. A sample of 1,198 10th-grade students (51% female) was surveyed and followed up two years later. Both concurrent and longitudinal findings indicated that the more psychosocially mature adolescents were less likely to drink heavily than those who showed less maturity. At age 15 this relationship was even stronger for those whose peers also drank. Further, at age 17, this linear relationship was more pronounced for those who drank less heavily at age 15. Of the three psychosocial competencies examined, the construct of personal meaning was more strongly related to adolescent alcohol use than were the constructs of interpersonal understanding and interpersonal skills. To illustrate this construct, two of the adolescents were interviewed, a girl and a boy, individually at the end of both school years. Thematic and developmental analyses of the interviews revealed individual variations in how the adolescents made meaning of their drinking; these encourage speculations that go beyond the general pattern found in the study.
PubMed ID
12003290 View in PubMed
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Parenting practices and school dropout: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99062
Source
Adolescence. 2009;44(176):729-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Kristjana S Blondal
Sigrun Adalbjarnardottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Adolescence. 2009;44(176):729-49
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Humans
Iceland
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Parenting
Risk factors
Student Dropouts - psychology
Abstract
Adolescents' perceptions of parenting style and parental involvement in their education were examined longitudinally and related to school dropout among Icelandic youth (N = 427). Results indicated that adolescents who, at age 14, characterized their parents as authoritative (showing acceptance and supervision) were more likely to have completed upper secondary school by age 22 than adolescents from non-authoritative families, controlling for adolescents' gender, socioeconomic status (SES), temperament, and parental involvement. Parenting style seems to more strongly predict school dropout than parental involvement. Further, parenting style may moderate the relationship between parental involvement and dropout, but not in all groups; only in authoritative families does parental involvement decrease the likelihood of school dropout. Furthermore, even after controlling for previous academic achievement, adolescents from authoritative families were less likely to drop out than adolescents from authoritarian and neglectful families. These findings emphasize the importance of encouraging quality parent-child relationships in order to reduce the likelihood of school dropout.
PubMed ID
20432598 View in PubMed
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