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Climate change. Whither Arctic climate?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95914
Source
Science. 2003 Jan 10;299(5604):215-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2003
Author
Shindell Drew
Author Affiliation
NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY 10025, USA. dshindell@giss.nasa.gov
Source
Science. 2003 Jan 10;299(5604):215-6
Date
Jan-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
PubMed ID
12522240 View in PubMed
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Global signatures and dynamical origins of the Little Ice Age and Medieval Climate Anomaly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94601
Source
Science. 2009 Nov 27;326(5957):1256-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-2009
Author
Mann Michael E
Zhang Zhihua
Rutherford Scott
Bradley Raymond S
Hughes Malcolm K
Shindell Drew
Ammann Caspar
Faluvegi Greg
Ni Fenbiao
Author Affiliation
Department of Meteorology and Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. mann@meteo.psu.edu
Source
Science. 2009 Nov 27;326(5957):1256-60
Date
Nov-27-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Global temperatures are known to have varied over the past 1500 years, but the spatial patterns have remained poorly defined. We used a global climate proxy network to reconstruct surface temperature patterns over this interval. The Medieval period is found to display warmth that matches or exceeds that of the past decade in some regions, but which falls well below recent levels globally. This period is marked by a tendency for La Niña-like conditions in the tropical Pacific. The coldest temperatures of the Little Ice Age are observed over the interval 1400 to 1700 C.E., with greatest cooling over the extratropical Northern Hemisphere continents. The patterns of temperature change imply dynamical responses of climate to natural radiative forcing changes involving El Niño and the North Atlantic Oscillation-Arctic Oscillation.
PubMed ID
19965474 View in PubMed
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Warming of the Antarctic ice-sheet surface since the 1957 International Geophysical Year.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95451
Source
Nature. 2009 Jan 22;457(7228):459-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2009
Author
Steig Eric J
Schneider David P
Rutherford Scott D
Mann Michael E
Comiso Josefino C
Shindell Drew T
Author Affiliation
Department of Earth and Space Sciences and Quaternary Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. steig@ess.washington.edu
Source
Nature. 2009 Jan 22;457(7228):459-62
Date
Jan-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Antarctic Regions
Calibration
Greenhouse Effect
Ice Cover - chemistry
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
Assessments of Antarctic temperature change have emphasized the contrast between strong warming of the Antarctic Peninsula and slight cooling of the Antarctic continental interior in recent decades. This pattern of temperature change has been attributed to the increased strength of the circumpolar westerlies, largely in response to changes in stratospheric ozone. This picture, however, is substantially incomplete owing to the sparseness and short duration of the observations. Here we show that significant warming extends well beyond the Antarctic Peninsula to cover most of West Antarctica, an area of warming much larger than previously reported. West Antarctic warming exceeds 0.1 degrees C per decade over the past 50 years, and is strongest in winter and spring. Although this is partly offset by autumn cooling in East Antarctica, the continent-wide average near-surface temperature trend is positive. Simulations using a general circulation model reproduce the essential features of the spatial pattern and the long-term trend, and we suggest that neither can be attributed directly to increases in the strength of the westerlies. Instead, regional changes in atmospheric circulation and associated changes in sea surface temperature and sea ice are required to explain the enhanced warming in West Antarctica.
Notes
Erratum In: Nature. 2009 Aug 6;460(7256):766
PubMed ID
19158794 View in PubMed
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