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Functional ability at age 75: is there an impact of physical inactivity from middle age to early old age?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81168
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2006 Aug;16(4):245-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Christensen U.
Støvring N.
Schultz-Larsen K.
Schroll M.
Avlund K.
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. U.Christensen@socmed.ku.dk
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2006 Aug;16(4):245-51
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Denmark
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Activity
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of physical inactivity from middle age to early old age on functional ability at age 75. Physical activity is measured both as cumulated activity from age 50 to 60 to 70 and at three separate points in time. Three hundred eighty-seven men and women born in 1914 and living in seven municipalities in the western part of the County of Copenhagen were followed for 25 years with examinations in 1964, 1974, 1984 and 1989. Analyses were conducted with physical inactivity as an independent variable (accumulated and separately for each point in time) and smoking, sex, school education, household composition, chronic disease at baseline and functional ability at age 70 as possible confounders. There was a strong association between physical inactivity at age 70 and disability at age 75. However, the analyses showed no effect of cumulated physical inactivity from age 50 to 60 to 70 on disability at age 75 when adjusting for functional ability at age 70. Physical inactivity is a risk factor for disability among old people. Thus, old people should be encouraged to take up and maintain physical training throughout the aging process.
PubMed ID
16895529 View in PubMed
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High serum YKL-40 level in a cohort of octogenarians is associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87675
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2008 Feb;151(2):260-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Johansen J S
Pedersen A N
Schroll M.
Jørgensen T.
Pedersen B K
Bruunsgaard H.
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology and Geriatric Medicine, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. julia.johansen@post3.tele.dk
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2008 Feb;151(2):260-6
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - immunology
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glycoproteins - blood
Humans
Inflammation - immunology
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Mortality
Prognosis
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - analysis
Abstract
YKL-40 is secreted by macrophages, neutrophils, chondrocytes, endothelial-, vascular smooth muscle- and cancer cells. Interleukin (IL)-6 stimulates YKL-40 production in human in vivo studies. High serum YKL-40 is associated with poor prognosis in patients with inflammatory diseases and cancer. We studied whether serum YKL-40 was associated with systemic low-level inflammation, an immune risk phenotype, and mortality in relatively healthy 80-year old humans. Serum YKL-40, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in octogenarians (n = 151) and serum YKL-40 in 18-30-year-olds (n = 89). Fifty-one of the octogenarians died during the 6-year follow-up. Serum YKL-40 in octogenarians was higher compared to the level in young people (median 116 versus 31 microg/l, P
PubMed ID
18070151 View in PubMed
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Nutritional status and associated factors on geriatric admission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82595
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2006 Mar-Apr;10(2):84-90
Publication Type
Article
Author
Poulsen I.
Rahm Hallberg I.
Schroll M.
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen. ingrid.poulsen@omv.lu.se
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2006 Mar-Apr;10(2):84-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Appetite
Body mass index
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Male
Malnutrition - diagnosis
Mass Screening
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Oral Health
Patient Admission
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The proportion of elderly patients who are undernourished is high and undernutrition has serious health implications. No consensus exists regarding nutritional screening measurements suitable for elderly patients. There is a need to identify risk factors for undernutrition in elderly patients to enable prevention and treatment. AIM: To identify clinically identifiable risk factors for undernutrition in geriatric patients on admission. METHODS: Newly admitted patients (n=196, mean age 83.7 years) were examined for nutritional risk factors by the nursing staff. Analyses of variance and multiple regression analyses were used to identify risk factors for undernutrition. RESULTS: Undernutrition was present in 41% of the patients using a Body Mass Index cut-off
PubMed ID
16554938 View in PubMed
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