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Biochemical biomarkers in adult female perch (Perca fluviatilis) in a chronically polluted gradient in the Stockholm recipient (Sweden).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82029
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2006;53(8-9):451-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Hansson Tomas
Schiedek Doris
Lehtonen Kari K
Vuorinen Pekka J
Liewenborg Birgitta
Noaksson Erik
Tjärnlund Ulla
Hanson Marsha
Balk Lennart
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. tomas.hansson@itm.su.se
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2006;53(8-9):451-68
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylcholinesterase - analysis
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Biological Markers - analysis
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - analysis
DNA Adducts - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fresh Water - chemistry
Glutathione Transferase - analysis
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Metallothionein - analysis
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism
Perches - anatomy & histology - metabolism
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Seasons
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
A battery of biochemical biomarkers and the SigmaPCB concentration in adult female perch (Perca fluviatilis) verified an aquatic pollution gradient with the city of Stockholm (Sweden) as a point source of anthropogenic substances. The investigation included both an upstream gradient, 46 km westwards through Lake M?laren, and a downstream gradient, 84 km eastwards through the Stockholm archipelago. Besides the main gradient from Stockholm, there were strong indications of pollution coming from the Baltic Sea. The results indicated a severe pollution situation in central Stockholm, with poor health status of the perch, characterised by increased specific EROD activity in the liver, increased liver EROD somatic index, decreased AChE activity in the muscle, increased amount of DNA adducts in the liver, and a high concentration of biliary 1-pyrenol. In addition, laboratory exposure to common EROD inducers elicited an abnormal response, suggestive of chronic intoxication.
PubMed ID
16750226 View in PubMed
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Geographic and seasonal patterns and limits on the adaptive response to temperature of European Mytilus spp. and Macoma balthica populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95602
Source
Oecologia. 2007 Nov;154(1):23-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Jansen Jeroen M
Pronker Annelies E
Kube Sandra
Sokolowski Adam
Sola J Carlos
Marquiegui Mikel A
Schiedek Doris
Wendelaar Bonga Sjoerd
Wolowicz Maciej
Hummel Herman
Author Affiliation
Wageningen IMARES, Korringaweg 5, PO Box 77, 4400 AB, Yerseke, The Netherlands. jeroenm.jansen@wur.nl
Source
Oecologia. 2007 Nov;154(1):23-34
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Animals
Atlantic Ocean
Bivalvia - physiology
Demography
Ecosystem
Energy Metabolism
Europe
Oxygen consumption
Seasons
Temperature
Abstract
Seasonal variations in seawater temperature require extensive metabolic acclimatization in cold-blooded organisms inhabiting the coastal waters of Europe. Given the energetic costs of acclimatization, differences in adaptive capacity to climatic conditions are to be expected among distinct populations of species that are distributed over a wide geographic range. We studied seasonal variations in the metabolic adjustments of two very common bivalve taxa at European scale. To this end we sampled 16 populations of Mytilus spp. and 10 Macoma balthica populations distributed from 39 degrees to 69 degrees N. The results from this large-scale comprehensive comparison demonstrated seasonal cycles in metabolic rates which were maximized during winter and springtime, and often reduced in the summer and autumn. Studying the sensitivity of metabolic rates to thermal variations, we found that a broad range of Q (10) values occurred under relatively cold conditions. As habitat temperatures increased the range of Q (10) narrowed, reaching a bottleneck in southern marginal populations during summer. For Mytilus spp., genetic-group-specific clines and limits on Q (10) values were observed at temperatures corresponding to the maximum climatic conditions these geographic populations presently experience. Such specific limitations indicate differential thermal adaptation among these divergent groups. They may explain currently observed migrations in mussel distributions and invasions. Our results provide a practical framework for the thermal ecophysiology of bivalves, the assessment of environmental changes due to climate change and its impact on (and consequences for) aquaculture.
PubMed ID
17846800 View in PubMed
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Interactions between climate change and contaminants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95593
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2007 Dec;54(12):1845-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Schiedek Doris
Sundelin Brita
Readman James W
Macdonald Robie W
Author Affiliation
Baltic Sea Research Institute Warnemünde, Seestrasse 15, 18119 Rostock, Germany. doris.schiedek@io-warnemuende.de
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2007 Dec;54(12):1845-56
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - metabolism - toxicity
Animals
Arctic Regions
Climate
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Oceans and Seas
Temperature
Time Factors
Water Pollutants, Chemical - metabolism - toxicity
Abstract
There is now general consensus that climate change is a global threat and a challenge for the 21st century. More and more information is available demonstrating how increased temperature may affect aquatic ecosystems and living resources or how increased water levels may impact coastal zones and their management. Many ecosystems are also affected by human releases of contaminants, for example from land based sources or the atmosphere, which also may cause severe effects. So far these two important stresses on ecosystems have mainly been discussed independently. The present paper is intended to increase awareness among scientists, coastal zone managers and decision makers that climate change will affect contaminant exposure and toxic effects and that both forms of stress will impact aquatic ecosystems and biota. Based on examples from different ecosystems, we discuss risks anticipated from contaminants in a rapidly changing environment and the research required to understand and predict how on-going and future climate change may alter risks from chemical pollution.
PubMed ID
17963794 View in PubMed
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