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A randomized controlled trial comparing the Arctic Sun to standard cooling for induction of hypothermia after cardiac arrest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94920
Source
Resuscitation. 2009 Oct 23;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-23-2009
Author
HeardKennon J
PeberdyMary Ann
SayreMichael R
SandersArthur
GeocadinRomergryko G
DixonSimon R
LarabeeTodd M
HillerKatherine
FiorelloAlbert
ParadisNorman A
O'NeilBrian J
Author Affiliation
University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine and the Colorado Emergency Medicine Research Center, Denver, CO, United States.
Source
Resuscitation. 2009 Oct 23;
Date
Oct-23-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
CONTEXT: Hypothermia improves neurological outcome for comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Use of computer controlled high surface area devices for cooling may lead to faster cooling rates and potentially improve patient outcome. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of surface cooling with the standard blankets and ice packs to the Arctic Sun, a mechanical device used for temperature management. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: Multi-center randomized trial of hemodynamically stable comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. INTERVENTION: Standard post-resuscitative care inducing hypothermia using cooling blankets and ice (n=30) or the Arctic Sun (n=34). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary end point was the proportion of subjects who reached a target temperature within 4h of beginning cooling. The secondary end points were time interval to achieve target temperature (34 degrees C) and survival to 3 months. RESULTS: The proportion of subjects cooled below the 34 degrees C target at 4h was 71% for the Arctic Sun group and 50% for the standard cooling group (p=0.12). The median time to target was 54min faster for cooled patients in the Arctic Sun group than the standard cooling group (p
PubMed ID
19854555 View in PubMed
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