Skip header and navigation

Refine By

92 records – page 1 of 10.

Adherence to the Baltic Sea diet consumed in the Nordic countries is associated with lower abdominal obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124508
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):520-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2013
Author
Noora Kanerva
Niina E Kaartinen
Ursula Schwab
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Satu Männistö
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, FI-00270 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):520-8
Date
Feb-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Baltic States
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Quality
Food Supply
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
North Sea
Nutrition Policy
Obesity, Abdominal - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Waist Circumference - ethnology
Abstract
Due to differences in food cultures, dietary quality measures, such as the Mediterranean Diet Score, may not be easily adopted by other countries. Recently, the Baltic Sea Diet Pyramid was developed to illustrate healthy choices for the diet consumed in the Nordic countries. We assessed whether the Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) based on the Pyramid is associated with a decreased risk of obesity and abdominal obesity. The population-based cross-sectional study included 4720 Finns (25-74 years) from the National FINRISK 2007 study. Diet was assessed using a validated FFQ. The score included Nordic fruits and berries, vegetables, cereals, ratio of PUFA:SFA and trans-fatty acids, low-fat milk, fish, red and processed meat, total fat (percentage of energy), and alcohol. Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured and BMI values were calculated. In a multivariable model, men in the highest v. lowest BSDS quintile were more likely to have normal WC (OR 0·48, 95 % CI 0·29, 0·80). In women, this association was similar but not significant (OR 0·65, 95 % CI 0·39, 1·09). The association appeared to be stronger in younger age groups (men: OR 0·23, 95 % CI 0·08, 0·62; women: OR 0·17, 95 % CI 0·05, 0·58) compared with older age groups. Nordic cereals and alcohol were found to be the most important BSDS components related to WC. No association was observed between the BSDS and BMI. The present study suggests that combination of Nordic foods, especially cereals and moderate alcohol consumption, is likely to be inversely associated with abdominal obesity.
PubMed ID
22575060 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to the healthy Nordic diet is associated with weight change during 7 years of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303010
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 07; 120(1):101-110
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Noora Kanerva
Kennet Harald
Satu Männistö
Niina E Kaartinen
Mirkka Maukonen
Ari Haukkala
Pekka Jousilahti
Author Affiliation
1Department of Public Health Solutions,National Institute for Health and Welfare,PO Box 30,27100 Helsinki,Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 07; 120(1):101-110
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Body Weight
Diet
Diet, Healthy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity
Overweight - prevention & control - therapy
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Urban Population
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Studies indicate that the healthy Nordic diet may improve heart health, but its relation to weight change is less clear. We studied the association between the adherence to the healthy Nordic diet and long-term changes in weight, BMI and waist circumference. Furthermore, the agreement between self-reported and measured body anthropometrics was examined. The population-based DIetary, Lifestyle and Genetic Determinants of Obesity and Metabolic syndrome Study in 2007 included 5024 Finns aged 25-75 years. The follow-up was conducted in 2014 (n 3735). One-third of the participants were invited to a health examination. The rest were sent measuring tape and written instructions along with questionnaires. The Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) was used to measure adherence to the healthy Nordic diet. Association of the baseline BSDS and changes in BSDS during the follow-up with changes in body anthropometrics were examined using linear regression analysis. The agreement between self-reported and nurse-measured anthropometrics was determined with Bland-Altman analysis. Intra-class correlation coefficients between self-reported and nurse-measured anthropometrics exceeded 0·95. The baseline BSDS associated with lower weight (ß=-0·056, P=0·043) and BMI (ß=-0·021, P=0·031) over the follow-up. This association was especially evident among those who had increased their BSDS. In conclusion, both high initial and improved adherence to the healthy Nordic diet may promote long-term weight maintenance. The self-reported/measured anthropometrics were shown to have high agreement with nurse-measured values which adds the credibility of our results.
PubMed ID
29936927 View in PubMed
Less detail

Appetitive traits as behavioural pathways in genetic susceptibility to obesity: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275595
Source
Sci Rep. 2015;5:14726
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Hanna Konttinen
Clare Llewellyn
Jane Wardle
Karri Silventoinen
Anni Joensuu
Satu Männistö
Veikko Salomaa
Pekka Jousilahti
Jaakko Kaprio
Markus Perola
Ari Haukkala
Source
Sci Rep. 2015;5:14726
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Appetite
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Multifactorial Inheritance
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Population Surveillance
Quantitative Trait, Heritable
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The mechanisms through which genes influence body weight are not well understood, but appetite has been implicated as one mediating pathway. Here we use data from two independent population-based Finnish cohorts (4632 adults aged 25-74 years from the DILGOM study and 1231 twin individuals aged 21-26 years from the FinnTwin12 study) to investigate whether two appetitive traits mediate the associations between known obesity-related genetic variants and adiposity. The results from structural equation modelling indicate that the effects of a polygenic risk score (90 obesity-related loci) on measured body mass index and waist circumference are partly mediated through higher levels of uncontrolled eating (ßindirect = 0.030-0.032, P
Notes
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Dec;90(6):1483-819828706
Cites: J Nutr. 2010 Apr;140(4):831-420181787
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;39(2):504-1819959603
Cites: PLoS Med. 2010;7(8). pii: e1000332. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.100033220824172
Cites: PLoS Genet. 2010 Sep;6(9):e100111320844574
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Oct;34(10):1538-4520386550
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Nov;92(5):1031-920861176
Cites: Psychol Health. 2011 Jan;26(1):23-3920204980
Cites: Am J Hum Biol. 2011 Nov-Dec;23(6):764-7321957002
Cites: PLoS Med. 2011 Nov;8(11):e100111622069379
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2011 Nov;53(11):1287-9322027541
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Dec;94(6):1562-722071702
Cites: Appetite. 2012 Feb;58(1):277-8422037008
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2012 Jun;14(6):720-3322241830
Cites: Nat Neurosci. 2012 Oct;15(10):1343-923007189
Cites: Hypertension. 2013 May;61(5):987-9423509078
Cites: PLoS Genet. 2013;9(7):e100360723935507
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2013 Sep 28;110(6):1151-623433430
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Nov;37(11):1506-923528754
Cites: J Genet Couns. 2014 Apr;23(2):179-8623832708
Cites: JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Apr;168(4):338-4424535189
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 May;22(5):E135-4123929626
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;19(11):1154-525266125
Cites: Diabetes. 2014 Dec;63(12):4343-5924969107
Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 2014 Dec 20;23(25):6961-7225104851
Cites: Appetite. 2015 Feb;85:138-4525464025
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2015 Feb;23(2):305-1225522302
Cites: Nature. 2015 Feb 12;518(7538):197-20625673413
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Dec 11;359(24):2558-6619073975
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Dec;24(12):1715-2511126230
Cites: Twin Res. 2002 Oct;5(5):366-7112537860
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2003 Nov;112(4):545-5714674868
Cites: J Nutr. 2004 Sep;134(9):2372-8015333731
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jul;88(1):22-918614720
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Aug;88(2):263-7118689360
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Sep;93(9):3640-318583465
Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 2008 Nov 15;17(22):3502-818697794
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Jan;33(1):42-518838977
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Mar;33(3):373-819153581
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Jun;33(6):611-2019399021
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jul;90(1):33-4019439461
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Oct;17(10):1964-7019360005
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Nov;90(5):1426-3219793853
PubMed ID
26423639 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between periodontal infection and obesity: results of the Health 2000 Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99741
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2010 Dec 27;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-27-2010
Author
Tuomas Saxlin
Pekka Ylöstalo
Liisa Suominen-Taipale
Satu Männistö
Matti Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland Finnish Doctoral Program of Oral Sciences (FINDOS), Turku, Finland Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2010 Dec 27;
Date
Dec-27-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Saxlin T, Ylöstalo P, Suominen-Taipale L, Männistö S, Knuuttila M. Association between periodontal infection and obesity: results of the Health 2000 Survey. J Clin Periodontol 2010; doi: 10.1111/j.1600-051X.2010.01677.x ABSTRACT: Aim: To investigate the role of periodontal infection in obesity in an adult population. Material and methods: This study was based on a subpopulation of the Health 2000 Survey that included dentate, non-diabetic subjects, aged 30-49 years (n=2784). Obesity was measured using the body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage (BF%) and waist circumference (WC). The extent of periodontal infection was measured using the number of teeth with deepened (4 mm deep or deeper) periodontal pockets and was categorized into four categories (0, 1-3, 4-6, 7 or more). Results: The number of teeth with deepened periodontal pockets was found to be associated with BMI in an exposure-response manner among the total study population. The association was found among men and women, and also among never-smokers. The number of teeth with deepened periodontal pockets was also associated with BF% and WC among never-smokers. Conclusion: Periodontal infection measured by means of the number of teeth with deepened periodontal pockets appears to be associated with obesity. However, no inferences about causality can be made and further studies are needed to clarify the possible role of periodontal infection in obesity.
PubMed ID
21198765 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between vitamin b12 levels and melancholic depressive symptoms: a Finnish population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259549
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:145
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jussi Seppälä
Hannu Koponen
Hannu Kautiainen
Johan G Eriksson
Olli Kampman
Jaana Leiviskä
Satu Männistö
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Heikki Oksa
Yrjö Ovaskainen
Merja Viikki
Mauno Vanhala
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:145
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Depression - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Abstract
An association between vitamin B12 levels and depressive symptoms (DS) has been reported in several epidemiological studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate vitamin B12 levels in population-based samples with melancholic or non-melancholic DS as the relationship between vitamin B12 levels and different subtypes of DS has not been evaluated in previous studies.
Subjects without previously known type 2 diabetes, aged 45-74 years were randomly selected from the National Population Register as a part of the Finnish diabetes prevention programme (FIN-D2D). The study population (N?=?2806, participation rate 62%) consisted of 1328 men and 1478 women. The health examinations were carried out between October and December 2007 according to the WHO MONICA protocol. The assessment of DS was based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, cut-off =10 points). A DSM-IV- criteria based summary score of melancholic items in the BDI was used in dividing the participants with DS (N?=?429) into melancholic (N?=?138) and non-melancholic DS (N?=?291) subgroups. In the statistical analysis we used chi-squared test, t-test, permutation test, analysis of covariance, multivariate logistic regression analysis and multinomial regression model.
The mean vitamin B12 level was 331±176 pmol/L in those without DS while the subjects with non-melancholic DS had a mean vitamin B12 level of 324 ± 135 pmol/L, and those with melancholic DS had the lowest mean vitamin B12 level of 292±112 pmol/L (p?
Notes
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 May;57(5):871-619484842
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Jan;121(1):80; author reply 8020059455
Cites: Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2009;30(5):564-7320035251
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2010 Jun;123(1-3):150-719698995
Cites: World J Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;11(6):834-920632843
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2010 Nov;72(9):862-7320841559
Cites: Prev Med. 2010 Dec;51(6):466-7020854837
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2011 Jan;34(1):71-620929992
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Oct;94(4):1079-8721900461
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2012 Feb;136(3):543-922119085
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2012 May;138(3):473-822353381
Cites: J Am Coll Nutr. 2000 Feb;19(1):68-7610682878
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2000 May;157(5):715-2110784463
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2000 Aug;69(2):228-3210896698
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2000 Sep;49(3):183-711110989
Cites: Clin Chim Acta. 2002 Dec;326(1-2):47-5912417096
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2002 Dec;159(12):2099-10112450964
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2003 Feb;73(3):245-5212547293
Cites: Psychother Psychosom. 2003 Mar-Apr;72(2):80-712601225
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2003 Jun;60(6):618-2612796225
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2004;58(1):49-5314985154
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2004 May;184:386-9215123501
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2003 Dec 2;3:1714641930
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2004 Sep;81(3):269-7315337331
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1979 Feb;59(2):145-52420034
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1988;41(2):105-143335877
Cites: Blood. 1990 Sep 1;76(5):871-812393714
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1991 Mar;39(3):252-72005338
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994 Jan;51(1):8-198279933
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1994 Apr;151(4):489-988147445
Cites: Aging (Milano). 1997 Aug;9(4):241-579359935
Cites: J Clin Psychol. 1999 Jan;55(1):117-2810100838
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1961 Jun;4:561-7113688369
Cites: Prev Med. 2004 Dec;39(6):1256-6615539065
Cites: Psychol Med. 2005 Apr;35(4):529-3815856723
Cites: Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;29(7):1103-1216109454
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2006 Oct;11(10):929-3316702975
Cites: Age Ageing. 2007 Mar;36(2):177-8317189285
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Apr;30(4):872-717392548
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Apr;66(2):101-1217515250
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;192(4):268-7418378986
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1907-1618930340
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2009 Feb;119(2):137-4219016666
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 2009 May 15;167(1-2):73-919346005
PubMed ID
23705786 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D with Liver Cancer Incidence and Chronic Liver Disease Mortality in Finnish Male Smokers of the ATBC Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303207
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2018 09; 27(9):1075-1082
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Date
09-2018
Author
Gabriel Y Lai
Jian-Bing Wang
Stephanie J Weinstein
Dominick Parisi
Ronald L Horst
Katherine A McGlynn
Satu Männistö
Demetrius Albanes
Neal D Freedman
Author Affiliation
Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. laigy@mail.nih.gov.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2018 09; 27(9):1075-1082
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Keywords
Biomarkers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Liver Diseases - blood - mortality
Liver Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Risk factors
Smokers - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Background: Although circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations were linked to liver cancer and chronic liver disease (CLD) in laboratory studies, few epidemiologic studies have addressed the associations.Methods: Within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, we measured 25(OH)D in baseline serum of 202 incident liver cancer cases and 225 CLD deaths that occurred during nearly 25 years of follow-up, and 427 controls. ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. We examined predetermined clinically defined cut-points, and season-specific and season-standardized quartiles.Results: Low serum 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with higher risk of liver cancer (
PubMed ID
29720370 View in PubMed
Less detail

The associations between chronotype, a healthy diet and obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288190
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2016;33(8):972-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Mirkka Maukonen
Noora Kanerva
Timo Partonen
Erkki Kronholm
Hanna Konttinen
Heini Wennman
Satu Männistö
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2016;33(8):972-81
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Data Collection
Diet
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland
Food Preferences
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Unhealthy diet has been associated with obesity. Evening type has been associated with unhealthier food and nutrient intake that could predict a higher risk of obesity among them as compared to morning type. However, thus far no study has examined the interrelationships between chronotype, a healthy diet and obesity. We examined whether a healthy diet mediates the association between chronotype and obesity and whether chronotype modifies the association between a healthy and obesity. The National FINRISK 2007 Study included 4421 subjects aged 25-74 years. Diet was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Baltic Sea diet score (BSDS), including nine dietary components, was used as a measure of adherence to a healthy Nordic diet. Weight, height, body fat percentage and waist circumference were measured, and body mass index values were calculated. Chronotype was assessed using a shortened version of Horne and Östberg's morningness-eveningness questionnaire (MEQ). The sum score calculated from MEQ was either used as a continuous variable or divided into tertiles of which the lowest tertile demonstrated evening preference and the highest tertile demonstrated morning preference. A series of regression analyses were conducted to determine whether the BSDS mediates the association between chronotype and obesity. Likelihood ratio test was used to determine whether chronotype modifies the association between the BSDS and the obesity measures. After testing the interaction, chronotype-stratified analysis for the association between the BSDS and obesity measures was determined by linear regression. Generally, the evening types had lower adherence to the BSDS and were more often smokers (men), physically inactive and had lower perceived health than the other chronotypes (p 0.05). No evidence that chronotype would modify the association between the BSDS and obesity was found either (p > 0.05).
PubMed ID
27246115 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and periodontal pocketing and gingival bleeding: results of a study in a non-smoking population in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277832
Source
J Periodontol. 2015 Jun;86(6):755-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Georgios N Antonoglou
Anna Liisa Suominen
Matti Knuuttila
Pekka Ylöstalo
Meeri Ojala
Satu Männistö
Jukka Marniemi
Annamari Lundqvist
Tellervo Tervonen
Source
J Periodontol. 2015 Jun;86(6):755-65
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Plaque Index
Dietary Supplements
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Gingival Hemorrhage - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Pocket - blood
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamins - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Apart from the effects of vitamin D on bone metabolism, it is also known for its immunomodulatory properties. However, so far, it is not clear whether serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] exerts any beneficial effect on the periodontium. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether the serum level of 25(OH)D is related to periodontal condition, measured by means of pocketing and gingival bleeding.
This cross-sectional study is based on a non-smoking subpopulation without diabetes of the Finnish Health 2000 Survey (N = 1,262). Periodontal condition was measured as the number of teeth with deep (=4 mm) periodontal pockets and the number of bleeding sextants per individual. Serum 25(OH)D level was determined by means of a standard laboratory measurement. Prevalence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Poisson regression models.
There were practically no associations between serum 25(OH)D level and teeth with deep (=4 mm) periodontal pockets or bleeding sextants. A somewhat lower proportion of teeth with deep periodontal pockets was found in higher serum 25(OH)D quintiles among individuals with a good oral hygiene level.
Serum 25(OH)D did not seem to be related to periodontal condition, measured as periodontal pocketing and gingival bleeding in this low-risk, low-25(OH)D status population.
PubMed ID
25762358 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations of common noncommunicable medical conditions and chronic diseases with chronotype in a population-based health examination study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289946
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2017; 34(4):462-470
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Syaron Basnet
Ilona Merikanto
Tuuli Lahti
Satu Männistö
Tiina Laatikainen
Erkki Vartiainen
Timo Partonen
Author Affiliation
a Department of Public Health Solutions , National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL) , Helsinki , Finland.
Source
Chronobiol Int. 2017; 34(4):462-470
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Sleep - physiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
Chronotype is an emerging predictor of health and longevity, and understanding its influence on chronic diseases is important for constructing conceptual models of long-term pathways to health. We assessed the associations of chronotype with health status in the general Finnish adult population. Our population-based data were derived from the National FINRISK 2012 study and consisted of 4414 participants, aged 25-74 years, living in Finland. As part of their health examination, participants were asked about their circadian preference to the daily activities (morningness-eveningness) and a diagnosis or treatment for a set of common noncommunicable medical conditions and chronic diseases during the past 12 months. We found that there were 1935 (43.8%) morning types (MTs) and 595 (13.5%) evening types (ETs) and that 1884 (42.7%) were intermediates. As compared with the MTs, the ETs had significantly greater odds for depression (OR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.52-3.90, p
PubMed ID
28282237 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations of the Baltic Sea diet with obesity-related markers of inflammation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256511
Source
Ann Med. 2014 Mar;46(2):90-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Noora Kanerva
Britt-Marie Loo
Johan G Eriksson
Jaana Leiviskä
Niina E Kaartinen
Antti Jula
Satu Männistö
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare , Helsinki and Turku , Finland.
Source
Ann Med. 2014 Mar;46(2):90-6
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Humans
Inflammation - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Life Style
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Abstract
Inflammation is an important contributor to the development of chronic diseases. We examined whether a healthy Nordic diet, also called the Baltic Sea diet, associates with lower concentrations of inflammatory markers.
We used two independent cross-sectional studies: the DILGOM study including Finnish participants aged 25-74 years (n = 4579), and the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study including individuals born at Helsinki University Central Hospital between 1934 and 1944 and who participated in a clinical examination in 2001-2004 (n = 1911). Both studies measured anthropometrics, drew blood, and assessed concentrations of leptin, high-molecular-weight adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor a, interleukin 6, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). A food frequency questionnaire was used to measure dietary intake over the past year and calculate the Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS).
In both studies, linear regression adjusting for age, sex, energy intake, lifestyle factors, obesity, statin medication, and upstream inflammatory markers revealed an inverse association between the BSDS and hs-CRP concentrations (P
PubMed ID
24447090 View in PubMed
Less detail

92 records – page 1 of 10.