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Source
Biogerontology. 2010 Dec 14;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-14-2010
Author
Timo E Strandberg
Sarianna Sipilä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences/Geriatrics, Oulu University Hospital, University of Oulu, Unit of General Practice, PO Box 5000, 90014, Oulu, Finland, timo.strandberg@oulu.fi.
Source
Biogerontology. 2010 Dec 14;
Date
Dec-14-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This paper describes current biogerontology research in Finland especially in the universities with professorships in gerontology/geriatrics. If biogerontology is broadly taken to include all research in basic mechanisms of normal ageing as well as age-related diseases, the most prevalent current topics include basic research in genetics, mitochondrial function, musculoskeletal physiology, neurodegenerative and vascular diseases. The research activity of each institute and their international collaboration is briefly described with examples focused on recent publications in the field of biogerontology.
PubMed ID
21161378 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birth size and childhood growth as determinants of physical functioning in older age: the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129768
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Dec 15;174(12):1336-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2011
Author
Mikaela B von Bonsdorff
Taina Rantanen
Sarianna Sipilä
Minna K Salonen
Eero Kajantie
Clive Osmond
David J P Barker
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Centre, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. mikaela.vonbonsdorff@jyu.fi
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Dec 15;174(12):1336-44
Date
Dec-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Birth weight
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures
Breast Feeding
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Growth
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The study reports on the associations of infant and childhood anthropometric measurements, early growth, and the combined effect of birth weight and childhood body mass index with older age physical functioning among 1,999 individuals born in 1934-1944 and belonging to the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. Physical functioning was assessed by the Short Form 36 scale. Anthropometric data from infancy and childhood were retrieved from medical records. The risk of lower Short Form 36 physical functioning at the mean age of 61.6 years was increased for those with birth weight less than 2.5 kg compared with those weighing 3.0-3.5 kg at birth (odds ratio (OR) = 2.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57, 4.72). The gain in weight from birth to age 2 years was associated with decreased risk of lower physical functioning for a 1-standard deviation increase (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75, 0.94). The risk of lower physical functioning was highest for individuals with birth weight in the lowest third and body mass index at 11 years of age in the highest third compared with those whose birth weight was in the middle third and body mass index at age 11 years was in the highest third (OR = 3.08, 95% CI: 1.83, 5.19). The increasing prevalence of obesity at all ages and the aging of populations warrant closer investigation of the role of weight trajectories in old age functional decline.
PubMed ID
22071586 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body fat and mobility are explained by common genetic and environmental influences in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157662
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Alfredo Ortega-Alonso
Sarianna Sipilä
Urho M Kujala
Jaakko Kaprio
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. alfredo.ortega@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1616-21
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adiposity - genetics
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - genetics
Electric Impedance
Environment
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Locomotion - genetics
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Models, Genetic
Obesity - genetics - physiopathology
Physical Endurance - genetics
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Walking
Abstract
In older adults, mobility limitations often coexist with overweight or obesity, suggesting that similar factors may underlie both traits. This study examined the extent to which genetic and environmental influences explain the association between adiposity and mobility in older women. Body fat percentage (bioimpedance test), walking speed over 10 m, and distance walked in a 6-min test were evaluated in 92 monozygotic (MZ) and 104 dizygotic (DZ) pairs of twin sisters reared together, aged 63-76 years. Genetic and environmental influences on each trait were estimated using age-adjusted multivariate genetic modeling. The analyses showed that the means (and s.d.) for body fat percentage, walking speed, and walking endurance were 33.2+/-7.3%, 1.7+/-0.3 m/s and 529.7+/-75.4 m, respectively. The phenotypic correlation between adiposity and walking speed was -0.32 and between adiposity and endurance it was -0.33. Genetic influences explained 80% of the association between adiposity and speed, and 65% of adiposity and walking endurance. Cross-trait genetic influences accounted for 12% of the variability in adiposity, 56% in walking speed, and 34% in endurance. Trait-specific genetic influences were also detected for adiposity (54%) and walking endurance (13%), but not speed. In conclusion, among community-living older women, an inverse association was found between adiposity and mobility that was mostly due to the effect of shared genes. This result suggests that the identification of genetic variants for body fat metabolism may also provide understanding of the development of mobility limitations in older women.
PubMed ID
18421266 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differences in muscle and adipose tissue gene expression and cardio-metabolic risk factors in the members of physical activity discordant twin pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140570
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(9)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Tuija Leskinen
Rita Rinnankoski-Tuikka
Mirva Rintala
Tuulikki Seppänen-Laakso
Eija Pöllänen
Markku Alen
Sarianna Sipilä
Jaakko Kaprio
Vuokko Kovanen
Paavo Rahkila
Matej Oresic
Heikki Kainulainen
Urho M Kujala
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(9)
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Aged
Cholesterol, HDL - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Energy Metabolism
Female
Finland
Gene Expression Regulation
Heart Diseases - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism - physiopathology
Humans
Lipid Metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism
Risk factors
Twins - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
High physical activity/aerobic fitness predicts low morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to identify the most up-regulated gene sets related to long-term physical activity vs. inactivity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissues and to obtain further information about their link with cardio-metabolic risk factors. We studied ten same-sex twin pairs (age range 50-74 years) who had been discordant for leisure-time physical activity for 30 years. The examinations included biopsies from m. vastus lateralis and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. RNA was analyzed with the genome-wide Illumina Human WG-6 v3.0 Expression BeadChip. For pathway analysis we used Gene Set Enrichment Analysis utilizing active vs. inactive co-twin gene expression ratios. Our findings showed that among the physically active members of twin pairs, as compared to their inactive co-twins, gene expression in the muscle tissue samples was chronically up-regulated for the central pathways related to energy metabolism, including oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism and supportive metabolic pathways. Up-regulation of these pathways was associated in particular with aerobic fitness and high HDL cholesterol levels. In fat tissue we found physical activity-associated increases in the expression of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and branched-chain amino acid degradation gene sets both of which associated with decreased 'high-risk' ectopic body fat and plasma glucose levels. Consistent with other findings, plasma lipidomics analysis showed up-regulation of the triacylglycerols containing the polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our findings identified skeletal muscle and fat tissue pathways which are associated with the long-term physical activity and reduced cardio-metabolic disease risk, including increased aerobic fitness. In particular, improved skeletal muscle oxidative energy and lipid metabolism as well as changes in adipocyte function and redistribution of body fat are associated with reduced cardio-metabolic risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20862330 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do Associations Between Perceived Environmental and Individual Characteristics and Walking Limitations Depend on Lower Extremity Performance Level?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291084
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Ritva Sakari
Merja Rantakokko
Erja Portegijs
Susanne Iwarsson
Sarianna Sipilä
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
1 University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.
Source
J Aging Health. 2017 Jun; 29(4):640-656
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Environment
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Independent living
Interviews as Topic
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Mobility Limitation
Perception
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze whether the associations between perceived environmental and individual characteristics and perceived walking limitations in older people differ between those with intact and those with poorer lower extremity performance.
Persons aged 75 to 90 ( N = 834) participated in interviews and performance tests in their homes. Standard questionnaires were used to obtain walking difficulties; environmental barriers to and, facilitators of, mobility; and perceived individual hindrances to outdoor mobility. Lower extremity performance was tested using Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB).
Among those with poorer lower extremity performance, the likelihood for advanced walking limitations was, in particular, related to perceived poor safety in the environment, and among those with intact performance to perceived social issues, such as lack of company, as well as to long distances.
The environmental correlates of walking limitations seem to depend on the level of lower extremity performance.
PubMed ID
27056910 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does telomere length predict decline in physical functioning in older twin sisters during an 11-year follow-up?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278105
Source
Age (Dordr). 2016 Apr;38(2):34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Elina Sillanpää
Timo Törmäkangas
Taina Rantanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Sarianna Sipilä
Source
Age (Dordr). 2016 Apr;38(2):34
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Disease Progression
Diseases in Twins - metabolism - mortality - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Leukocytes - metabolism
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity
Survival Rate - trends
Telomere - physiology
Twins
Abstract
Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is known to be associated with mortality, but its association with age-related decline in physical functioning and the development of disability is less clear. This study examined the associations between LTL and physical functioning, and investigated whether LTL predicts level of physical functioning over an 11-year follow-up. Older mono- (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin sisters (n = 386) participated in the study. Relative LTL was measured by qPCR at baseline. Physical functioning was measured by 6-min walking distance and level of physical activity (PA). Walking distance was measured at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. PA was assessed by questionnaire at baseline and at 3- and 11-year follow-ups. The baseline analysis was performed with path models, adjusted with age and within-pair dependence of twin pairs. The longitudinal analysis was performed with a repeated measures linear model adjusted for age and longitudinal within-pair dependence. A nonrandom missing data analysis was utilized. At baseline, in all individuals, LTL was associated with PA (est. 0.14, SE 0.06, p = 0.011), but not with walking distance. Over the follow-up, a borderline significant association was observed between LTL and walking distance (est. 0.14, SE 0.07, p = 0.060) and a significant association between LTL and PA (est. 0.19, SE 0.06, p = 0.001). The results suggest that LTL is associated with PA and may, therefore, serve as a biomarker predicting the development of disability. Longitudinal associations between LTL and PA were observed only when nonrandom data missingness was taken into account in the analysis.
PubMed ID
26940017 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of 12-month home-based physiotherapy on duration of living at home and functional capacity among older persons with signs of frailty or with a recent hip fracture - protocol of a randomized controlled trial (HIPFRA study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295229
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 Oct 01; 18(1):232
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2018
Author
Paula Soukkio
Sara Suikkanen
Sanna Kääriä
Hannu Kautiainen
Sarianna Sipilä
Katriina Kukkonen-Harjula
Markku Hupli
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation, South Karelia Social and Health Care District, Valto Käkelän katu 3, FI-53130, Lappeenranta, Finland. paula.soukkio@eksote.fi.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 Oct 01; 18(1):232
Date
Oct-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Health concerns, such as frailty and osteoporotic fractures decrease functional capacity and increase use of health and social care services in the aging population. The ability to continue living at home is dependent on functional capacity, which can be enhanced by rehabilitation. We study the effects of a 12-month home-based physiotherapy program with 12-month follow-up on duration of living at home, functional capacity, and the use of social and health care services among older persons with signs of frailty, or with a recently operated hip fracture.
This is a non-blinded, parallel group, randomized controlled trial performed in South Karelia Social and Health Care District, Finland (population 131,000). Three hundred community-dwelling older persons with signs of frailty (age?=?65) and 300 persons with a recent hip fracture (age?=?60) will be recruited. Frailty is screened by FRAIL questionnaire and verified by modified Fried's frailty criteria. Both patient groups will be randomized separately to a physiotherapy and a usual care arm. Individualized, structured and progressive physiotherapy will be carried out for 60 min, twice a week for 12 months at the participant's home. The primary outcome at 24 months is duration of living at home. Our hypothesis is that persons assigned to the physiotherapy arm will live at home for six months longer than those in the usual care arm. Secondary outcomes are functional capacity, frailty status, health-related quality-of-life, falls, use and costs of social and health care services, and mortality. Assessments, among others Short Physical Performance Battery, Functional Independence Measure, Mini Nutritional Assessment, and Mini-Mental State Examination will be performed at the participant's home at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Register data on the use and costs of social and health care services, and mortality will be monitored for 24 months.
Our trial will provide new knowledge on the potential of intensive, long-term home-based physiotherapy among older persons at risk for disabilities, to enhance functional capacity and thereby to postpone the need for institutional care, and diminish the use of social and health care services.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02305433 , Registered Nov 28, 2014.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30285645 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of 12-month home-based physiotherapy on duration of living at home and functional capacity among older persons with signs of frailty or with a recent hip fracture - protocol of a randomized controlled trial (HIPFRA study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301757
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 10 01; 18(1):232
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Paula Soukkio
Sara Suikkanen
Sanna Kääriä
Hannu Kautiainen
Sarianna Sipilä
Katriina Kukkonen-Harjula
Markku Hupli
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation, South Karelia Social and Health Care District, Valto Käkelän katu 3, FI-53130, Lappeenranta, Finland. paula.soukkio@eksote.fi.
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2018 10 01; 18(1):232
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Frail Elderly - psychology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Home Care Services - trends
Humans
Independent Living - psychology - trends
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Physical Therapy Modalities - psychology - trends
Quality of Life - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Health concerns, such as frailty and osteoporotic fractures decrease functional capacity and increase use of health and social care services in the aging population. The ability to continue living at home is dependent on functional capacity, which can be enhanced by rehabilitation. We study the effects of a 12-month home-based physiotherapy program with 12-month follow-up on duration of living at home, functional capacity, and the use of social and health care services among older persons with signs of frailty, or with a recently operated hip fracture.
This is a non-blinded, parallel group, randomized controlled trial performed in South Karelia Social and Health Care District, Finland (population 131,000). Three hundred community-dwelling older persons with signs of frailty (age?=?65) and 300 persons with a recent hip fracture (age?=?60) will be recruited. Frailty is screened by FRAIL questionnaire and verified by modified Fried's frailty criteria. Both patient groups will be randomized separately to a physiotherapy and a usual care arm. Individualized, structured and progressive physiotherapy will be carried out for 60 min, twice a week for 12 months at the participant's home. The primary outcome at 24 months is duration of living at home. Our hypothesis is that persons assigned to the physiotherapy arm will live at home for six months longer than those in the usual care arm. Secondary outcomes are functional capacity, frailty status, health-related quality-of-life, falls, use and costs of social and health care services, and mortality. Assessments, among others Short Physical Performance Battery, Functional Independence Measure, Mini Nutritional Assessment, and Mini-Mental State Examination will be performed at the participant's home at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Register data on the use and costs of social and health care services, and mortality will be monitored for 24 months.
Our trial will provide new knowledge on the potential of intensive, long-term home-based physiotherapy among older persons at risk for disabilities, to enhance functional capacity and thereby to postpone the need for institutional care, and diminish the use of social and health care services.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02305433 , Registered Nov 28, 2014.
PubMed ID
30285645 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program on the biochemical composition and morphology of cartilage in women with mild knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115536
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013;14:82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Benjamin Waller
Matti Munukka
Juhani Multanen
Timo Rantalainen
Tapani Pöyhönen
Miika T Nieminen
Ilkka Kiviranta
Hannu Kautiainen
Harri Selänne
Joost Dekker
Sarianna Sipilä
Urho M Kujala
Arja Häkkinen
Ari Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. ben.waller@jyu.fi
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013;14:82
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Biomechanical Phenomena
Body Composition
Cartilage, Articular - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
Contrast Media - diagnostic use
Female
Finland
Humans
Immersion
Knee Joint - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Knee - diagnosis - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology - therapy
Pain Measurement
Physical Examination
Postmenopause
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Research Design
Resistance Training - methods
Severity of Illness Index
Swimming Pools
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee result in decreased function, loss of working capacity and extensive social and medical costs. There is a need to investigate and develop effective interventions to minimise the impact of and even prevent the progression of osteoarthritis. Aquatic exercise has been shown to be effective at reducing the impact of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article is to describe the rationale, design and intervention of a study investigating the effect of an aquatic resistance exercise intervention on cartilage in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis.
A minimum of 80 volunteers who meet the inclusion criteria will be recruited from the local population through newspaper advertisements. Following initial assessment volunteers will be randomised into two groups. The intervention group will participate in a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program of 1-hour duration 3 times a week for four months. The control group will be asked to maintain normal care during this period. Primary outcome measure for this study is the biochemical composition of knee cartilage measured using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging; T2 relaxation time and delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. In addition, knee cartilage morphology as regional cartilage thickness will be studied. Secondary outcomes include measures of body composition and bone traits using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography, pain, function using questionnaires and physical performance tests and quality of life. Measurements will be performed at baseline, after the 4-month intervention period and at one year follow up.
This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program has on the biochemical composition of cartilage in post-menopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. This is the first study to investigate what impact aquatic exercise has on human articular cartilage. In addition it will investigate the effect aquatic exercise has on physical function, pain, bone and body composition and quality of life. The results of this study will help optimise the prescription of aquatic exercise to persons with mild knee osteoarthritis.
ISRCTN65346593.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23497162 View in PubMed
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Effects of comprehensive geriatric assessment and targeted intervention on mobility in persons aged 75 years and over: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130396
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2012 Apr;26(4):314-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Katri Lihavainen
Sarianna Sipilä
Taina Rantanen
Markku Kauppinen
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Centre, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. katri.lihavainen@jyu.fi
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2012 Apr;26(4):314-26
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Counseling
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Health status
Humans
Individualized Medicine
Male
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity
Musculoskeletal Pain - diagnosis
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Resistance Training
Abstract
To assess the effect of a comprehensive geriatric assessment and individually tailored intervention on mobility in older people. In addition, the effectiveness of the geriatric intervention was evaluated among a subgroup of persons with musculoskeletal pain.
Three-year geriatric development project with randomized assignment to intervention and control group.
Research centre, community and assisted living facilities.
Seven hundred and eighty-one Finnish persons aged 75-98 years were assigned to an intervention (n = 404) or control (n = 377) group.
A comprehensive geriatric assessment with a multifactorial intervention lasting two years. The intervention included individualized referrals, recommendations, physical activity counselling and supervised resistance training.
Perceived limitation in walking 400m was gathered annually during the intervention and at the one-year post-intervention follow-up.
The proportion of persons with mobility limitation at the beginning, at the two-year intervention and at the one-year post-intervention follow-up was 16%, 15%, 12% and 14%, respectively, in the intervention group. In the control group, the corresponding proportions were 19%, 18%, 23% and 26%. The treatment effect was significant at the end of the two-year intervention (odds ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.70-0.96, P = 0.013), and at the one-year post-intervention follow-up (0.84, 0.75-0.94, P = 0.002). The parallel positive effect of the intervention on mobility was even greater among persons with musculoskeletal pain.
The comprehensive geriatric assessment and individually tailored multifactorial intervention had a positive effect on mobility, underlining their importance in health promotion and disability prevention in older people.
PubMed ID
22007041 View in PubMed
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