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Children with specific language impairment in Finnish: the use of tense and agreement inflections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137452
Source
J Child Lang. 2011 Nov;38(5):999-1027
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Sari Kunnari
Tuula Savinainen-Makkonen
Laurence B Leonard
Leena Mäkinen
Anna-Kaisa Tolonen
Mirja Luotonen
Eeva Leinonen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Humanities, Logopedics, University of Oulu, Finland. sari.kunnari@oulu.fi
Source
J Child Lang. 2011 Nov;38(5):999-1027
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Language
Language Development Disorders - psychology
Male
Phonetics
Semantics
Abstract
Children with specific language impairment (SLI) vary widely in their ability to use tense/agreement inflections depending on the type of language being acquired, a fact that current accounts of SLI have tried to explain. Finnish provides an important test case for these accounts because: (1) verbs in the first and second person permit null subjects whereas verbs in the third person do not; and (2) tense and agreement inflections are agglutinating and thus one type of inflection can appear without the other. Probes were used to compare the verb inflection use of Finnish-speaking children with SLI, and both age-matched and younger typically developing children. The children with SLI were less accurate, and the pattern of their errors did not match predictions based on current accounts of SLI. It appears that children with SLI have difficulty learning complex verb inflection paradigms apart from any problem specific to tense and agreement.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21281548 View in PubMed
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Expressive Language Skills in Finnish Two-Year-Old Extremely- and Very-Low-Birth-Weight Preterm Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101630
Source
Folia Phoniatr Logop. 2012;64(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Sari Kunnari
Anneli Yliherva
Leila Paavola
Outi M Peltoniemi
Author Affiliation
Logopedics, Faculty of Humanities, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Folia Phoniatr Logop. 2012;64(1):5-11
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objective: Preterm children with low birth weight are at greater risk of experiencing speech and language difficulties than full-term children. The aim of the current study was to investigate expressive language skills of Finnish-speaking preterm children with low birth weight [extremely-low-birth-weight (ELBW) children: n = 8; very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) children: n = 10] at 2 years of corrected age and to compare their language results with full-term controls (n = 18), using spontaneous speech samples. Methods: The children were video recorded in semistructured free-play sessions with their mothers. From these video samples, expressive vocabulary size and maximum sentence length (MSL) were analyzed. In addition, the possible effect of children's gender on language measures as well as associations between different language measures were examined. Results: The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the preterm and full-term groups in the size of expressive vocabulary. In contrast, the MSL, which measures morphosyntactic skills, was significantly shorter in preterm children. A positive correlation was found between MSL and expressive vocabulary. Children's gender was not associated with language skills measured. Conclusion: The findings indicate that Finnish-speaking preterm children, especially ELBW children, experience difficulties in morphosyntactic skills.
PubMed ID
21701186 View in PubMed
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Linguistic and pragmatic aspects of narration in Finnish typically developing children and children with specific language impairment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259047
Source
Clin Linguist Phon. 2014 Jun;28(6):413-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Leena Mäkinen
Soile Loukusa
Päivi Laukkanen
Eeva Leinonen
Sari Kunnari
Source
Clin Linguist Phon. 2014 Jun;28(6):413-27
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Child
Child Development
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Cognition
Emotions
Female
Finland
Humans
Language
Language Development
Language Development Disorders - psychology
Language Tests
Male
Narration
Speech Production Measurement
Abstract
This study investigates narratives of Finnish children with specific language impairment (SLI) from linguistic and pragmatic perspectives, in order to get a comprehensive overview of these children's narrative abilities. Nineteen children with SLI (mean age 6;1 years) and 19 typically developing age-matched children participated in the study. Their picture-elicited narrations were analysed for linguistic productivity and complexity, grammatical and referential accuracy, event content, the use of mental state expressions and narrative comprehension. Children with SLI showed difficulties in every aspect of narration in comparison to their peers. Only one measure of productivity, the number of communication units, did not reach statistical significance. Not only was linguistic structure fragile but also pragmatic aspects of storytelling (referencing, event content, mental state expressions and inferencing) were demanding for children with SLI. Results suggest that pragmatic aspects of narration should be taken into account more often when assessing narrative abilities of children with SLI.
PubMed ID
24446795 View in PubMed
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Phonological mean length of utterance in specific language impairment: a multi-case study of children acquiring Finnish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125366
Source
Clin Linguist Phon. 2012 May;26(5):428-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Sari Kunnari
Katri Saaristo-Helin
Tuula Savinainen-Makkonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Logopedics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. katri.saaristo@helsinki.fi
Source
Clin Linguist Phon. 2012 May;26(5):428-44
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apraxias - physiopathology
Articulation Disorders - physiopathology
Child
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Language
Language Development
Language Development Disorders - physiopathology
Male
Phonetics
Speech Production Measurement
Abstract
This study assesses the phonological development of four Finnish-speaking children (ages 4;8, 4;9, 4;9 and 5;5) with specific language impairment (SLI) and dyspractic features in speech. The analysis is performed using the phonological mean length of utterance (pMLU) method. Moreover, the children's phonological abilities are evaluated qualitatively in relation to segments, phonotactics and word structure. The results are compared with those obtained from four age-matched typically developing peers and with the data from an earlier study using the pMLU method on younger, typically developing Finnish children. In the pMLU analysis, the children with SLI performed roughly at the level of typically developing 2-year-old children. The qualitative analyses revealed that children with SLI had difficulties in producing word-medial clusters and word-initial consonants and that they exhibited frequent consonant assimilations, infrequent errors and vowel errors. The pMLU method did differentiate between children with SLI and typically developing children. However, qualitative analyses revealed some weaknesses of the pMLU method when assessing Finnish children with SLI.
PubMed ID
22489735 View in PubMed
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The Phonological Mean Length of Utterance: methodological challenges from a crosslinguistic perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170052
Source
J Child Lang. 2006 Feb;33(1):179-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Katri Saaristo-Helin
Tuula Savinainen-Makkonen
Sari Kunnari
Author Affiliation
Department of Speech Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland. Katri.Saaristo@helsinki.fi
Source
J Child Lang. 2006 Feb;33(1):179-90
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Male
Phonetics
Speech Production Measurement
Abstract
The present study assesses the phonological development of 17 children acquiring Finnish at the developmental point of 25 words (ages 1; 2-2;0). The analysis is made using the PHONOLOGICAL MEAN LENGTH OF UTTERANCE (PMLU) method (Ingram & Ingram, 2001; Ingram, 2002), which focuses on the children's whole-word productions. Two separate analyses are carried out: the first analysis concentrates on consonants and follows the procedure devised by Ingram and Ingram (2001), and the second analysis also scores the correctness of vowels. The PMLU results of both analyses are found to be much higher than those reported for children acquiring English. The results show the apparent need for more language-specific research in order to develop the PMLU method suitable for various language environments.
PubMed ID
16566326 View in PubMed
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The use of negative inflections by Finnish-speaking children with and without specific language impairment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263047
Source
Clin Linguist Phon. 2014 Sep;28(9):697-708
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Sari Kunnari
Tuula Savinainen-Makkonen
Laurence B Leonard
Leena Mäkinen
Anna-Kaisa Tolonen
Source
Clin Linguist Phon. 2014 Sep;28(9):697-708
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Language Development
Language Development Disorders - diagnosis
Language Tests - statistics & numerical data
Linguistics
Male
Phonetics
Reference Values
Speech Acoustics
Speech Production Measurement
Abstract
Children with specific language impairment (SLI) have difficulty expressing subject-verb agreement. However, in many languages, tense is fused with agreement, making it difficult to attribute the problem to agreement in particular. In Finnish, negative markers are function words that agree with the subject in person and number but do not express tense, providing an opportunity to assess the status of agreement in a more straightforward way. Fifteen Finnish-speaking preschoolers with SLI, 15 age controls and 15 younger controls responded to items requiring negative markers in first person singular and plural, and third person singular and plural. The children with SLI were less accurate than both typically developing groups. However, their problems were limited to particular person-number combinations. Furthermore, the children with SLI appeared to have difficulty selecting the form of the lexical verb that should accompany the negative marker, suggesting that agreement was not the sole difficulty.
PubMed ID
24588468 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.