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Absence of association between the INSIG2 gene polymorphism (rs7566605) and obesity in the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95295
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Jul;17(7):1453-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Vimaleswaran Karani S
Franks Paul W
Brage Soren
Sardinha Luis B
Andersen Lars B
Wareham Nicholas J
Ekelund Ulf
Loos Ruth J F
Author Affiliation
MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge, UK.
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Jul;17(7):1453-7
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Estonia
Europe
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - genetics
Lipids - blood
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Obesity - blood - ethnology - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Waist Circumference - genetics
Abstract
The first genome-wide association study for BMI identified a polymorphism, rs7566605, 10 kb upstream of the insulin-induced gene 2 (INSIG2) transcription start site, as the most significantly associated variant in children and adults. Subsequent studies, however, showed inconsistent association of this polymorphism with obesity traits. This polymorphism has been hypothesized to alter INSIG2 expression leading to inhibition of fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis. Hence, we investigated the association of the INSIG2 rs7566605 polymorphism with obesity- and lipid-related traits in Danish and Estonian children (930 boys and 1,073 girls) from the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS), a school-based, cross-sectional study of pre- and early pubertal children. The association between the polymorphism and obesity traits was tested using additive and recessive models adjusted for age, age-group, gender, maturity and country. Interactions were tested by including the interaction terms in the model. Despite having sufficient power (98%) to detect the previously reported effect size for association with BMI, we did not find significant effects of rs7566605 on BMI (additive, P = 0.68; recessive, P = 0.24). Accordingly, the polymorphism was not associated with overweight (P = 0.87) or obesity (P = 0.34). We also did not find association with waist circumference (WC), sum of four skinfolds, or with total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, or high-density lipoprotein. There were no gender-specific (P = 0.55), age-group-specific (P = 0.63) or country-specific (P = 0.56) effects. There was also no evidence of interaction between genotype and physical activity (P = 0.95). Despite an adequately powered study, our findings suggest that rs7566605 is not associated with obesity-related traits and lipids in the EYHS.
PubMed ID
19197262 View in PubMed
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Correlates of objectively assessed physical activity and sedentary time in children: a cross-sectional study (The European Youth Heart Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94311
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:322
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Nilsson Andreas
Andersen Lars Bo
Ommundsen Yngvar
Froberg Karsten
Sardinha Luis B
Piehl-Aulin Karin
Ekelund Ulf
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. andreas.nilsson@oru.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:322
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Identifying leisure time activities performed before and after school that influence time in physical activity (PA) and/or time spent sedentary can provide useful information when designing interventions aimed to promote an active lifestyle in young people. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between mode of transportation to school, outdoor play after school, participation in exercise in clubs, and TV viewing with objectively assessed PA and sedentary behaviour in children. METHODS: A total of 1327 nine- and 15-year-old children from three European countries (Norway, Estonia, Portugal) participated as part of the European Youth Heart Study. PA was measured during two weekdays and two weekend days using the MTI accelerometer, and average percent of time in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and time spent sedentary were derived. Potential correlates were assessed by self-report. Independent associations between self-reported correlates with percent time in MVPA and percent time sedentary were analysed by general linear models, adjusted by age, gender, country, measurement period, monitored days and parental socio-economic status. RESULTS: In 9-year-olds, playing outdoors after school was associated with higher percent time in MVPA (P
PubMed ID
19735565 View in PubMed
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Fitness, fatness and clustering of cardiovascular risk factors in children from Denmark, Estonia and Portugal: the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86824
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2008;3 Suppl 1:58-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Andersen Lars B
Sardinha Luis B
Froberg Karsten
Riddoch Chris J
Page Angie S
Anderssen Sigmund A
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2008;3 Suppl 1:58-66
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - physiology
Adolescent
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Cluster analysis
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Estonia - epidemiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Odds Ratio
Physical Fitness - physiology
Portugal - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Skinfold thickness
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Levels of overweight have increased and fitness has decreased in children. Potentially, these changes may be a threat to future health. Numerous studies have measured changes in body mass index (BMI), but few have assessed the independent effects of low fitness, overweight and physical inactivity on cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional multi-center study including 1 769 children from Denmark, Estonia and Portugal. The main outcome was clustering of CVD risk factors. Independent variables were waist circumference, skinfolds, physical activity and cardio-respiratory fitness. RESULTS: Both waist circumference and skinfolds were associated with clustered CVD risk. Odds ratios for clustered CVD risk for the upper quartiles compared with the lowest quartile were 9.13 (95% CI: 5.78-14.43) and 11.62 (95% CI: 7.11-18.99) when systolic blood pressure, triglyceride, insulin resistance homeostasis assessment model (HOMA) score, cholesterol:HDL, and fitness were included in the score. When fitness was removed from the clustered risk variable, the association for fatness attenuated and after further adjustment for fitness, only the highest quartiles of the fatness parameters were significant. Fitness showed the same strength of association with the clustered risk score including systolic blood pressure, triglyceride, HOMA score, and cholesterol:HDL with odds ratio for the upper quartile of 4.97 (95% CI: 3.20-7.73). Physical activity was associated with clustered risk even after adjustment for fitness and fatness with an odds ratio for the upper quartile of 1.81 (95% CI: 1.18-2.76). CONCLUSION: Physical activity, fitness, skinfold and waist circumference were all independently associated with clustered CVD risk.
PubMed ID
18278634 View in PubMed
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Physical activity and clustered cardiovascular risk in children: a cross-sectional study (The European Youth Heart Study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81368
Source
Lancet. 2006 Jul 22;368(9532):299-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-2006
Author
Andersen Lars Bo
Harro Maarike
Sardinha Luis B
Froberg Karsten
Ekelund Ulf
Brage Søren
Anderssen Sigmund Alfred
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway. lars.bo.andersen@nih.no
Source
Lancet. 2006 Jul 22;368(9532):299-304
Date
Jul-22-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Physical Fitness
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis develops from early childhood; physical activity could positively affect this process. This study's aim was to assess the associations of objectively measured physical activity with clustering of cardiovascular disease risk factors in children and derive guidelines on the basis of this analysis. METHODS: We did a cross-sectional study of 1732 randomly selected 9-year-old and 15-year-old school children from Denmark, Estonia, and Portugal. Risk factors included in the composite risk factor score (mean of Z scores) were systolic blood pressure, triglyceride, total cholesterol/HDL ratio, insulin resistance, sum of four skinfolds, and aerobic fitness. Individuals with a risk score above 1 SD of the composite variable were defined as being at risk. Physical activity was assessed by accelerometry. FINDINGS: Odds ratios for having clustered risk for ascending quintiles of physical activity (counts per min; cpm) were 3.29 (95% CI 1.96-5.52), 3.13 (1.87-5.25), 2.51 (1.47-4.26), and 2.03 (1.18-3.50), respectively, compared with the most active quintile. The first to the third quintile of physical activity had a raised risk in all analyses. The mean time spent above 2000 cpm in the fourth quintile was 116 min per day in 9-year-old and 88 min per day in 15-year-old children. INTERPRETATION: Physical activity levels should be higher than the current international guidelines of at least 1 h per day of physical activity of at least moderate intensity to prevent clustering of cardiovascular disease risk factors.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2006 Jul 22;368(9532):261-216860679
Comment In: Lancet. 2006 Oct 14;368(9544):1326; author reply 1326-717046459
Comment In: Lancet. 2006 Oct 14;368(9544):1326; author reply 1326-717046460
ReprintIn: Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Nov 20;168(47):4101-317134609
PubMed ID
16860699 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and correlates of the metabolic syndrome in a population-based sample of European youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90966
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jan;89(1):90-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Ekelund Ulf
Anderssen Sigmund
Andersen Lars Bo
Riddoch Chris J
Sardinha Luis B
Luan Jian'an
Froberg Karsten
Brage Soren
Author Affiliation
Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge, UK. ue202@medschl.cam.ac.uk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jan;89(1):90-6
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth Weight - physiology
Body mass index
Breast Feeding
Child
Child Nutritional Physiology Phenomena - physiology
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Europe
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Physical Fitness - physiology
Prevalence
Public Health
Risk factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Until recently, there has been no unified definition of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the youth. Therefore, the prevalence of MetS and its association with potential correlates are largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to quantify the prevalence, identify the correlates, and examine the independent associations between potential correlates with MetS. DESIGN: A population-based cohort study was conducted in 10- and 15-y-old youth from Estonia, Denmark, and Portugal (n = 3193). MetS was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation. Correlates included maternal socioeconomic status, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and prevalent diabetes and maternally reported child's birth weight and duration of breastfeeding. Data on sexual maturity, objectively measured physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, self-reported sports participation, television viewing, and regular play were collected for the children. RESULTS: The prevalence of MetS was 0.2% and 1.4% in 10- and 15-y-olds, respectively. Cardiorespiratory fitness (standardized odds ratio: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.75), physical activity (standardized odds ratio: 0.40; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.88), and maternal BMI (standardized odds ratio: 1.61; 95% CI: 1.11, 2.34) were all independently associated with MetS after adjustment for sex, age group, study location, birth weight, and sexual maturity. An increase in daily moderate-intensity physical activity by 10-20% was associated with a 33% lower risk of being categorized with MetS. CONCLUSIONS: High maternal BMI and low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness and physical activity independently contribute to the MetS and may be targets for future interventions. Relatively small increases in physical activity may significantly reduce the risk of MetS in healthy children.
PubMed ID
19056570 View in PubMed
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Screen-viewing and the home TV environment: the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92356
Source
Prev Med. 2008 Nov;47(5):525-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Jago Russell
Page Angie
Froberg Karsten
Sardinha Luis B
Klasson-Heggebø Lena
Andersen Lars B
Author Affiliation
Department of Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS81TP, UK. russ.jago@bris.ac.uk
Source
Prev Med. 2008 Nov;47(5):525-9
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior
Europe
Female
Health status
Housing
Humans
Life Style
Male
Obesity
Parent-Child Relations
Personal Autonomy
Television - utilization
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Examine if home environmental factors are associated with screen-viewing. METHODS: Data are for 2670, 3rd and 9th grade participants in Denmark, Portugal, Estonia and Norway collected between 1997 and 2000. Outcomes were spending >2 h after-school watching television (TV) and >1 h per day playing computer games. Child Autonomy and the home TV Environment were exposures. RESULTS: Each unit increase in Child Autonomy was associated with 9% increase in risk of watching more than 2 h of TV per day after school and a 19% increase in risk of spending more than an hour per day playing computer games. TV Environment was associated with a 31% per unit increase in risk of watching >2 h of TV after school and 11% increase in risk of spending >1 h playing computer games. CONCLUSIONS: A family environment in which after-school TV viewing is part of the home culture and homes where children have more autonomy over their own behavior are associated with an increased risk of watching >2 h of TV per day after school and spending more >1 h per day playing computer games. The home screen-viewing environment and Child Autonomy may be malleable targets for changing screen-viewing.
PubMed ID
18722400 View in PubMed
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TV viewing and physical activity are independently associated with metabolic risk in children: the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79293
Source
PLoS Med. 2006 Dec;3(12):e488
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Ekelund Ulf
Brage Søren
Froberg Karsten
Harro Maarike
Anderssen Sigmund A
Sardinha Luis B
Riddoch Chris
Andersen Lars Bo
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Unit, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Ulf.Ekelund@mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk
Source
PLoS Med. 2006 Dec;3(12):e488
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Estonia
Female
Humans
Male
Motor Activity
Obesity - epidemiology
Portugal
Risk Management
Television
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: TV viewing has been linked to metabolic-risk factors in youth. However, it is unclear whether this association is independent of physical activity (PA) and obesity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We did a population-based, cross-sectional study in 9- to 10-y-old and 15- to 16-y-old boys and girls from three regions in Europe (n = 1,921). We examined the independent associations between TV viewing, PA measured by accelerometry, and metabolic-risk factors (body fatness, blood pressure, fasting triglycerides, inverted high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, glucose, and insulin levels). Clustered metabolic risk was expressed as a continuously distributed score calculated as the average of the standardized values of the six subcomponents. There was a positive association between TV viewing and adiposity (p = 0.021). However, after adjustment for PA, gender, age group, study location, sexual maturity, smoking status, birth weight, and parental socio-economic status, the association of TV viewing with clustered metabolic risk was no longer significant (p = 0.053). PA was independently and inversely associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin (all p
Notes
Comment In: PLoS Med. 2006 Dec;3(12):e48117194185
PubMed ID
17194189 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.