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Individual variability in contaminants and physiological status in a resident Arctic seabird species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298869
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Jan 25; 249:191-199
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-25-2019
Author
Norith Eckbo
Céline Le Bohec
Victor Planas-Bielsa
Nicholas A Warner
Quentin Schull
Dorte Herzke
Sandrine Zahn
Ane Haarr
Geir W Gabrielsen
Katrine Borgå
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo, Department of Biosciences, Problemveien 7, 0315, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: norith.eckbo@ibv.uio.no.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Jan 25; 249:191-199
Date
Jan-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
While migratory seabirds dominate ecotoxicological studies within the Arctic, there is limited knowledge about exposure and potential effects from circulating legacy and emerging contaminants in species who reside in the high-Arctic all year round. Here, we focus on the case of the Mandt's Black guillemot (Cepphus grylle mandtii) breeding at Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (79.00°N, 11.66°E) and investigate exposure to legacy and emerging contaminants in relation to individual physiological status, i.e. body condition, oxidative stress and relative telomere length. Despite its benthic-inshore foraging strategy, the Black guillemot displayed overall similar contaminant concentrations in blood during incubation (?PCB11 (15.7?ng/g w.w.)?>??PFAS5 (9.9?ng/g w.w.)?>??Pesticides9 (6.7?ng/g w.w.)?>??PBDE4 (2.7?ng/g w.w.), and Hg (0.3 µg/g d.w.) compared to an Arctic migratory seabird in which several contaminant-related stress responses have been observed. Black guillemots in poorer condition tended to display higher levels of contaminants, higher levels of reactive oxygen metabolites, lower plasmatic antioxidant capacity, and shorter telomere lengths; however the low sample size restrict any strong conclusions. Nevertheless, our data suggests that nonlinear relationships with a threshold may exist between accumulated contaminant concentrations and physiological status of the birds. These findings were used to build a hypothesis to be applied in future modelling for describing how chronic exposure to contaminants may be linked to telomere dynamics.
PubMed ID
30889502 View in PubMed
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Individual variability in contaminants and physiological status in a resident Arctic seabird species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301923
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Jun; 249:191-199
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2019
Author
Norith Eckbo
Céline Le Bohec
Victor Planas-Bielsa
Nicholas A Warner
Quentin Schull
Dorte Herzke
Sandrine Zahn
Ane Haarr
Geir W Gabrielsen
Katrine Borgå
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo, Department of Biosciences, Problemveien 7, 0315, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: norith.eckbo@ibv.uio.no.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Jun; 249:191-199
Date
Jun-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Birds - metabolism - physiology
Charadriiformes - metabolism - physiology
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - metabolism
Mercury - metabolism
Svalbard
Abstract
While migratory seabirds dominate ecotoxicological studies within the Arctic, there is limited knowledge about exposure and potential effects from circulating legacy and emerging contaminants in species who reside in the high-Arctic all year round. Here, we focus on the case of the Mandt's Black guillemot (Cepphus grylle mandtii) breeding at Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (79.00°N, 11.66°E) and investigate exposure to legacy and emerging contaminants in relation to individual physiological status, i.e. body condition, oxidative stress and relative telomere length. Despite its benthic-inshore foraging strategy, the Black guillemot displayed overall similar contaminant concentrations in blood during incubation (?PCB11 (15.7?ng/g w.w.)?>??PFAS5 (9.9?ng/g w.w.)?>??Pesticides9 (6.7?ng/g w.w.)?>??PBDE4 (2.7?ng/g w.w.), and Hg (0.3 µg/g d.w.) compared to an Arctic migratory seabird in which several contaminant-related stress responses have been observed. Black guillemots in poorer condition tended to display higher levels of contaminants, higher levels of reactive oxygen metabolites, lower plasmatic antioxidant capacity, and shorter telomere lengths; however the low sample size restrict any strong conclusions. Nevertheless, our data suggests that nonlinear relationships with a threshold may exist between accumulated contaminant concentrations and physiological status of the birds. These findings were used to build a hypothesis to be applied in future modelling for describing how chronic exposure to contaminants may be linked to telomere dynamics.
PubMed ID
30889502 View in PubMed
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Organohalogenated contaminants in white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) nestlings: An assessment of relationships to immunoglobulin levels, telomeres and oxidative stress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266164
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2015 Sep 11;539:337-349
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2015
Author
Silja Sletten
Sophie Bourgeon
Bård-Jørgen Bårdsen
Dorte Herzke
Francois Criscuolo
Sylvie Massemin
Sandrine Zahn
Trond Vidar Johnsen
Jan Ove Bustnes
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2015 Sep 11;539:337-349
Date
Sep-11-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Biomagnifying organohalogenated compounds (OHCs) may have adverse effects on the health of birds, especially marine avian top predators that accumulate high OHC loads. Contaminants may impair the humoral immunity and also influence the antioxidant enzyme activity (i.e. oxidative stress). Moreover, physical conditions and oxidative stress during development may reduce telomere lengths, one of the main mechanisms explaining cell senescence. To examine the potential effects of environmental contaminants on physiological biomarkers of health, OHCs with different 'physicochemical' properties were related to immunoglobulin Y levels (IgY; humoral immunity), superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD) activity in blood plasma, and telomere length (measured in red blood cells) in individual 7-8weeks old nestlings (n=35) of white-tailed eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla) in the Norwegian Sub-Arctic. Different organochlorines (OCs) and perfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs) were measured in blood plasma of nestlings, demonstrating higher concentrations of the emerging contaminants (PFASs), notably perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), compared to legacy OCs. There were no relationships between the contaminant loads and plasma IgY levels. Moreover, differences between years were found for telomere lengths, but this was not related to contaminants and more likely a result of different developmental conditions. However, there were significant and negative relationships between the OC loadings and the SOD activity. This suggests that some legacy OCs challenge the antioxidant capacity in nestlings of white-tailed eagles.
PubMed ID
26367189 View in PubMed
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