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An automated high-throughput SPE micro-elution method for perfluoroalkyl substances in human serum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261154
Source
Anal Bioanal Chem. 2015 Mar 21;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-21-2015
Author
Sandra Huber
Jan Brox
Source
Anal Bioanal Chem. 2015 Mar 21;
Date
Mar-21-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
An automated high-throughput solid phase extraction (SPE) micro-elution method for 8 perfluorosulfonic acids, 11 perfluorocarboxylic acids and fluorooctane sulfonamide in human serum was developed. Importance was attached to the application of small volumes of reagents and solvents in addition to low sample volumes (50 µL) in order to save the highly valuable sample material for follow-up and other studies. Instrumental analysis was performed by ultra high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The recoveries of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were satisfactory and between 70 and 120 % for most of the compounds at the three investigated spike concentrations. Perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS) was slightly underestimated at high concentrations (20 ng/mL; 67 %), whereas perfluoropentanoate (PFPA), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) were overestimated with 134, 131 and 133 % respectively, at low spike concentrations (0.2 ng/mL). The precision of the method was below 20 % coefficient of variation (CV%) for all target compounds with the only exception of PFOS (22 %) at low spike concentrations. Method detection limits ranged from 0.006 to 0.34 ng/mL. High sensitivity, accuracy, repeatability and robustness have been demonstrated for an appropriate concentration range. The applicability for real samples was satisfactory demonstrated by analysis of 40 sera samples from the general population from Tromsø, Norway.
PubMed ID
25795026 View in PubMed
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A broad cocktail of environmental pollutants found in eggs of three seabird species from remote colonies in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268924
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2015 Jun;34(6):1296-308
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Sandra Huber
Nicholas A Warner
Torgeir Nygård
Mikael Remberger
Mikael Harju
Hilde T Uggerud
Lennart Kaj
Linda Hanssen
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2015 Jun;34(6):1296-308
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds - growth & development - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - metabolism
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis - metabolism
Metals, Heavy - analysis - metabolism
Norway
Ovum - chemistry
Pesticides - analysis - metabolism
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - metabolism
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis - metabolism
Principal Component Analysis
Abstract
Eggs of 3 seabird species, common eider (Somateria mollisima), European shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis aristotelis), and European herring gull (Larus argentatus), were surveyed for a broad range of legacy and emerging pollutants to assess chemical mixture exposure profiles of seabirds from the Norwegian marine environment. In total, 201 chemical substances were targeted for analysis ranging from metals, organotin compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and associated metabolites, chlorinated paraffins, chlorinated and nonchlorinated organic pesticides, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), dechlorane plus, octachlorostyrene, brominated flame retardants (BFRs), organophosphorous compounds, brominated and alkyl phenols, cyclic siloxanes, and phthalates. Of the chemicals targeted, 149 substances were found above the detection limits, with metals dominating the contaminant profile and comprising 60% of the total contaminant load. Polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, organophosphorous compounds, and PFAS were the dominant contaminant classes of organic pollutants found within the seabird species, with the highest loads occurring in herring gulls, followed by shag, and common eider. New generation pollutants (e.g., PFAS, organophosphorous compounds, and alkylphenols) were detected at similar or higher concentrations than the legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Time trends of reported concentrations of legacy POPs appear to have decreased in recent decades from the Norwegian coastal environment. Concentrations of detected pollutants do not appear to have a negative effect on seabird population development within the sampling area. Additional stress caused by pollutants, however, may affect seabird health more at the individual level.
PubMed ID
25728907 View in PubMed
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Characterisation of human exposure pathways to perfluorinated compounds--comparing exposure estimates with biomarkers of exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136887
Source
Environ Int. 2011 May;37(4):687-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Line S Haug
Sandra Huber
Georg Becher
Cathrine Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. line.smastuen.haug@fhi.no
Source
Environ Int. 2011 May;37(4):687-93
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - analysis - blood - metabolism
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Air Pollution, Indoor - statistics & numerical data
Alkanesulfonic Acids - analysis - blood - metabolism
Caprylates - analysis - blood - metabolism
Dust - analysis
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fluorocarbons - analysis - blood - metabolism
Humans
Infant
Milk, Human - metabolism
Norway
Abstract
Commercially used per- and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been widely detected in humans, but the sources of human exposure are not fully characterized. The objectives of this study were to assess the relative importance of different exposure pathways of PFCs in a group of Norwegians and compare estimated intakes with internal doses obtained through biomonitoring. Individual PFC intakes from multiple exposure sources for a study group of 41 Norwegian women were estimated using measured PFC concentrations in indoor air and house dust as well as information from food frequency questionnaires and PFC concentrations in Norwegian food. Food was generally the major exposure source, representing 67-84% of the median total intake for PFOA and 88-99% for PFOS using different dust ingestion rates and biotransformation factors of 'precursor' compounds. However, on an individual basis, the indoor environment accounted for up to around 50% of the total intake for several women. Significant positive associations between concentrations of PFCs in house dust and the corresponding serum concentrations underline the importance of indoor environment as an exposure pathway for PFCs. For breast-fed infants, breast milk was calculated to be the single most important source to PFCs by far. The estimated intakes were confirmed by comparing serum concentrations of PFOA and PFOS calculated using PK models, with the corresponding concentrations measured in serum. Even though food in general is the major source of exposure for PFCs, the indoor environment may be an important contributor to human exposure. This study provides valuable knowledge for risk assessment of PFCs and control strategies.
PubMed ID
21334069 View in PubMed
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Environmental pollutants in blood donors: The multicentre Norwegian donor study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307350
Source
Transfus Med. 2020 Jun; 30(3):201-209
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2020
Author
Maria Averina
Tor Hervig
Sandra Huber
Mette Kjaer
Einar K Kristoffersen
Bjørn Bolann
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Transfus Med. 2020 Jun; 30(3):201-209
Date
Jun-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The aim of this study was to measure blood concentrations of environmental pollutants in Norwegian donors and evaluate the risk of pollutant exposure through blood transfusions.
Transfused blood may be a potential source of exposure to heavy metals and organic pollutants and presents a risk to vulnerable patient groups such as premature infants.
Donors were randomly recruited from three Norwegian blood banks: in Bergen, Tromsø and Kirkenes. Selected heavy metals were measured in whole blood using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) were measured in serum by ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer (UHPLC-MS/MS).
Almost 18% of blood donors had lead concentrations over the limit suggested for transfusions in premature infants (0.09?µmol/L). About 11% of all donors had mercury concentrations over the suggested limit of 23.7 nmol/L. Cadmium was higher than the limit, 16?nmol/L, in 4% of donors. Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) concentrations were over the suggested limit of 0.91?ng/mL in 68% and 100% of the donors, respectively. PFAS concentrations and heavy metal concentrations increased with donor's age.
A considerable percentage of donors had lead, PFOS and PFOA concentrations over the suggested limits. In addition, at each study site, there were donors with high mercury and cadmium concentrations. Selecting young donors for transfusions or measurements of pollutants in donor blood may be a feasible approach to avoid exposure through blood transfusions to vulnerable groups of patients such as premature infants.
PubMed ID
31926037 View in PubMed
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Exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and dyslipidemia, hypertension and obesity in adolescents. The Fit Futures study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311730
Source
Environ Res. 2021 04; 195:110740
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2021
Author
Maria Averina
Jan Brox
Sandra Huber
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, 9038, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Community Medicine, UiT the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: maria.averina@unn.no.
Source
Environ Res. 2021 04; 195:110740
Date
04-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Alkanesulfonic Acids
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyslipidemias - chemically induced - epidemiology
Environmental Pollutants
Fluorocarbons
Humans
Hypertension - chemically induced - epidemiology
Norway
Obesity - chemically induced - epidemiology
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Abstract
Prevalence of obesity, hypertension and dyslipidemia has been increasing in children and adolescents worldwide. Exposure to environmental pollutants may contribute to this development. Our aim was to study associations between perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and dyslipidemia, hypertension and obesity in a population-based sample of adolescents.
Serum PFAS concentrations were measured in 940 adolescents, mean age 16.4 (SD 1.3) years, from the cross-sectional Fit Futures study by the UHPLC-MS/MS method. The following endpoints were used: hypertension (systolic blood pressure over 130 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure over 80 mmHg); obesity (body mass index over 2 z-score, WHO charts for adolescents); dyslipidemia (total cholesterol = 5.17 mmol/L, and/or LDL-cholesterol = 3.36 mmol/l, and/or apolipoprotein B = 1.10 g/L).
Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), perfluorodecanoate (PFDA) and perfluoroundecanoate (PFUnDA) serum concentrations were positively associated with apolipoprotein B, total- and LDL cholesterol. The highest vs. lowest quartiles of total PFAS (?PFAS), PFNA and PFDA concentrations were positively associated with the risk of dyslipidemia: OR 2.24 (95% CI 1.10-4.54), OR 2.30 (95% CI 1.16-4.57) and 2.36 (95% CI 1.08-5.16), respectively. The highest vs. lowest quartiles of ?PFAS, perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), PFOS, perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) concentrations were positively associated with the risk of hypertension: OR 1.91 (95% CI 1.12-3.26), OR 2.06 (95% CI 1.16-3.65), 1.86 (95% CI 1.08-3.19) and 2.08 (95% CI 1.17-3.69) respectively. PFHxS and perfluoroheptane sulfonate (PFHpS) concentrations were positively associated with obesity.
This cross-sectional study showed a possible link between several PFAS and dyslipidemia, hypertension and obesity in Norwegian adolescents.
PubMed ID
33460636 View in PubMed
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A first screening and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products in waste water, sludge, recipient water and sediment from Faroe Islands, Iceland and Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271919
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Apr 16;562:13-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-2016
Author
Sandra Huber
Mikael Remberger
Lennart Kaj
Martin Schlabach
Hrönn Ó Jörundsdóttir
Jette Vester
Mímir Arnórsson
Inge Mortensen
Richard Schwartson
Maria Dam
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Apr 16;562:13-25
Date
Apr-16-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A screening of a broad range of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products (PPCPs) in sub-arctic locations of the Faroe Islands (FO), Iceland (IS) and Greenland (GL) was conducted. In total 36 pharmaceuticals including some metabolites, and seven additives in personal care products were investigated in influent and effluent waters as well as sludge of waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) and in water and sediment of recipients. Concentrations and distribution patterns for PPCPs discharged via sewage lines (SLs) to the marine environment were assessed. Of the 36 pharmaceuticals or metabolites analysed 33 were found close to or above the limit of detection (LOD) in all or a part of the samples. All of the seven investigated additives in personal care products were detected above the LOD. Some of the analysed PPCPs occurred in every or almost every sample. Among these were diclofenac, ibuprofen, lidocaine, naproxen, metformin, citalopram, venlafaxine, amiloride, furosemide, metoprolol, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and cetrimonium salt (ATAC-C16). Additionally, the study encompasses ecotoxicological risk assessment of 2/3 of the analysed PPCPs in recipient and diluted effluent waters. For candesartan only a small margin to levels with inacceptable risks was observed in diluted effluent waters at two locations (FO). Chronical risks for aquatic organisms staying and/or living around WWTP effluent pipe-outlets were indicated for 17ß-estradiol and estriol in the three countries. Additives in PCPs were found to pose the largest risk to the aquatic environment. The surfactants CAPB and ATAC-C16 were found in concentrations resulting in risk factors up to 375 for CAPB and 165 for ATAC-C16 in recipients for diluted effluents from Iggia, Nuuk (GL) and Torshavn (FO) respectively. These results demonstrates a potentially high ecological risk stemming from discharge of surfactants as used in household and industrial detergents as well as additives in personal care products.
PubMed ID
27092417 View in PubMed
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A first screening and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products in waste water, sludge, recipient water and sediment from Faroe Islands, Iceland and Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289561
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 08 15; 562:13-25
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-15-2016
Author
Sandra Huber
Mikael Remberger
Lennart Kaj
Martin Schlabach
Hrönn Ó Jörundsdóttir
Jette Vester
Mímir Arnórsson
Inge Mortensen
Richard Schwartson
Maria Dam
Author Affiliation
NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Department of Environmental Chemistry, Fram- High North Research Centre on Climate and the Environment, NO-9296 Tromsø, Norway; University Hospital of North Norway, Division of Diagnostic Services, Department of Laboratory Medicine, NO-9038 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: sandra.huber@unn.no.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 08 15; 562:13-25
Date
08-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cosmetics - analysis
Denmark
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Greenland
Iceland
Pharmaceutical Preparations - analysis
Risk assessment
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Waste Water - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
A screening of a broad range of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products (PPCPs) in sub-arctic locations of the Faroe Islands (FO), Iceland (IS) and Greenland (GL) was conducted. In total 36 pharmaceuticals including some metabolites, and seven additives in personal care products were investigated in influent and effluent waters as well as sludge of waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) and in water and sediment of recipients. Concentrations and distribution patterns for PPCPs discharged via sewage lines (SLs) to the marine environment were assessed. Of the 36 pharmaceuticals or metabolites analysed 33 were found close to or above the limit of detection (LOD) in all or a part of the samples. All of the seven investigated additives in personal care products were detected above the LOD. Some of the analysed PPCPs occurred in every or almost every sample. Among these were diclofenac, ibuprofen, lidocaine, naproxen, metformin, citalopram, venlafaxine, amiloride, furosemide, metoprolol, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and cetrimonium salt (ATAC-C16). Additionally, the study encompasses ecotoxicological risk assessment of 2/3 of the analysed PPCPs in recipient and diluted effluent waters. For candesartan only a small margin to levels with inacceptable risks was observed in diluted effluent waters at two locations (FO). Chronical risks for aquatic organisms staying and/or living around WWTP effluent pipe-outlets were indicated for 17ß-estradiol and estriol in the three countries. Additives in PCPs were found to pose the largest risk to the aquatic environment. The surfactants CAPB and ATAC-C16 were found in concentrations resulting in risk factors up to 375 for CAPB and 165 for ATAC-C16 in recipients for diluted effluents from Iggia, Nuuk (GL) and Torshavn (FO) respectively. These results demonstrates a potentially high ecological risk stemming from discharge of surfactants as used in household and industrial detergents as well as additives in personal care products.
PubMed ID
27092417 View in PubMed
Less detail

A first screening and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products in waste water, sludge, recipient water and sediment from Faroe Islands, Iceland and Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289719
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 08 15; 562:13-25
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-15-2016
Author
Sandra Huber
Mikael Remberger
Lennart Kaj
Martin Schlabach
Hrönn Ó Jörundsdóttir
Jette Vester
Mímir Arnórsson
Inge Mortensen
Richard Schwartson
Maria Dam
Author Affiliation
NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Department of Environmental Chemistry, Fram- High North Research Centre on Climate and the Environment, NO-9296 Tromsø, Norway; University Hospital of North Norway, Division of Diagnostic Services, Department of Laboratory Medicine, NO-9038 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: sandra.huber@unn.no.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 08 15; 562:13-25
Date
08-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cosmetics - analysis
Denmark
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Greenland
Iceland
Pharmaceutical Preparations - analysis
Risk assessment
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Waste Water - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
A screening of a broad range of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products (PPCPs) in sub-arctic locations of the Faroe Islands (FO), Iceland (IS) and Greenland (GL) was conducted. In total 36 pharmaceuticals including some metabolites, and seven additives in personal care products were investigated in influent and effluent waters as well as sludge of waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) and in water and sediment of recipients. Concentrations and distribution patterns for PPCPs discharged via sewage lines (SLs) to the marine environment were assessed. Of the 36 pharmaceuticals or metabolites analysed 33 were found close to or above the limit of detection (LOD) in all or a part of the samples. All of the seven investigated additives in personal care products were detected above the LOD. Some of the analysed PPCPs occurred in every or almost every sample. Among these were diclofenac, ibuprofen, lidocaine, naproxen, metformin, citalopram, venlafaxine, amiloride, furosemide, metoprolol, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and cetrimonium salt (ATAC-C16). Additionally, the study encompasses ecotoxicological risk assessment of 2/3 of the analysed PPCPs in recipient and diluted effluent waters. For candesartan only a small margin to levels with inacceptable risks was observed in diluted effluent waters at two locations (FO). Chronical risks for aquatic organisms staying and/or living around WWTP effluent pipe-outlets were indicated for 17ß-estradiol and estriol in the three countries. Additives in PCPs were found to pose the largest risk to the aquatic environment. The surfactants CAPB and ATAC-C16 were found in concentrations resulting in risk factors up to 375 for CAPB and 165 for ATAC-C16 in recipients for diluted effluents from Iggia, Nuuk (GL) and Torshavn (FO) respectively. These results demonstrates a potentially high ecological risk stemming from discharge of surfactants as used in household and industrial detergents as well as additives in personal care products.
PubMed ID
27092417 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indoor air characterization of various microenvironments in the Arctic. The case of Tromsø, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260235
Source
Environ Res. 2014 Oct;134:1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Athanasios Katsoyiannis
Erik Eik Anda
Alessandra Cincinelli
Tania Martellini
Paolo Leva
Arntraut Goetsch
Torkjel M Sandanger
Sandra Huber
Source
Environ Res. 2014 Oct;134:1-7
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Arctic Regions
Norway
Quality Control
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Abstract
The present pilot study monitored for the first time volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aerosols in domestic and occupational microenvironments in the Arctic Region. Differences between the two categories of samples are noted with domestic environments exhibiting higher concentrations of VOCs (total VOCs ranging between 106 and 584 µg m(-3)), while total particulate matter was highest in workplace non-office environments (ranging between 132 and 284 µg m(-3)). The terpenes were the most abundant class of VOCs, while a variety of other compounds exhibited 100% frequency of occurrence (i.e. naphthalene, D5-volatile methyl siloxane). Compared to results from other studies/regions, the concentrations of VOCs are considered as relatively low. Based on the results and the knowledge of the typical characteristics of the Arctic lifestyle, some important sources are identified. As this is the first study that deals with indoor air quality in the coldest region globally, it is expected that it will trigger the interest of Authorities to proceed to more detailed studies.
PubMed ID
25042029 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.