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Abstinence, occasional drinking and binge drinking in middle-aged women. The Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92823
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Rundberg Jenny
Lidfeldt Jonas
Nerbrand Christina
Samsioe Göran
Romelsjö Anders
Ojehagen Agneta
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund-Psychiatry, USIL, Lund UniversityHospital, Kioskgatan 19, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. jenny.rundberg@med.lu.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Middle Aged
Motivation
Social Environment
Social Security - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although drinking patterns in women have received increased attention, few studies have focused on middle-aged women. Drinking patterns were investigated in a population sample of 513 Swedish women aged 50-59, and analysed in relation to social situation, and mental and physical health. The chi-square test was used to analyse differences in proportions. Variables showing significant differences were entered into a multivariate or multinomial logistic regression model. Abstainers and occasional drinkers had lower levels of education and more often regular medical control compared with weekly drinkers. Furthermore, abstainers more often had disability pension. Among women drinking alcohol, 56.6% affirmed binge drinking within the last year and 39.4% within the last month. Binge drinkers did not differ in terms of social situation, mental or physical health, compared with other drinkers. Drinking to relieve tension was affirmed by 7.2%. These women had more mental symptoms and less contact with friends compared with other drinkers; furthermore, they were more often binge drinkers. Binge drinking was common and health and social consequences of this drinking pattern in middle-aged women need to be further explored. Women drinking to relieve tension may need intervention for both drinking habits and mental health.
PubMed ID
18609026 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure in middle-aged women: are androgens involved? A population-based study of Swedish women: the Women's Health in the Lund Area study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84900
Source
J Hypertens. 2007 Oct;25(10):2044-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Khatibi Ali
Agardh Carl-David
Nyberg Per
Lidfeldt Jonas
Samsioe Göran
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Sweden. Ali.Khatibi_Esfanjani@med.lu.se
Source
J Hypertens. 2007 Oct;25(10):2044-50
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Androgens - blood - physiology
Androstenedione - blood - physiology
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Postmenopause - physiology
Premenopause - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Testosterone - blood - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of hypertension and use of antihypertensive drug therapy in relation to menopausal status and to delineate perceived associations between androgens and blood pressure in perimenopausal women. METHODS: A population-based sample of women aged 50-59 (n = 6893). Women were divided into three groups according to their hormonal status: premenopausal, postmenopausal without hormone therapy, and postmenopausal with hormone therapy. RESULT: In the premenopausal, postmenopausal without hormone therapy, and postmenopausal with hormone therapy groups, the prevalence of high blood pressure (>/= 140 mmHg systolic or >/= 90 mmHg diastolic) was 43.9, 49.9 and 45.8%, respectively. In women with normal blood pressure, adjusting for age, body mass index and smoking, there were negative associations between serum testosterone and systolic blood pressure in the total sample (P
PubMed ID
17885546 View in PubMed
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Cadmium-induced bone effect is not mediated via low serum 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90941
Source
Environ Res. 2009 Feb;109(2):188-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Engström Annette
Skerving Staffan
Lidfeldt Jonas
Burgaz Ann
Lundh Thomas
Samsioe Göran
Vahter Marie
Akesson Agneta
Author Affiliation
Division of Metals and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Environ Res. 2009 Feb;109(2):188-92
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Density - drug effects
Bone Diseases - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Bone and Bones - drug effects
Cadmium - toxicity - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Kidney - drug effects
Kidney Diseases - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Menopause
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Cadmium is a widespread environmental pollutant, which is associated with increased risk of osteoporosis. It has been proposed that cadmium's toxic effect on bone is exerted via impaired activation of vitamin D, secondary to the kidney effects. To test this, we assessed the association of cadmium-induced bone and kidney effects with serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D); measured by enzyme immunoassay. For the assessment, we selected 85 postmenopausal women, based on low (0.14-0.39 microg/L) or high (0.66-2.1 microg/L) urinary cadmium, within a cross-sectional population-based women's health survey in Southern Sweden. We also measured 25-hydroxy vitamin D, cadmium in blood, bone mineral density and several markers of bone remodeling and kidney effects. Although there were clear differences in both kidney and bone effect markers between women with low and high cadmium exposure, the 1,25(OH)(2)D concentrations were not significantly different (median, 111 pmol/L (5-95th percentile, 67-170 pmol/L) in low- and 125 pmol/L (66-200 pmol/L) in high-cadmium groups; p=0.08). Also, there was no association between 1,25(OH)(2)D and markers of bone or kidney effects. It is concluded that the low levels of cadmium exposure present in the studied women, although high enough to be associated with lower bone mineral density and increased bone resorption, were not associated with lower serum concentrations of 1,25(OH)(2)D. Hence, decreased circulating levels of 1,25(OH)(2)D are unlikely to be the proposed link between cadmium-induced effects on kidney and bone.
PubMed ID
19059588 View in PubMed
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Cadmium-induced effects on bone in a population-based study of women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76487
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Jun;114(6):830-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Akesson Agneta
Bjellerup Per
Lundh Thomas
Lidfeldt Jonas
Nerbrand Christina
Samsioe Göran
Skerfving Staffan
Vahter Marie
Author Affiliation
Division of Metals and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. agneta.akesson@imm.ki.se
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Jun;114(6):830-4
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
High cadmium exposure is known to cause bone damage, but the association between low-level cadmium exposure and osteoporosis remains to be clarified. Using a population-based women's health survey in southern Sweden [Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) ] with no known historical cadmium contamination, we investigated cadmium-related effects on bone in 820 women (53-64 years of age) . We measured cadmium in blood and urine and lead in blood, an array of markers of bone metabolism, and forearm bone mineral density (BMD) . Associations were evaluated in multiple linear regression analysis including information on the possible confounders or effect modifiers: weight, menopausal status, use of hormone replacement therapy, age at menarche, alcohol consumption, smoking history, and physical activity. Median urinary cadmium was 0.52 microg/L adjusted to density (0.67 microg/g creatinine) . After multivariate adjustment, BMD, parathyroid hormone, and urinary deoxypyridinoline (U-DPD) were adversely associated with concentrations of urinary cadmium (p
PubMed ID
16759980 View in PubMed
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Colorectal cancer in middle-aged women in relation to hormonal status: a report from the Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80440
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2006 Aug;22(8):416-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Nazeri Kavoos
Khatibi Ali
Nyberg Per
Agardh Carl-David
Lidfeldt Jonas
Samsioe Goran
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences in Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. kavoos.nazeri@med.lu.se
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2006 Aug;22(8):416-22
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Body mass index
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Therapy, Combination
Estradiol - blood
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause - blood - drug effects - physiology
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To delineate a perceived association of estradiol versus estradiol plus norethisterone hormone therapy on the prevalence of colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women. METHODS: The Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) project covers 10,766 women aged 50-60 years, living in the Lund area, Sweden. Out of this population, 6908 (64%) women completed questionnaires, underwent physical and laboratory assessments and had self-reported information regarding colorectal cancer. Four hundred and twenty-two (6%) were premenopausal (PM), 3600 (52%) were postmenopausal without hormone therapy (PM0), 2452 (36%) were postmenopausal with combined hormone therapy (PMT-HT) and 364 (5%) were postmenopausal with estrogen monotherapy (PMT-E). RESULTS: There were 21 cases of colorectal cancer (0.3%), one in the PM group, 16 in the PM0 group, two in the PMT-HT group and another two in the PMT-E group. Colorectal cancer prevalence was lower in the PMT-HT than in the PM0 group (odds ratio (OR) = 0.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.04-0.80). However, for the PMT-E group, the OR (95% CI) was 1.02 (0.86-1.20). There was a positive association between low physical activity (p = 0.04), low parity (p = 0.02) and risk of colorectal cancer. CONCLUSION: Combined hormone therapy seemed to be associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women in contrast to estrogen monotherapy. Hence the progestin might have a protective role.
PubMed ID
17012102 View in PubMed
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Could quality of life impact the prevalence of metabolic syndrome? Results from a population-based study of Swedish women: the Women's Health in the Lund Area Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92460
Source
Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2008;6(3):203-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Qader Saleem S
Shakir Yasameen A
Samsioe Göran
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, CRC (UMAS), University of Lund, Malmö, Sweden. Saleem.Qader@med.lu.se
Source
Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2008;6(3):203-7
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Female
Humans
Menopause
Metabolic Syndrome X - diagnosis - epidemiology
Obesity - diagnosis
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The metabolic syndrome is regarded as an important risk factor for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Metabolic syndrome could be associated with impaired quality of life (QoL). METHODS: The Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) project covers 10,766 women born between December 2, 1935, and December 1, 1945, living in the Lund area, of Sweden by December 1, 1995. The primary objectives of this project were to survey perimenopausal women in this area and to evaluate their health status and lifestyles. We used the criteria for the metabolic syndrome, as defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III), which include three or more of five risk factors: central obesity, elevated serum triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and elevated blood pressure and fasting glucose. Analysis of most aspects of daily life and QoL according to the Gothenburg Quality of Life Instrument (GQL) was done. GQL refers to the WHO definition of health. RESULTS: A total number of 6913 (64.2%) women with a mean age (56.1) years fulfilled the criteria for screening procedure in the WHILA study. A positive association between women with metabolic syndrome and the following aspects of quality of life were found: "Partnership," "free time," "memory," and being "appreciated outside home." However, "economy," "health," "body image," and "fitness" had a negative association to the metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSION: QoL is an important factor for metabolic syndrome. Apart from traditional biological factors, prevention of metabolic syndrome should also encompass QoL.
PubMed ID
18710331 View in PubMed
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Does the hormonal situation modify lipid effects by lifestyle factors in middle-aged women? Results from a population-based study of Swedish women: the women's health in the Lund area study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81449
Source
Metabolism. 2006 Aug;55(8):1060-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Shakir Yasameen A
Samsioe Göran
Nyberg Per
Lidfeldt Jonas
Nerbrand Christina
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences in Lund, Lund University, S-22185 Lund, Sweden. yasameen.shakir@med.lu.se
Source
Metabolism. 2006 Aug;55(8):1060-6
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Cholesterol - blood
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Food Habits
Health Surveys
Hormones - physiology
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Population
Postmenopause - physiology
Smoking
Sweden
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The aim of the study was to outline whether the influence by lifestyle factors on serum lipids was modified by the hormonal situation in middle-aged women. Six thousand nine hundred eight women, aged 50 to 59 years, participated in a health assessment program, including a serum lipid profile evaluation. The women were grouped according to their hormonal status into premenopausal (PM) (n = 492), postmenopausal without hormone therapy (HT) (PM0) (n = 3600), and postmenopausal with HT (PMT) (n = 2816). From the PMT group, we analyzed oral (n = 901) and transdermal HT (n = 351) regimens, containing norethisterone acetate and 17beta-estradiol. Serum lipids and lipoproteins were determined by conventional methods. Lifestyle factors included smoking and physical activity at leisure time and at work. Multivariate linear regression analysis controlling for age, education, and dietary habits showed that current smoking was positively associated with triglycerides in the PM, PM0, PMT, and oral HT groups. In the PM0, PMT, and oral HT groups, current smoking was positively associated with total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein and negatively associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Low physical activity at leisure time was positively associated with triglycerides in the PM and PMT groups and negatively associated with HDL in the PM0 and PMT groups. High physical activity at work was positively associated with triglycerides in the PMT group and with total cholesterol in the PM0 group, but negatively associated with HDL in the PMT and transdermal groups. Body mass index was positively associated with triglycerides and negatively with HDL in all the groups regardless of the hormonal situation. The serum lipid profile as influenced by lifestyle factors was modified by the hormonal situation. Compared with the postmenopausal women without HT use, the use of HT contributes to fewer "negative" effects by lifestyle factors on serum lipids.
PubMed ID
16839842 View in PubMed
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Do sex hormones influence features of the metabolic syndrome in middle-aged women? A population-based study of Swedish women: the Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77134
Source
Fertil Steril. 2007 Jul;88(1):163-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Shakir Yasameen A
Samsioe Göran
Nyberg Per
Lidfeldt Jonas
Nerbrand Christina
Agardh Carl-David
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences in Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Yasameen.Shakir@med.lu.se
Source
Fertil Steril. 2007 Jul;88(1):163-71
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To outline perceived associations between various sex hormones and risk markers for cardiovascular disease in middle-aged women, with an emphasis on features of the metabolic syndrome (MS). DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis. SETTING: Women's Health in the Lund Area Study. PATIENT(S): Population-based cohort. INTERVENTION(S): A generic questionnaire, physical examinations, and laboratory assessments were completed by 6,917 women aged 50-59 years living in the Lund area of southern Sweden. Women at or above defined cutoff limits for the MS were considered positively screened. After exclusion of women using hormone therapy (HT), 2,038 women with (MS+) and 2,054 women without features of the MS (MS-) were included. The ELISA techniques were used for the determination of serum androstendione (A), E2, T, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), cortisol, insulin, and leptin levels. Serum lipids and lipoproteins were determined by conventional methods. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed, controlling for age, body mass index (BMI), and smoking habits. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Features of the MS, sex steroids, cardiovascular risk markers. RESULT(S): In the MS+ group, a positive association was seen between A and systolic blood pressure. Estradiol was negatively associated with total cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure. The SHBG was negatively associated with triglycerides, blood glucose, and diastolic blood pressure and positively with high-density lipoprotein (HDL). In the MS- group, there were positive associations between A, blood glucose, and systolic blood pressure. Testosterone was positively associated with HDL. Estradiol was negatively associated with total cholesterol and positively with systolic blood pressure. The SHBG was positively associated with HDL and negatively with triglycerides and diastolic blood pressure. There were positive associations between cortisol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, blood glucose, and systolic blood pressure and a negative association with triglycerides in both MS+ and MS- groups. CONCLUSION(S): Androstendione, E2, and T levels were associated with cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged women. Effects by sex steroids on cardiovascular risk markers seem to be different in women with or without features of the MS.
PubMed ID
17383645 View in PubMed
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Exposure to p,p'-DDE: a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94972
Source
PLoS One. 2009;4(10):e7503
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Rignell-Hydbom Anna
Lidfeldt Jonas
Kiviranta Hannu
Rantakokko Panu
Samsioe Göran
Agardh Carl-David
Rylander Lars
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. anna.rignell-hydbom@med.lu.se
Source
PLoS One. 2009;4(10):e7503
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as PCBs, DDT and dioxins have in several cross-sectional studies shown strong associations with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Reversed causality can however not be excluded. The aim of this case-control study was to evaluate whether POPs concentration is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A case-control study was performed within a well-defined cohort of women, age 50-59 years, from the Southern part of Sweden. Biomarkers for POP exposure, 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE) were analyzed in stored serum samples, which were collected at the baseline examination when the cohort was established. For 107 out of the 371 cases, serum samples were stored at least three years before their type 2 diabetes was diagnosed. In this data set, CB-153 and p,p'-DDE were not associated with an increased risk to develop type 2 diabetes. However, when only the cases (n = 39) that were diagnosed more than six years after the baseline examination and their controls were studied, the women in the highest exposed quartile showed an increased risk to develop type 2 diabetes (OR of 1.6 [95% 0.61, 4.0] for CB-153 and 5.5 [95% CI 1.2, 25] for p,p'-DDE). CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results from the present case-control study, including a follow-up design, confirms that p,p'-DDE exposure can be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
19838294 View in PubMed
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Health hazards in middle-aged women with cardiovascular disease: a case-control study of swedish women. the women's health in the Lund area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78043
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2007 Apr;16(3):406-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Shakir Yasameen A
Samsioe Göran
Khatibi E Ali
Nyberg Per
Lidfeldt Jonas
Agardh Carl-David
Nerbrand Christina
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences in Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2007 Apr;16(3):406-14
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Female
Health status
Hormones - blood
Humans
Lipids - blood
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Postmenopause
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To delineate the health profile in middle-aged women with cardiovascular disease (CVD). METHODS: The Women's Health in the Lund Area (WHILA) project covered all women born 1935-1945 (n = 10,766) living in the Lund area; 6917 (64.2%) women completed a generic questionnaire and underwent physical and laboratory assessments. Of the 6917 women, 6416 were postmenopausal women, of whom 104 had CVD. For each woman with CVD, two controls were selected and matched for age, smoking habits, body mass index (BMI), waist/hip ratio (WHR), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density liproprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), diastolic blood pressure and hormonal status. RESULTS: One hundred four women (1.6%) reported CVD. Forty-nine had a myocardial infarction (MI), 49 had a stroke, and 6 women had both events; 71.4% were postmenopausal, with never use of hormone therapy (HT) (PM0), and 28.6% were postmenopausal with ever use of HT (PMT). Compared with the control group, serum androstendione was lower (p = 0.004) in the case group, and menopausal estradiol (E(2)) values were less frequent (p = 0.037) in cases from the PM0 group. Among psychological and somatic symptoms, nervousness (p
PubMed ID
17439385 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.