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Associations between serum polybrominated diphenyl ethers and thyroid hormones in a cross sectional study of a remote Alaska Native population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289441
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 Feb 02; 8(1):2198
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-02-2018
Author
Samuel C Byrne
Pamela Miller
Samarys Seguinot-Medina
Vi Waghiyi
C Loren Buck
Frank A von Hippel
David O Carpenter
Author Affiliation
Environmental Studies, St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY, USA. sbyrne@stlawu.edu.
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 Feb 02; 8(1):2198
Date
Feb-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. Arctic indigenous peoples are exposed to PBDEs through a traditional diet high in marine mammals. PBDEs disrupt thyroid homeostasis. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between serum PBDEs and thyroid function in a remote population of St. Lawrence Island Yupik. Serum samples were collected from 85 individuals from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska and measured for concentrations of PBDEs, free and total thyroxine (T4), free and total triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The relationships between PBDEs and thyroid hormones were assessed using multiple linear regression fit with generalized estimating equations. Serum concentrations of several Penta-BDE congeners (BDE-28/33, 47, and 100) were positively associated with concentrations of TSH and free T3, while serum concentration of BDE-153 was negatively associated with total T3 concentrations. Both BDE-47 and 153 remained significantly associated with thyroid hormones when BDE-47, BDE-153, and BDE-209 were covariates in the same model. There were no significant relationships between serum concentrations of PBDEs and either free or total T4. Individual PBDEs are associated with thyroid hormones in serum from a remote population of Alaska Natives, and directions of effect differ by congener.
Notes
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Cites: Toxicology. 2002 Aug 15;177(2-3):227-43 PMID 12135626
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Cites: Environ Res. 2016 Aug;149:222-230 PMID 27228485
PubMed ID
29396447 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between serum polybrominated diphenyl ethers and thyroid hormones in a cross sectional study of a remote Alaska Native population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289599
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 Feb 02; 8(1):2198
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-02-2018
Author
Samuel C Byrne
Pamela Miller
Samarys Seguinot-Medina
Vi Waghiyi
C Loren Buck
Frank A von Hippel
David O Carpenter
Author Affiliation
Environmental Studies, St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY, USA. sbyrne@stlawu.edu.
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 Feb 02; 8(1):2198
Date
Feb-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. Arctic indigenous peoples are exposed to PBDEs through a traditional diet high in marine mammals. PBDEs disrupt thyroid homeostasis. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between serum PBDEs and thyroid function in a remote population of St. Lawrence Island Yupik. Serum samples were collected from 85 individuals from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska and measured for concentrations of PBDEs, free and total thyroxine (T4), free and total triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The relationships between PBDEs and thyroid hormones were assessed using multiple linear regression fit with generalized estimating equations. Serum concentrations of several Penta-BDE congeners (BDE-28/33, 47, and 100) were positively associated with concentrations of TSH and free T3, while serum concentration of BDE-153 was negatively associated with total T3 concentrations. Both BDE-47 and 153 remained significantly associated with thyroid hormones when BDE-47, BDE-153, and BDE-209 were covariates in the same model. There were no significant relationships between serum concentrations of PBDEs and either free or total T4. Individual PBDEs are associated with thyroid hormones in serum from a remote population of Alaska Natives, and directions of effect differ by congener.
Notes
Cites: Biometrics. 1986 Mar;42(1):121-30 PMID 3719049
Cites: Toxicology. 2002 Aug 15;177(2-3):227-43 PMID 12135626
Cites: Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 1989 Jul-Aug;18(4):495-500 PMID 2505694
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2015 Feb 3;49(3):1521-8 PMID 25548829
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2009 Jan;107(1):27-39 PMID 18978342
Cites: J Clin Res Pediatr Endocrinol. 2013;5 Suppl 1:40-4 PMID 23149391
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Oct;117(10):1520-5 PMID 20019900
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Jun;116(6):806-13 PMID 18560538
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2011 Mar;214(2):115-20 PMID 21106438
Cites: Curr Opin Pharmacol. 2014 Dec;19:125-33 PMID 25306433
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Apr 17;46(8):4633-40 PMID 22482873
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Mar;118(3):357-62 PMID 20064778
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Nov;113(11):1549-54 PMID 16263510
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Oct 15;47(20):11776-84 PMID 24066858
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2000 Jul;56(1):95-104 PMID 10869457
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Dec;116(12):1635-41 PMID 19079713
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Sep;117(9):1380-6 PMID 19750101
Cites: Environ Health. 2016 May 24;15(1):60 PMID 27215290
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Dec 4;46(23):12943-51 PMID 23110413
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2005 Jan;152(1):1-9 PMID 15762182
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Feb;117(2):197-202 PMID 19270788
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2010 Jul 1;408(15):2885-918 PMID 19815253
Cites: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2008 Feb;52(2):284-98 PMID 18161906
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Feb 28;160(4):526-34 PMID 10695693
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Jul;89(7):3365-70 PMID 15240616
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Sep 15;45(18):7896-905 PMID 21830753
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2011;74(18):1195-214 PMID 21797772
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Aug;95(8):3614-7 PMID 20685890
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Jul 15;45(14):6129-35 PMID 21699185
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2004 Feb 15;38(4):945-56 PMID 14998004
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 May;118(5):699-704 PMID 20103495
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2017 Dec;231(Pt 1):387-395 PMID 28818814
Cites: J Thyroid Res. 2011;2011:875125 PMID 21687614
Cites: Environ Toxicol Pharmacol. 2008 May;25(3):386-92 PMID 21783878
Cites: Chem Res Toxicol. 2015 Jun 15;28(6):1265-74 PMID 26004626
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Mar;92(3):841-5 PMID 17200168
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2008 Aug 15;401(1-3):60-72 PMID 18538377
Cites: Environ Int. 2012 Apr;40:102-9 PMID 21802148
Cites: Toxicol Lett. 2012 Mar 7;209(2):193-201 PMID 22233939
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Apr;40(4):325-35 PMID 1556359
Cites: Anal Bioanal Chem. 2006 Oct;386(4):807-17 PMID 17165211
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Feb 15;163(4):374-83 PMID 16394206
Cites: Epidemiology. 1990 Jan;1(1):43-6 PMID 2081237
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2005 Dec 1;39(23):9057-63 PMID 16382925
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2001 May;61(1):76-82 PMID 11294977
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2012 May;127(1):76-83 PMID 22345314
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 May 18;10(5):e0126989 PMID 25992849
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Jul;113(7):853-7 PMID 16002372
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;56(2):138-43 PMID 11339677
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2008 Feb 15;42(4):1377-84 PMID 18351120
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2014 Apr-May;217(4-5):473-82 PMID 24138783
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2015 Oct;123(10):1079-85 PMID 25893858
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Nov 28;165(21):2460-6 PMID 16314541
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2008 Mar 15;42(6):2195-200 PMID 18411489
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2016 Apr;124(4):420-5 PMID 26372669
Cites: Environ Health. 2016 Apr 26;15:55 PMID 27114094
Cites: Thyroid. 2012 Dec;22(12):1200-35 PMID 22954017
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Feb;114(2):176-81 PMID 16451851
Cites: Epidemiology. 1999 Jan;10(1):37-48 PMID 9888278
Cites: Arch Toxicol. 2001 Jun;75(4):200-8 PMID 11482517
Cites: Environ Res. 2016 Aug;149:222-230 PMID 27228485
PubMed ID
29396447 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between serum polybrominated diphenyl ethers and thyroid hormones in a cross sectional study of a remote Alaska Native population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296904
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 02 02; 8(1):2198
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
02-02-2018
Author
Samuel C Byrne
Pamela Miller
Samarys Seguinot-Medina
Vi Waghiyi
C Loren Buck
Frank A von Hippel
David O Carpenter
Author Affiliation
Environmental Studies, St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY, USA. sbyrne@stlawu.edu.
Source
Sci Rep. 2018 02 02; 8(1):2198
Date
02-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Correlation of Data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - blood
Humans
Male
Serum - chemistry
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. Arctic indigenous peoples are exposed to PBDEs through a traditional diet high in marine mammals. PBDEs disrupt thyroid homeostasis. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between serum PBDEs and thyroid function in a remote population of St. Lawrence Island Yupik. Serum samples were collected from 85 individuals from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska and measured for concentrations of PBDEs, free and total thyroxine (T4), free and total triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The relationships between PBDEs and thyroid hormones were assessed using multiple linear regression fit with generalized estimating equations. Serum concentrations of several Penta-BDE congeners (BDE-28/33, 47, and 100) were positively associated with concentrations of TSH and free T3, while serum concentration of BDE-153 was negatively associated with total T3 concentrations. Both BDE-47 and 153 remained significantly associated with thyroid hormones when BDE-47, BDE-153, and BDE-209 were covariates in the same model. There were no significant relationships between serum concentrations of PBDEs and either free or total T4. Individual PBDEs are associated with thyroid hormones in serum from a remote population of Alaska Natives, and directions of effect differ by congener.
PubMed ID
29396447 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community-based participatory research projects and policy engagement to protect environmental health on St Lawrence Island, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107789
Source
Pages 967-977 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):967-977
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Pamela K Miller
Viola Waghiyi
Gretchen Welfinger-Smith
Samuel Carter Byrne
Jane Kava
Jesse Gologergen
Lorraine Eckstein
Ronald Scrudato
Jeff Chiarenzelli
David O Carpenter
Samarys Seguinot-Medina
Author Affiliation
Alaska Community Action on Toxics, Anchorage, AK 99503, USA. pamela@akaction.org
Source
Pages 967-977 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):967-977
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods - organization & administration
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental Health - methods - organization & administration
Fishes
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Health Policy
Humans
Islands - epidemiology
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Abstract
This article synthesizes discussion of collaborative research results, interventions and policy engagement for St Lawrence Island (SLI), Alaska, during the years 2000-2012.
As part of on-going community-based participatory research (CBPR) studies on SLI, 5 discrete exposure-assessment projects were conducted: (a) a biomonitoring study of human blood serum; (b-d) 3 investigations of levels of contaminants in environmental media at an abandoned military site at Northeast Cape--using sediment cores and plants, semi-permeable membrane devices and blackfish, respectively; and (e) a study of traditional foods.
Blood serum in residents of SLI showed elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with higher levels among those exposed to the military site at Northeast Cape, an important traditional subsistence-use area. Environmental studies at the military site demonstrated that the site is a continuing source of PCBs to a major watershed, and that clean-up operations at the military site generated PCB-contaminated dust on plants in the region. Important traditional foods eaten by the people of SLI showed elevated concentrations of PCBs, which are primarily derived from the long-range transport of persistent pollutants that are transported by atmospheric and marine currents from more southerly latitudes to the north.
An important task for all CBPR projects is to conduct intervention strategies as needed in response to research results. Because of the findings of the CBPR projects on SLI, the CBPR team and the people of the Island are actively engaging in interventions to ensure cleanup of the formerly used military sites; reform chemicals policy on a national level; and eliminate persistent pollutants internationally. The goal is to make the Island and other northern/Arctic communities safe for themselves and future generations.
As part of the CBPR projects conducted from 2000 to 2012, a series of exposure assessments demonstrate that the leaders of SLI have reason to be concerned about the health of people due to the presence of carcinogenic chemicals as measured in biomonitoring and environmental samples and important traditional foods.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23977641 View in PubMed
Documents
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Environmental health and justice and the right to research: institutional review board denials of community-based chemical biomonitoring of breast milk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275575
Source
Environ Health. 2015;14:90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Dvera I Saxton
Phil Brown
Samarys Seguinot-Medina
Lorraine Eckstein
David O Carpenter
Pamela Miller
Vi Waghiyi
Source
Environ Health. 2015;14:90
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Community-Based Participatory Research - ethics
Environmental Health - ethics
Environmental Monitoring - ethics
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Ethics Committees, Research - ethics
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Milk, human - chemistry
Pilot Projects
Social Justice - ethics
Abstract
Recently, conflicts and challenges have emerged regarding environmental justice and research ethics for some indigenous communities. Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT) responded to community requests for breast milk biomonitoring and conceived the Breast Milk Pilot Study (BMPS). Despite having community support and federal and private funding, the BMPS remains incomplete due to repeated disapprovals by the Alaska Area IRB (Institutional Review Board). In this commentary, we explore the consequences of years of IRB denials, in terms of health inequalities, environmental justice, and research ethics. We highlight the greater significance of this story with respect to research in Alaska Native communities, biomonitoring, and global toxics regulation. We offer suggestions to community-based researchers conducting biomonitoring projects on how to engage with IRBs in order to cultivate reflective, context-based research ethics that better consider the needs and concerns of communities.
Notes
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Erratum In: Environ Health. 2016;15(1):8227473124
PubMed ID
26606980 View in PubMed
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Exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances and associations with serum thyroid hormones in a remote population of Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292537
Source
Environ Res. 2018 Jun 26; 166:537-543
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-26-2018
Author
Samuel C Byrne
Pamela Miller
Samarys Seguinot-Medina
Vi Waghiyi
C Loren Buck
Frank A von Hippel
David O Carpenter
Author Affiliation
Environmental Studies, St. Lawrence University, 23 Romoda Drive, Canton, NY, USA. Electronic address: sbyrne@stlawu.edu.
Source
Environ Res. 2018 Jun 26; 166:537-543
Date
Jun-26-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are known to accumulate in traditional food animals of the Arctic, and arctic indigenous peoples may be exposed via consumption of subsistence-harvested animals. PFASs are suspected of disrupting thyroid hormone homeostasis in humans. The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between serum PFASs and thyroid function in a remote population of Alaska Natives. Serum samples were collected from 85 individuals from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. The concentrations of 13 PFASs, as well as free and total thyroxine (T4), free and total triiodothyronine (T3), and thyrotropin (TSH) were quantified in serum samples. The relationships between circulating concentrations of PFASs and thyroid hormones were assessed using multiple linear regression fit with generalized estimating equations. Several PFASs, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), were positively associated with TSH concentrations when modeled individually. PFOS and PFNA were significantly associated with free T3 and PFNA was significantly associated with total T3 in models with PFAS*sex interactive terms; these associations suggested negative associations in men and positive associations in women. PFASs were not significantly associated with concentrations of free or total T4. Serum PFASs are associated with circulating thyroid hormone concentrations in a remote population of Alaska Natives. The effects of PFAS exposure on thyroid hormone homeostasis may differ between sexes.
PubMed ID
29958161 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances and associations with serum thyroid hormones in a remote population of Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303188
Source
Environ Res. 2018 10; 166:537-543
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
10-2018
Author
Samuel C Byrne
Pamela Miller
Samarys Seguinot-Medina
Vi Waghiyi
C Loren Buck
Frank A von Hippel
David O Carpenter
Author Affiliation
Environmental Studies, St. Lawrence University, 23 Romoda Drive, Canton, NY, USA. Electronic address: sbyrne@stlawu.edu.
Source
Environ Res. 2018 10; 166:537-543
Date
10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Alkanesulfonic Acids - analysis
Animals
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Female
Fluorocarbons - analysis
Humans
Islands
Male
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Abstract
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are known to accumulate in traditional food animals of the Arctic, and arctic indigenous peoples may be exposed via consumption of subsistence-harvested animals. PFASs are suspected of disrupting thyroid hormone homeostasis in humans. The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between serum PFASs and thyroid function in a remote population of Alaska Natives. Serum samples were collected from 85 individuals from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. The concentrations of 13 PFASs, as well as free and total thyroxine (T4), free and total triiodothyronine (T3), and thyrotropin (TSH) were quantified in serum samples. The relationships between circulating concentrations of PFASs and thyroid hormones were assessed using multiple linear regression fit with generalized estimating equations. Several PFASs, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), were positively associated with TSH concentrations when modeled individually. PFOS and PFNA were significantly associated with free T3 and PFNA was significantly associated with total T3 in models with PFAS*sex interactive terms; these associations suggested negative associations in men and positive associations in women. PFASs were not significantly associated with concentrations of free or total T4. Serum PFASs are associated with circulating thyroid hormone concentrations in a remote population of Alaska Natives. The effects of PFAS exposure on thyroid hormone homeostasis may differ between sexes.
PubMed ID
29958161 View in PubMed
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Exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and perfluoroalkyl substances in a remote population of Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289912
Source
Environ Pollut. 2017 Dec; 231(Pt 1):387-395
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Samuel Byrne
Samarys Seguinot-Medina
Pamela Miller
Vi Waghiyi
Frank A von Hippel
C Loren Buck
David O Carpenter
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Studies, 104 Memorial Hall, St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY 13617, USA. Electronic address: sbyrne@stlawu.edu.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2017 Dec; 231(Pt 1):387-395
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Animals
Diet
Dust - analysis
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Fatty Acids - blood
Fluorocarbons - blood
Food
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis - blood
Humans
Islands
Smegmamorpha - metabolism
Abstract
Many Alaska Native communities rely on a traditional marine diet that contains persistent organic pollutants (POPs). The indoor environment is also a source of POPs. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are present both in the traditional diet and the home indoor environment.
We assessed exposure to PBDEs and PFASs among residents of two remote Alaska Native villages on St. Lawrence Island. Ninespine stickleback (Pungitious pungitious) and Alaska blackfish (Dallia pectoralis) were used to detect accumulation of these compounds in the local environment.
Concentrations of PBDEs and PFASs were measured in dust collected from 49 households on St. Lawrence Island, as well as in blood serum from 85 island residents. Resident ninespine stickleback and Alaska blackfish were used as sentinels to detect accumulation of PBDEs and PFASs in the food web.
Serum concentrations of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) were elevated, despite low concentrations of PFASs in dust samples. Concentrations of PBDEs in dust and serum were similar to those from the contiguous United States. Statistical associations between dust and serum concentrations are apparent for a small number of PBDEs, suggesting a possible route of exposure. Predominant compounds were similar between human sera and stickleback; however, blackfish accumulated PFASs not found in either stickleback or human sera.
Household dust contributes to PBDE exposure, but not PFAS exposure. Elevated concentrations of long chain PFASs in serum are likely due to exposure from traditional foods. The presence of both PFASs and PBDEs in sentinel fish species suggests atmospheric deposition and bioaccumulation, as well as local environmental contamination.
PubMed ID
28818814 View in PubMed
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Exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and perfluoroalkyl substances in a remote population of Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285011
Source
Environ Pollut. 2017 Aug 14;231(Pt 1):387-395
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-14-2017
Author
Samuel Byrne
Samarys Seguinot-Medina
Pamela Miller
Vi Waghiyi
Frank A von Hippel
C Loren Buck
David O Carpenter
Source
Environ Pollut. 2017 Aug 14;231(Pt 1):387-395
Date
Aug-14-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Many Alaska Native communities rely on a traditional marine diet that contains persistent organic pollutants (POPs). The indoor environment is also a source of POPs. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are present both in the traditional diet and the home indoor environment.
We assessed exposure to PBDEs and PFASs among residents of two remote Alaska Native villages on St. Lawrence Island. Ninespine stickleback (Pungitious pungitious) and Alaska blackfish (Dallia pectoralis) were used to detect accumulation of these compounds in the local environment.
Concentrations of PBDEs and PFASs were measured in dust collected from 49 households on St. Lawrence Island, as well as in blood serum from 85 island residents. Resident ninespine stickleback and Alaska blackfish were used as sentinels to detect accumulation of PBDEs and PFASs in the food web.
Serum concentrations of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) were elevated, despite low concentrations of PFASs in dust samples. Concentrations of PBDEs in dust and serum were similar to those from the contiguous United States. Statistical associations between dust and serum concentrations are apparent for a small number of PBDEs, suggesting a possible route of exposure. Predominant compounds were similar between human sera and stickleback; however, blackfish accumulated PFASs not found in either stickleback or human sera.
Household dust contributes to PBDE exposure, but not PFAS exposure. Elevated concentrations of long chain PFASs in serum are likely due to exposure from traditional foods. The presence of both PFASs and PBDEs in sentinel fish species suggests atmospheric deposition and bioaccumulation, as well as local environmental contamination.
PubMed ID
28818814 View in PubMed
Less detail

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