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Differences among families in craniofacial shape at early life-stages of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304365
Source
BMC Dev Biol. 2020 10 26; 20(1):21
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-26-2020
Author
Samantha V Beck
Katja Räsänen
Camille A Leblanc
Skúli Skúlason
Zophonías O Jónsson
Bjarni K Kristjánsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Aquaculture and Fish Biology, Hólar University, 551, Sauðárkrókur, Iceland. beck@holar.is.
Source
BMC Dev Biol. 2020 10 26; 20(1):21
Date
10-26-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Organismal fitness can be determined at early life-stages, but phenotypic variation at early life-stages is rarely considered in studies on evolutionary diversification. The trophic apparatus has been shown to contribute to sympatric resource-mediated divergence in several taxa. However, processes underlying diversification in trophic traits are poorly understood. Using phenotypically variable Icelandic Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus), we reared offspring from multiple families under standardized laboratory conditions and tested to what extent family (i.e. direct genetic and maternal effects) contributes to offspring morphology at hatching (H) and first feeding (FF). To understand the underlying mechanisms behind early life-stage variation in morphology, we examined how craniofacial shape varied according to family, offspring size, egg size and candidate gene expression.
Craniofacial shape (i.e. the Meckel's cartilage and hyoid arch) was more variable between families than within families both across and within developmental stages. Differences in craniofacial morphology between developmental stages correlated with offspring size, whilst within developmental stages only shape at FF correlated with offspring size, as well as female mean egg size. Larger offspring and offspring from females with larger eggs consistently had a wider hyoid arch and contracted Meckel's cartilage in comparison to smaller offspring.
This study provides evidence for family-level variation in early life-stage trophic morphology, indicating the potential for parental effects to facilitate resource polymorphism.
PubMed ID
33106153 View in PubMed
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Gene expression in the phenotypically plastic Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus): A focus on growth and ossification at early stages of development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296155
Source
Evol Dev. 2018 Nov 26; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-26-2018
Author
Samantha V Beck
Katja Räsänen
Ehsan P Ahi
Bjarni K Kristjánsson
Skúli Skúlason
Zophonías O Jónsson
Camille A Leblanc
Author Affiliation
Department of Aquaculture and Fish Biology, Hólar University College, Háskólinn á Hólum, Sauðárkrókur, Iceland.
Source
Evol Dev. 2018 Nov 26; :
Date
Nov-26-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Gene expression during development shapes the phenotypes of individuals. Although embryonic gene expression can have lasting effects on developmental trajectories, few studies consider the role of maternal effects, such as egg size, on gene expression. Using qPCR, we characterize relative expression of 14 growth and/or skeletal promoting genes across embryonic development in Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). We test to what extent their relative expression is correlated with egg size and size at early life-stages within the study population. We predict smaller individuals to have higher expression of growth and skeletal promoting genes, due to less maternal resources (i.e., yolk) and prioritization of energy toward ossification. We found expression levels to vary across developmental stages and only three genes (Mmp9, Star, and Sgk1) correlated with individual size at a given developmental stage. Contrary to our hypothesis, expression of Mmp9 and Star showed a non-linear relationship with size (at post fertilization and hatching, respectively), whilst Sgk1 was higher in larger embryos at hatching. Interestingly, these genes are also associated with craniofacial divergence of Arctic charr morphs. Our results indicate that early life-stage variation in gene expression, concomitant to maternal effects, can influence developmental plasticity and potentially the evolution of resource polymorphism in fishes.
PubMed ID
30474913 View in PubMed
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