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Source
Bull Cancer. 1985;72(1):48-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
S. Schraub
Source
Bull Cancer. 1985;72(1):48-51
Date
1985
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Connecticut
Cross-Sectional Studies
English Abstract
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - mortality - psychology
Norway
Registries
Risk
Suicide - epidemiology - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
The risk of suicide seems to be higher among cancer patients than in the general public. The four large studies available on this subject concern either the prevalence of cancer among death by suicide or the rate of death by suicide among cancer patients collected by a population cancer registry compared to the rate of suicide in the general population. In these studies an increased risk of suicide has been noted especially among men over 60 with advanced tumors and in whom the diagnosis of cancer has been made recently.
PubMed ID
3872692 View in PubMed
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Childhood leukaemia in Europe after Chernobyl: 5 year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22704
Source
Br J Cancer. 1996 Apr;73(8):1006-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
D M Parkin
D. Clayton
R J Black
E. Masuyer
H P Friedl
E. Ivanov
J. Sinnaeve
C G Tzvetansky
E. Geryk
H H Storm
M. Rahu
E. Pukkala
J L Bernard
P M Carli
M C L'Huilluier
F. Ménégoz
P. Schaffer
S. Schraub
P. Kaatsch
J. Michaelis
E. Apjok
D. Schuler
P. Crosignani
C. Magnani
B G Bennett
Author Affiliation
Unit of Descriptive Epidemiology, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1996 Apr;73(8):1006-12
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Child
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Male
Power Plants
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Abstract
The European Childhood Leukaemia - Lymphoma Incidence Study (ECLIS) is designed to address concerns about a possible increase in the risk of cancer in Europe following the nuclear accident in Chernobyle in 1986. This paper reports results of surveillance of childhood leukaemia in cancer registry populations from 1980 up to the end of 1991. There was a slight increase in the incidence of childhood leukaemia in Europe during this period, but the overall geographical pattern of change bears no relation to estimated exposure to radiation resulting from the accident. We conclude that at this stage of follow-up any changes in incidence consequent upon the Chernobyl accident remain undetectable against the usual background rates. Our results are consistent with current estimates of the leukaemogenic risk of radiation exposure, which, outside the immediate vicinity of the accident, was small.
PubMed ID
8611419 View in PubMed
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A comprehensive assessment of satisfaction with care: preliminary psychometric analysis in French, Polish, Swedish and Italian oncology patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19772
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2001 Jun;43(3):243-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
A. Brédart
D. Razavi
C. Robertson
L. Batel-Copel
G. Larsson
D. Lichosik
J. Meyza
S. Schraub
L. von Essen
J C de Haes
Author Affiliation
Psycho-Oncology Research Unit, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. anne.bredart@curie.net
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2001 Jun;43(3):243-52
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Patient satisfaction
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Translating
Abstract
Satisfaction with care may be closely related to quality of life in cancer patients. This evaluation is especially relevant when quality of care is considered. The present study assessed whether equivalent scaling properties could be found in a comprehensive assessment of satisfaction with care (CASC) administered in cancer patients from French, Polish and Swedish oncology settings, in comparison to the scaling properties previously evidenced in the CASC with an Italian sample. A total of 140, 186 and 133 oncology patients were approached in France, Poland and Sweden, respectively. Specific items in the CASC were identified as consistently omitted across country samples. Multitrait scaling analysis on an item-grouping adapted for the French, Polish, Swedish and Italian samples provided excellent internal consistencies and convergent validity estimates. Discriminant validity proved less satisfactory, evidencing overlap between hypothesised care dimensions across country samples. The identification of omitted or overlapping items will lead to the design of a revised CASC version to further test in larger cross-cultural samples.
PubMed ID
11384822 View in PubMed
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Patients' satisfaction ratings and their desire for care improvement across oncology settings from France, Italy, Poland and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18664
Source
Psychooncology. 2003 Jan-Feb;12(1):68-77
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Brédart
C. Robertson
D. Razavi
L. Batel-Copel
G. Larsson
D. Lichosik
J. Meyza
S. Schraub
L. von Essen
J C J M de Haes
Author Affiliation
Psycho-Oncology Research Unit, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. anne.bredart@curie.net
Source
Psychooncology. 2003 Jan-Feb;12(1):68-77
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cultural Characteristics
Education
Female
France
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Italy
Male
Medical Oncology - standards
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Patient satisfaction
Poland
Quality of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
There has been an increasing interest in patient satisfaction assessment across nations recently. This paper reports on a cross-cultural comparison of the comprehensive assessment of satisfaction with care (CASC) response scales. We investigated what proportion of patients wanted care improvement for the same level of satisfaction across samples from oncology settings in France, Italy, Poland and Sweden, and whether age, gender, education level and type of items affected the relationships found.The CASC addresses patient's satisfaction with the care received in oncology hospitals. Patients are invited to rate aspects of care and to mention for each of these aspects, whether they would want improvement.One hundred and forty, 395, 186 and 133 consecutive patients were approached in oncology settings from France, Italy, Poland and Sweden, respectively.Across country settings, an increasing percentage of patients wanted care improvement for decreasing levels of satisfaction. However, in France a higher percentage of patients wanted care improvement for high-satisfaction ratings whereas in Poland a lower percentage of patients wanted care improvement for low-satisfaction ratings. Age and education level had a similar effect across countries.Confronting levels of satisfaction with desire for care improvement appeared useful in comprehending the meaning of response choice labels for the CASC across oncology settings from different linguistic and cultural background. Linguistic or socio-cultural differences were suggested for explaining discrepancies between countries.
PubMed ID
12548649 View in PubMed
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Unproven methods in cancer: a worldwide problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20623
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2000 Jan;8(1):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
S. Schraub
Author Affiliation
Centre Régional de Lutte Contre le Cancer, Comprehensive Cancer Center Paul Strauss, Strasbourg, France. Schraub@strasbourg.fnclcc.fr
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2000 Jan;8(1):10-5
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies
Humans
Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Abstract
Questionable or unproven methods are used by cancer patients throughout the world. Treatments include drugs, vitamins, herbs, diets, healing, "psychological" treatments, folk medicines, and homeopathy. The exact frequency of questionable methods in cancer is difficult to evaluate because of the variety of methods, some being used as complementary treatments to conventional ones (and often not mentioned by patients) and others, as curative treatment (alternative treatment). In Europe, data are available for the Nordic countries, Switzerland, Germany, Austria, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, France and Italy. High frequencies of use are observed in German-speaking countries (52-65%). In North America, many publications give frequencies of between 7% and 54%. In Mexico, the frequency is 50%, higher than in Argentina (17%). In Australia, 22% have used complementary medicines. In Asia, some data are available from India, Taiwan and Japan. In Tunisia (northern Africa), the results of 59 interviews also show the use of questionable methods among Arabic patients. There is a lack of data from countries in Africa and in Asia. While some products are used all over the world (e.g. mistletoe, vitamins), others are country specific (Moerman diet in The Netherlands). Some traditional medicines are also country specific (e.g., Chinese medicine, Ayurvedic medicine in India). Both alternative and complementary unproven methods are prescribed either according to classical concepts of cancer treatment or according to a new concept of the world and of life.
PubMed ID
10650891 View in PubMed
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