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16 records – page 1 of 2.

15 years after Chernobyl: new evidence of thyroid cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19395
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-2001
Author
Y. Shibata
S. Yamashita
V B Masyakin
G D Panasyuk
S. Nagataki
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Date
Dec-8-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Population Surveillance
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident happened on April 26, 1986. We investigated the cause of the striking increase in frequency of thyroid cancer in children who lived within a 150 km radius of Chernobyl and who were born before and after the accident. No thyroid cancer was seen in 9472 children born in 1987-89, whereas one and 31 thyroid cancers were recorded in 2409 children born April 27, 1986, to Dec 31, 1986, and 9720 born Jan 1, 1983, to April 26, 1986, respectively. Short-lived radioactive fallout caused by the Chernobyl accident probably induced thyroid cancer in children living near Chernobyl.
PubMed ID
11747925 View in PubMed
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137Cs concentration among children in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident: Mogilev and Gomel oblasts, Belarus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35663
Source
Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
M. Hoshi
Y. Shibata
S. Okajima
T. Takatsuji
S. Yamashita
H. Namba
N. Yokoyama
M. Izumi
S. Nagataki
K. Fujimura
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine and Biology, Hiroshima University, Japan.
Source
Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-5
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
The level of radiation exposure in children in Belarus caused by the Chernobyl accident was investigated on the basis of whole body 137Cs count. The subjects were 10,062 children (4,762 boys and 5,300 girls) in Mogilev and Gomel, Belarus, who received Chernobyl Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project health examinations from May 1991 to December 1992 and who were 5-16 y old at the time of examination. The median whole body 137Cs count per body weight varied from 21-48 Bq kg-1 and from 28-126 Bq kg-1 in Mogilev oblast and Gomel oblast, respectively. (The "oblast" is the largest administrative district constituting the country. Belarus consists of 6 oblasts). Corresponding annual effective dose equivalents were all less than the public dose limit of 1 mSv y-1, but the observed levels in the children were considerably higher than the average level of 2.3 Bq kg-1 reported in the past for the former Soviet Union.
Notes
Comment In: Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-57730075
PubMed ID
8056594 View in PubMed
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[Chernobyl accident and occurrence of thyroid neoplasms]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22002
Source
Nippon Naika Gakkai Zasshi. 1997 Jul 10;86(7):1215-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-10-1997
Author
S. Nagataki
K. Ashizawa
Source
Nippon Naika Gakkai Zasshi. 1997 Jul 10;86(7):1215-21
Date
Jul-10-1997
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Child
Humans
Power Plants
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
PubMed ID
9379102 View in PubMed
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Childhood thyroid cancer: comparison of Japan and Belarus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21501
Source
Endocr J. 1998 Apr;45(2):203-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
Y. Shirahige
M. Ito
K. Ashizawa
T. Motomura
N. Yokoyama
H. Namba
S. Fukata
T. Yokozawa
N. Ishikawa
T. Mimura
S. Yamashita
I. Sekine
K. Kuma
K. Ito
S. Nagataki
Author Affiliation
First Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Japan.
Source
Endocr J. 1998 Apr;45(2):203-9
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adenocarcinoma, Follicular - epidemiology
Adolescent
Age Factors
Byelarus - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Papillary - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Staging
Power Plants
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Thyroidectomy
Ukraine
Abstract
The high incidence of childhood thyroid cancer in Belarus is suspected to be due to radiation exposure after the Chernobyl reactor accident. To clarify the clinical and histological characteristics of childhood thyroid cancer in Belarus, we therefore compared these patients to a radiation non-exposed control series in Japan. In Belarus, 26 thyroid cancers in subjects aged 15 or younger were diagnosed among 25,000 screened between 1991 and 1995 by Chernobyl-Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project. The clinical and morphologic features of these 26 cases were compared to 37 childhood thyroid cancers in Japan diagnosed between 1962 and 1995. The age distribution at operation in Belarus showed a peak at 10 years old, with a subsequent fall in numbers. In contrast, the age distribution at operation in Japan showed a smooth increase between the ages of 8 and 14. The mean tumor diameter was smaller in Belarus than that in Japan (1.4 +/- 0.7 vs. 4.1 +/- 1.7 cm, P
PubMed ID
9700473 View in PubMed
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Childhood thyroid diseases around Chernobyl evaluated by ultrasound examination and fine needle aspiration cytology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23054
Source
Thyroid. 1995 Oct;5(5):365-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
M. Ito
S. Yamashita
K. Ashizawa
H. Namba
M. Hoshi
Y. Shibata
I. Sekine
S. Nagataki
I. Shigematsu
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Japan.
Source
Thyroid. 1995 Oct;5(5):365-8
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adenocarcinoma, Follicular - pathology - ultrasonography
Adolescent
Adult
Biopsy, Needle
Byelarus
Carcinoma, Papillary - pathology - ultrasonography
Child
Chronic Disease
Female
Goiter - pathology - ultrasonography
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Russia
Thyroid Diseases - etiology - pathology - ultrasonography
Thyroid Neoplasms - etiology - pathology - ultrasonography
Thyroiditis - pathology - ultrasonography
Ukraine
Abstract
Screening by ultrasound examination and fine-needle aspiration cytological biopsy (FNA) was conducted in five regions in Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia to investigate the prevalence of childhood thyroid diseases around Chernobyl. Gomel, Zhitomir, Kiev, and the western area of Bryansk are the administrative regions where severe radioactive contamination occurred. The subjects from Mogilev, where contamination was relatively low, served as controls. Among 55,054 subjects (26,406 boys and 28,648 girls), the prevalence of ultrasonographic thyroid abnormalities such as nodule, cyst, and abnormal echogenity was significantly higher in the regions with severe contamination than in Mogilev. Of the 1,396 children showing echographic thyroid abnormalities 197 were selected for FNA, and a sample was successfully obtained for diagnosis from 171 (51 boys and 120 girls) of the 197 subjects. The aspirate was insufficient for diagnosis in the remaining 26 subjects. Thyroid cancer was encountered in four children (2.3%) from the contaminated regions, two children being from Gomel. The other thyroid diseases were follicular neoplasm, 6.4%; adenomatous goiter, 18.7%; chronic thyroiditis, 31.0%; and cyst, 24.0%, suggesting that a major cause of thyroid nodularity is nonneoplastic changes, mainly chronic thyroiditis and cysts. These results will serve as an important data base for further analyses and suggest that childhood thyroid diseases, including both neoplasms and immunological disorders, are consequences of radioactive fallout.
PubMed ID
8563473 View in PubMed
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The Cohen syndrome: does mottled retina separate a Finnish and a Jewish type?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228457
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1990 Sep;37(1):109-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1990
Author
I. Kondo
S. Nagataki
N. Miyagi
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan.
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1990 Sep;37(1):109-13
Date
Sep-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - classification - genetics
Adolescent
Adult
Consanguinity
Face - abnormalities
Finland
Genes, Recessive
Growth Disorders - genetics
Humans
Jews
Limb Deformities, Congenital
Male
Retinal Degeneration - genetics
Syndrome
Abstract
A new familial cases of the Cohen syndrome in two brothers of one-half second-cousin parents is reported. Typical clinical manifestations of the syndrome; i.e., mental deficiency, hypotonia, characteristic facial appearance, long, narrow hands and feet with elongated fingers, and mottled retinae were present in both patients. Both patients also had leukopenia. Clinical manifestations of the Cohen syndrome in patients are highly variable, and mottled retina has been observed in 22 of 87 patients (25%). However, an association of mottled retina in patients with the Cohen syndrome is likely to be related to the families and ethnic groups. Among 19 familial cases, mottled retina was observed in all affected sibs from five families, but in 13 families none of the affected sibs had the mottled retina. All Finnish patients had the mottled retina, but this was noted in only one of 39 Jewish patients. Based on these data, we hypothesize that two alleles at the gene locus for the Cohen syndrome exhibit different clinical manifestations: one is a Finnish type with mottled retina, and the other is a Jewish type without retinal anomalies.
PubMed ID
2240027 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.