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Acute bronchitis in adults. How close do we come to its aetiology in general practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207475
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1997 Sep;15(3):156-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
J S Jonsson
J A Sigurdsson
K G Kristinsson
M. Guthnadóttir
S. Magnusson
Author Affiliation
Gardabaer Community Health Centre, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1997 Sep;15(3):156-60
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bronchitis - blood - diagnosis - microbiology - virology
C-Reactive Protein - analysis - diagnostic use
Chlamydia Infections
Chlamydophila pneumoniae
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Middle Aged
Mycoplasma pneumoniae
Pneumonia, Mycoplasma
Prospective Studies
Virus Diseases - blood - diagnosis
Abstract
To investigate how close we can come to the aetiology of acute bronchitis in adults in a primary care setting.
Prospective study.
General practice population in Gardabaer district, south-western Iceland.
140 patients > or = 16 years old who were diagnosed as having acute bronchitis during a two-year period (1992-1993).
Laboratory investigations (twice with a minimum four-week interval), used in general practice to analyse respiratory tract infections. They included serology for Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, respiratory tract viruses, and the level of C-reactive protein.
Of a total of 140 patients, two blood samples were taken on scheduled time in 113 patients. Serology confirmed recent infection in 18 (16%) of these patients. Only two (2%) had a bacterial infection (one C. pneumoniae, one M. pneumoniae). The others (84%) did not have a significant increase in antibody titres. Only four (4%) had C-reactive protein levels higher than 48 mg/l.
The study indicates that it is difficult to come close to a precise aetiology with respect to infectious agents of acute bronchitis in general practice. We conclude that the disease is rarely caused by atypical bacteria such as C. pneumoniae and M. pneumoniae, and rarely caused by bacterial infections severe enough significantly to increase the level of C-reactive protein.
PubMed ID
9323784 View in PubMed
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Adverse reactions to food and food allergy in young children in Iceland and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33350
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1999 Mar;17(1):30-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
I. Kristjansson
B. Ardal
J S Jonsson
J A Sigurdsson
M. Foldevi
B. Björkstén
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1999 Mar;17(1):30-4
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Infant
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of adverse reactions to food and food allergy in Icelandic and Swedish 18-month-old children. DESIGN: Prospective multicentre comparative study. SETTING: Primary health care centres in Sweden and Iceland. SUBJECTS: A total of 324 children in Iceland and 328 in Sweden who attended for regular 18-month check-up. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adverse reaction to food according to questionnaire, and food allergy according to skin prick tests and double blind food challenge tests. RESULTS: Adverse reactions to food were reported in 27% of children in Iceland and 28% in Sweden. Food allergy was confirmed in 2.0% in both countries. Allergy among other family members was reported in 45% of the Icelandic children and 62% in the Swedish (p
PubMed ID
10229990 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the oral and intravenous routes for treating asthma with methylprednisolone and theophylline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16165
Source
Chest. 1988 Oct;94(4):723-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1988
Author
S. Jónsson
G. Kjartansson
D. Gíslason
H. Helgason
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Vífilsstadir Chest Hospital, Reykjavik.
Source
Chest. 1988 Oct;94(4):723-6
Date
Oct-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Administration, Oral
Aged
Asthma - drug therapy - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Delayed-Action Preparations
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous
Male
Maximal Midexpiratory Flow Rate
Methylprednisolone - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Random Allocation
Theophylline - administration & dosage
Vital Capacity
Abstract
To compare intravenous and orally administered corticosteroids and theophylline in treating acute episodes of airways obstruction, patients with recent worsening of obstructive symptoms were randomly divided into two groups. Group A received methylprednisolone, 80 mg/24 h, and aminophylline by continuous infusion. Group B received a comparable dose of a sustained-release theophylline and methylprednisolone, 80 mg in two equally divided doses, by mouth. Assessment of response was based on daily spirometric tests and evaluation of dyspnea and wheezing. Arterial blood gas and serum theophylline levels were also measured. The groups were comparable with respect to age, sex distribution, smoking history, and spirometric evidence of obstruction. Initial spirometric test results showed moderate obstruction, equal in the two groups. Obstruction improved markedly by both spirometric and clinical criteria in the four-day study period. The improvement in FEV1 and dyspnea index was slightly greater for group B, but the differences were not significant. We conclude that oral administration of steroids and theophylline is as effective as intravenous use in treating hospitalized patients with moderate exacerbations of airways obstruction.
Notes
Comment In: Chest. 1990 May;97(5):1269-702331936
PubMed ID
3168567 View in PubMed
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Gene expression analysis in induced sputum from welders with and without airway-related symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140568
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2011 Jan;84(1):105-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Lena S Jönsson
Jørn Nielsen
Karin Broberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University Hospital, 221 85, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2011 Jan;84(1):105-13
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Gene Expression - genetics
Humans
Inflammation - genetics
Male
Microarray Analysis
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Oxidative Stress
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Respiratory Insufficiency - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Sputum
Sweden
Welding
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify changes in gene expression in the airways among welders, with and without lower airway symptoms, working in black steel.
Included were 25 male, non-smoking welders. Each welder was sampled twice; before exposure (after vacation), and after 1 month of exposure. From the welders (14 symptomatic, of whom 7 had asthma-like symptoms), RNA from induced sputum was obtained for gene expression analysis. Messenger RNA from a subset of the samples (n = 7) was analysed with microarray technology to identify genes of interest. These genes were further analysed using quantitative PCR (qPCR; n = 22).
By comparing samples before and after exposure, the microarray analysis resulted in several functional annotation clusters: the one with the highest enrichment score contained "response to wounding", "inflammatory response" and "defence response". Seven genes were analysed by qPCR: granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (CSF3R), superoxide dismutase 2, interleukin 8, glutathione S-transferase pi 1, tumour necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 6 (TNFAIP6), interleukin 1 receptor type II and matrix metallopeptidase 25 (MMP25). Increased levels of CSF3R, TNFAIP6 and MMP25 were indicated among asthmatic subjects compared to non-symptomatic subjects, although the differences did not reach significance.
Workers' exposure to welding fumes changed gene expression in the lower airways in genes involved in inflammatory and defence response. Thus, microarray and qPCR technique can demonstrate markers of exposure to welding fumes and possible disease-related markers. However, further studies are needed to verify genes involved and to further characterise the mechanism for welding fumes-associated lower airway symptoms.
PubMed ID
20862590 View in PubMed
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IgG subclass response and opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae after vaccination of healthy adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57785
Source
J Infect Dis. 1990 Aug;162(2):482-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
E. Bardardottir
S. Jonsson
I. Jonsdottir
A. Sigfusson
H. Valdimarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, National Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
J Infect Dis. 1990 Aug;162(2):482-8
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Bacterial Vaccines - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - biosynthesis
Infant, Newborn
Male
Opsonin Proteins - immunology
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Vaccination
Abstract
Studies relating opsonization and IgG antibodies to Streptococcus pneumoniae have yielded contradictory results. This study compared changes in opsonization with IgG subclass response after vaccinating healthy subjects with a 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine. Total IgG and IgG subclass antibodies to pneumococcal polysaccharide types 8, 9, and 19 were measured by ELISA. Opsonic activity was assayed using 3H-labeled bacteria and polymorphonuclear leukocytes in different serum concentrations (5%-40%). A substantial postvaccination increase in total and subclass IgG antibody was observed in most subjects, although variations were seen. Postvaccination sera generally gave rise to enhanced opsonization, and a correlation was found between increases in antibody levels and opsonization. This correlation was closest for IgG1 and IgG4 and generally strongest at the lowest serum concentration, but weak or absent at the highest concentration. Thus, vaccination against S. pneumoniae stimulates a variable increase in specific opsonic activity in health persons that is best demonstrated when serum is a limiting factor in the opsonin assay.
PubMed ID
2373875 View in PubMed
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Immune responses of infants vaccinated with serotype 6B pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugated with tetanus toxoid.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57599
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1997 Jul;16(7):667-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
S T Sigurdardottir
G. Vidarsson
T. Gudnason
S. Kjartansson
K G Kristinsson
S. Jonsson
H. Valdimarsson
G. Schiffman
R. Schneerson
I. Jonsdottir
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1997 Jul;16(7):667-74
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin A, Secretory - analysis
Infant
Male
Nasopharynx - microbiology
Phagocytosis
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - adverse effects - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Saliva - immunology
Streptococcus pneumoniae - isolation & purification
Tetanus Toxoid - adverse effects - immunology
Vaccination
Vaccines, Conjugate - immunology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of meningitis, bacteremia, pneumonia and otitis media. Pneumococcal polysaccharides are not immunogenic in infants, but improved immunogenicity of polysaccharide-protein conjugates has been demonstrated. Antibiotic-resistant pneumococci have increased the need for an effective vaccine. OBJECTIVE: To study the safety and immunogenicity of a pneumococcal type 6B polysaccharidetetanus toxoid conjugate (Pn6B-TT) in infants and to assess the function of antibodies. METHODS: Healthy infants were injected, Group A at 3, 4 and 6 months (n = 21) and Group B at 7 and 9 months (n = 19). Booster injection was given at 18 months. Antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and radioimmunoassay, and functional activity was measured by opsonization of radiolabeled pneumococci. Nasopharyngeal cultures were obtained. RESULTS: No significant adverse reactions were observed. Pn6B-IgG (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) increased to a geometric mean of 0.62 microgram/ml (P = 0.367, compared with prevaccination titers) in Group A at 7 months and 1.22 micrograms/ml (P 300 ng of antibody N/ml. Opsonic activity, after initial and booster vaccinations, correlated with Pn6B-antibody titers. Three infants with nasopharyngeal cultures repeatedly positive for serogroup 6 had poor serum IgG responses. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that Pn6B-TT is safe, elicits functional antibodies and memory responses in infants.
PubMed ID
9239771 View in PubMed
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Impact of changes to reimbursement of fixed combinations of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting ß2 -agonists in obstructive lung diseases: a population-based, observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271861
Source
Int J Clin Pract. 2014 Jul;68(7):812-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
U S Björnsdóttir
S T Sigurðardóttir
J S Jonsson
M. Jonsson
G. Telg
M. Thuresson
I. Naya
S. Gizurarson
Source
Int J Clin Pract. 2014 Jul;68(7):812-9
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - economics - therapeutic use
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - economics - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Drug Therapy, Combination - economics
Female
Humans
Iceland
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement - trends
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - drug therapy - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In 2010, the Icelandic government introduced a new cost-saving policy that limited reimbursement of fixed inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting ß2 -agonist (ICS/LABA) combinations.
This population-based, retrospective, observational study assessed the effects of this policy change by linking specialist/primary care medical records with data from the Icelandic Pharmaceutical Database. The policy change took effect on 1 January 2010 (index date); data for the year preceding and following this date were analysed in 8241 patients with controlled/partly controlled asthma and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who had been dispensed an ICS/LABA during 2009. Oral corticosteroid (OCS) and short-acting ß2 -agonist (SABA) use, and healthcare visits, were assessed pre- and post-index.
The ICS/LABA reimbursement policy change led to 47.8% fewer fixed ICS/LABA combinations being dispensed during the post-index period among patients whose asthma and/or COPD was controlled/partly controlled during the pre-index period. Fewer ICS monocomponents were also dispensed. A total of 48.6% of patients were no longer receiving any respiratory medications after the policy change. This was associated with reduced disease control, as demonstrated by more healthcare visits (44.0%), and more OCS (76.3%) and SABA (51.2%) dispensations.
Overall, these findings demonstrate that changes in healthcare policy and medication reimbursement can directly impact medication use and, consequently, clinical outcomes and should, therefore, be made cautiously.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24942308 View in PubMed
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Incidence and outcomes of surgical resection for giant pulmonary bullae--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120793
Source
Scand J Surg. 2012;101(3):166-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
S I Gunnarsson
K B Johannesson
M. Gudjonsdottir
B. Magnusson
S. Jonsson
T. Gudbjartsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Surg. 2012;101(3):166-9
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blister - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Lung Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Pulmonary Emphysema - complications
Registries
Respiratory Function Tests
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Giant pulmonary bullae (GPB) are rare and there is little information on incidence, long-term prognosis, and outcome of treatment.
To assess the incidence of GPB in the Icelandic population and to evaluate the outcome of surgical treatment.
Twelve consecutive patients (11 males; mean age 60 ± 15.7 years) underwent resection for GPB in Iceland between 1992 and 2009. All were heavy smokers and had bullae occupying > 30% of the involved lung. There were 8 bilateral and 3 unilateral bullectomies and one lobectomy. Pulmonary function tests were performed preoperatively, and at one month and 5.4 years postoperatively. Age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) was calculated, complications and operative mortality were registered, and overall survival was estimated. Mean follow-up time was 8.2 years.
The ASR for GPB was 0.40 and 0.03 per 100,000 per year for men and women, respectively. There was no operative mortality, but prolonged air leakage (75%) and pneumonia (17%) were the most common postoperative complications. One month postoperatively, mean FEV1 increased from 1.0 ± 0.48 L (33% predicted) to 1.75 ± 0.75 L (57.5% predicted) (p
PubMed ID
22968239 View in PubMed
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Influence of glutathione-related genes on symptoms and immunologic markers among vulcanization workers in the southern Sweden rubber industries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159907
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2008 Jul;81(7):913-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Lena S Jönsson
Bo A G Jönsson
Anna Axmon
Margareta Littorin
Karin Broberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, 221 85, Lund, Sweden. lena_s.jonsson@med.lu.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2008 Jul;81(7):913-9
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - immunology
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - analysis - urine
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Immunity, Cellular
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Industry
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Questionnaires
Rubber
Sweden
Abstract
The aim was to elucidate the role of genetic variants on symptoms of the eyes and airways, headache and nausea, as well as on immunologic markers, among vulcanization workers in the contemporary Swedish rubber industry. Polymorphisms in genes, which are involved in the defense against reactive oxygen species and metabolism of toxic substances present in the vulcanization fumes, were analyzed.
One hundred and forty-five exposed and 117 unexposed workers were included in the study. Medical and occupational histories were obtained in structured interviews. Symptoms were recorded and immunologic markers analyzed in blood. Polymorphisms in glutathione-related genes (glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC)-129, glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM)-588, glutathione S-transferase alpha 1 (GSTA1)-52, GSTM1*O, GSTP1-105, GSTP1-114, and GSTT1*O) were analyzed by Taqman-based allelic discrimination and ordinary PCR.
A protective effect of GSTA1-52 (G/A + A/A) genotype on symptoms and immunologic cells, in particular among exposed workers, was suggested. Exposed workers with GSTT1*O had increased risk of nosebleed compared to exposed workers with GSTT1*1. Exposed workers with GSTP1-105 (ile/val + val/val) had decreased levels of total immunoglobulin E (IgE) compared to exposed workers with GSTP1-105 ile/ile. GCLC-129 variant genotype demonstrated increased levels of immunologic cells among exposed workers, although statistical significance was not reached.
Our data indicate that hereditary factors influence the susceptibility to symptoms and the immunologic response of workers in the rubber industry.
PubMed ID
18066575 View in PubMed
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Influence of obesity on cardiovascular risk. Twenty-three-year follow-up of 22,025 men from an urban Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19002
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Aug;26(8):1046-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
S. Jonsson
B. Hedblad
G. Engström
P. Nilsson
G. Berglund
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Aug;26(8):1046-53
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood glucose
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Heart rate
Humans
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban health
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess to what extent the incidence of coronary events and death related to smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes is modified by obesity. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SUBJECTS: A total of 22 025 men aged 27 to 61-y-old at entry. MEASUREMENTS: Incidence of coronary events (CE, ie acute myocardial infarctions and deaths due to chronic ischaemic heart disease) and death during 23 y of follow-up was studied in relation to body mass index (BMI), heart rate, blood pressure, blood lipids, glucose and insulin, lifestyle factors, history of angina pectoris, history of cancer, self-reported health and socio-economic conditions. RESULTS: At the end of follow-up 20% of the obese men were no longer alive, and 13% had had a coronary event. Incidence of CE was 16% lower (RR (relative risk) 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.65-1.10) among underweight (n=1171), 24% higher (RR 1.24; CI 1.12-1.37) among overweight (n=7773), and 76% higher (RR 1.76; 95% CI 1.49-2.08) among obese men (n=1343) than it was among men with normal BMI (n=11 738). The risk associated with overweight and obesity remained statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders (RR 1.18; CI 1.07-1.31; and 1.39; 1.17-1.65, respectively). The association between BMI and mortality was J-shaped. In all, 1.7% of the obese men were smokers with hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and diabetes, 16.3% were not exposed to any of these risk factors. The cardiovascular risk associated with obesity was small in the absence of other risk factors. Between smoking and obesity there was a statistically significant synergistic effect. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity is associated with an increased incidence of coronary events and death. The risk associated with obesity is substantially increased by exposure to other atherosclerotic risk factors, of which smoking seems to be the most important. The preventive potential of these associations should be evaluated in controlled trials.
PubMed ID
12119569 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.