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Advanced maternal age increases the risk of very preterm birth, irrespective of parity: a population-based register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296725
Source
BJOG. 2017 Jul; 124(8):1235-1244
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
U Waldenström
S Cnattingius
L Vixner
M Norman
Author Affiliation
Division of Reproductive Health, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BJOG. 2017 Jul; 124(8):1235-1244
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Extremely Premature
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate whether advanced maternal age is associated with preterm birth, irrespective of parity.
Population-based registry study.
Swedish Medical Birth Register.
First, second, and third live singleton births to women aged 20 years or older in Sweden, from 1990 to 2011 (n = 2 009 068).
Logistic regression analysis was used in each parity group to estimate risks of very and moderately preterm births to women at 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, and 40 years or older, using 25-29 years as the reference group. Odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for year of birth, education, country of birth, smoking, body mass index, and history of preterm birth. Age-related risks of spontaneous and medically indicated preterm births were also investigated.
Very preterm (22-31 weeks of gestation) and moderately preterm (32-36 weeks) births.
Risks of very preterm birth increased with maternal age, irrespective of parity: adjusted ORs in first, second, and third births ranged from 1.18 to 1.28 at 30-34 years, from 1.59 to 1.70 at 35-39 years, and from 1.97 to 2.40 at =40 years. In moderately preterm births, age-related associations were weaker, but were statistically significant from 35-39 years in all parity groups. Advanced maternal age increased the risks of both spontaneous and medically indicated preterm births.
Advanced maternal age is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth, irrespective of parity, especially very preterm birth. Women aged 35 years and older, expecting their first, second, or third births, should be regarded as a risk group for very preterm birth.
Women aged 35 years and older should be regarded as a risk group for very preterm birth, irrespective of parity.
Notes
CommentIn: BJOG. 2017 Jul;124(8):1245 PMID 28029213
PubMed ID
27770495 View in PubMed
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Aetiology of teenage childbearing: reasons for familial effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63962
Source
Twin Res. 2000 Mar;3(1):23-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
P O Olausson
P. Lichtenstein
S. Cnattingius
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. petra.otterblad@mep.ki.se
Source
Twin Res. 2000 Mar;3(1):23-7
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Environment
Female
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Personality
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Twins - genetics - psychology
Abstract
The aims of the present study were to evaluate the contribution of the genetic and environmental factors to the risk of teenage childbearing, and to study whether life style, socio-economic conditions, and personality traits could explain possible familial effects. We linked two population-based registers: the Swedish Twin Register and the Swedish Medical Birth Register. The study covers female twin pairs born between 1953 and 1958, having their first infant before the age of 30 years (n = 1885). In order to separate familial effects from other environmental influences, and genetic effects from shared environmental effects, only complete twin pairs with known zygosity were included, in all 260 monozygotic and 370 dizygotic twin pairs. We used quantitative genetic analyses to evaluate the importance of genetic and environmental effects for liability to teenage childbearing. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the effects of life style, socio-economic situation, and personality on the probability of teenage childbearing, and to study whether psychosocial factors could explain possible familial effects. Fifty-nine percent (0-76%) of the variance in being a teenage mother was attributable to heritable factors; 0% (0-49%) was due to shared environmental factors; and 41% (23-67%) was explained by non-shared environmental factors. Thus, the data were consistent with the hypothesis that the familial aggregation of teenage childbearing is completely explained by genetic factors, although the alternative hypothesis that familial aggregation is entirely explained by shared environmental factors cannot be ruled out. Significant effects of smoking habits, housing conditions, and educational level were found in relation to liability to teenage childbearing. However, the familial effects on risk of teenage childbearing were not mediated through similarities in life style and socio-economic factors. When studying risk factors for teenage childbearing, it is recommended to include life style and socio-economic variables as well as information about family history of teenage childbearing. Twin Research (2000) 3, 23-27.
PubMed ID
10808237 View in PubMed
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Antenatal screening for small-for-gestational-age, using risk factors and measurements of the symphysis-fundus distance--6 years of experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59999
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1988 Dec;18(2-3):191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1988
Author
S. Cnattingius
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1988 Dec;18(2-3):191-7
Date
Dec-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Diagnosis
Pubic Symphysis - anatomy & histology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
In a previous prospective study, we outlined a screening programme aiming at detection of a high-risk group for small-for-gestational-age (SGA) pregnancies. The present study evaluates this screening programme in all women delivering at the hospital in 1 year and in all women delivering SGA infants during a 6-year period. When screening for SGA, using symphysis-fundus measurements together with risk factors, the false positive rates were unacceptably high. When only using repeated measurements of the symphysis-fundus distance the results were more acceptable (sensitivity 59%, specificity 97%, positive predictive value 15%). Between 1980 to 1985, 18,604 live singleton infants were born. Altogether 156 infants were assessed as SGA (birthweight for gestational age less than -2 S.D.). Two antenatal records from SGA pregnancies were missing and in 14 pregnancies, antenatal detection of SGA would not have improved the prognosis of the infants (severe congenital malformations or preterm delivery due to maternal diseases). Thus, of 140 SGA pregnancies in focus pathological symphysis-fundus measurements occurred in 63%. It is concluded that by repeated measurements of the symphysis-fundus distance, it is quite possible to form a high-risk group for SGA. In this high-risk group, including less than 4% of the pregnant population, the majority of SGA pregnancies are found.
PubMed ID
3224582 View in PubMed
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Are prenatal, obstetric, and infant complications associated with postpartum psychosis among women with pre-conception psychiatric hospitalisations?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118550
Source
BJOG. 2013 Mar;120(4):446-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
W L Hellerstedt
S M Phelan
S. Cnattingius
C M Hultman
B L Harlow
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA. helle023@umn.edu
Source
BJOG. 2013 Mar;120(4):446-55
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - complications - epidemiology
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Preconception Care - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Puerperal Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the associations of maternal and infant complications with postpartum hospitalisation for psychosis in women with a pre-conception history of psychiatric hospitalisation.
Population-based study.
Swedish medical birth register.
Primiparous women who gave birth between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 2001, and who had a pre-conception history of psychiatric hospitalisation but who were not hospitalised during pregnancy (n = 1842).
International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes were used to identify prenatal, obstetric, postpartum maternal complications, and newborn health conditions. We used multivariable logistic regression to describe the associations between maternal and infant health conditions and the odds for postpartum hospitalisation for psychosis.
Psychiatric hospitalisation within 90 days of delivery.
Compared with women who did not have a postpartum psychiatric hospitalisation, hospitalised women were at 2.3 times higher odds (95% CI 1.0-4.9) of having non-psychiatric puerperium complications (e.g. infection, lactation problems or venous complications). No other maternal complications were associated with postpartum psychiatric hospitalisation. Although their infants were at no higher odds for health complications, the offspring of women who had a postpartum psychiatric hospitalisation were at 4.1 times higher odds (95% CI 1.3-12.6) of death within the first 365 days of life than those of women who were not hospitalised.
We found no prenatal indicators of postpartum risk for psychiatric hospitalisation among high-risk women, but they had higher odds of postpartum pregnancy-related medical problems and, rarely, offspring death.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23194279 View in PubMed
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[Better individual adaptation in future maternal health care. Routine check-ups are based on weak scientific grounds]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65102
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jan 30;88(5):331-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1991
Author
G. Lindmark
S. Cnattingius
Author Affiliation
Kvinnokliniken, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jan 30;88(5):331-4
Date
Jan-30-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Maternal Health Services - trends
Maternal Welfare - trends
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis
Prenatal Diagnosis - methods
Sweden
PubMed ID
1997773 View in PubMed
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Birth characteristics and different dimensions of intellectual performance in young males: a nationwide population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58339
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2003 Oct;92(10):1138-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
E M Lundgren
S. Cnattingius
B. Jonsson
T. Tuvemo
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. Maria.Lundgren@kbh.uu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2003 Oct;92(10):1138-43
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body Height
Body mass index
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Male
Population Surveillance
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
AIM: To study the effect of size at birth on different dimensions of intellectual capacity. METHODS: The study comprised a population-based cohort including all male single births without congenital malformations in Sweden from 1973 to 1976, and conscripted before 1994 (n = 168 068). Information from the Swedish Birth Register was individually linked to the Swedish Conscript Register. The test of intellectual performance included four different dimensions: logical, spatial, theoretical and verbal capacity. These data were available for 80-86% of the males at conscription. RESULTS: Compared with boys born appropriate for gestational age, males born small for gestational age (SGA) had an increased risk for subnormal performance in all four dimensions. Among males born SGA who were also of short adult stature at conscription, and in individuals born SGA with a head circumference
PubMed ID
14632327 View in PubMed
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Birth weight and risk of angina pectoris: analysis in Swedish twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53502
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2003;18(6):539-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
A. Hubinette
S. Cnattingius
A L V Johansson
C. Henriksson
P. Lichtenstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.hubinette@mep.ki.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2003;18(6):539-44
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology
Birth weight
Comparative Study
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Intrauterine nutrition approximated by birth weight has been shown to be inversely associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). By investigating the association within twin pairs discordant for disease, the influence of genetic and early environmental factors is substantially reduced. METHODS: We have investigated the association between birth weight and angina pectoris in same-sexed twins with known zygosity included in the population-based Swedish Twin Registry. Self-reports of birth weight and angina pectoris were collected in a telephone interview between 1998 and 2000. The cohort analyses were based on 4594 same-sexed twins, and the within-pair analyses included 55 dizygotic and 37 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for angina pectoris. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by logistic regression. RESULTS: Compared with birth weight between 2.0 and 2.9 kg, low birth weight (
PubMed ID
12908719 View in PubMed
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Birthweight discordant female twins and their offspring: is the intergenerational influence on birthweight due to genes or environment?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119612
Source
Hum Reprod. 2013 Feb;28(2):480-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
L. Högberg
C. Lundholm
S. Cnattingius
S. Oberg
A N Iliadou
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, PO Box 281, Stockholm SE-171 77, Sweden. lovisa.hogberg@ki.se
Source
Hum Reprod. 2013 Feb;28(2):480-7
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Birth Weight - genetics
Cohort Studies
Environment
Female
Fetal Development
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins
Abstract
Does the intergenerational influence on birthweight and birth length remain within female dizygotic and monozygotic twin pairs?
The intergenerational influence on birthweight and birth length remained within dizygotic but not within monozygotic twin pairs.
Low birthweight is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in both the short and long term; therefore it is important to understand determinants of fetal growth. There is a known intergenerational association between parents' and offspring's size at birth.
This is a register-based cohort study with a nested within-twin-pair comparison. The study is retrospective, but based on prospectively collected information. The study population included 8685 monozygotic and like-sexed dizygotic female twins born in Sweden from 1926 to 1985, who had given birth to their first infant between 1973 and 2009.
This study is set in Sweden and used data from the Swedish Twin Register and the Swedish Medical Birth Register. We used generalized estimating equations to obtain regression coefficients with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the outcomes: offspring birthweight and birth length. To control for genetic and shared environmental factors, we performed within-twin-pair analyses in 1479 dizygotic and 1526 monozygotic twin pairs.
In the cohort of both dizygotic and monozygotic twins, there was an association between mother's and offspring's size at birth. Within-dizygotic twin pairs, a 500-g increase from the twin pair's mean birthweight was associated with increased offspring birthweight [70 g (95% CI: 35-106)] and birth length [0.22 cm (95% CI: 0.07-0.38)]. The corresponding increase in birth length of 1 cm was estimated to increase offspring's birthweight by 26 g (95% CI: 12-40) and birth length by 0.11 cm (95% CI: 0.04-0.17). Within-monozygotic twin pairs there were no such associations.
This study is limited to twins who themselves or whose co-twin voluntarily responded to questionnaires.
The intergenerational influence on size at birth is suggested to be due to direct or indirect genetic factors.
PubMed ID
23087023 View in PubMed
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Birthweight, early environment, and genetics: a study of twins discordant for acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53898
Source
Lancet. 2001 Jun 23;357(9273):1997-2001
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-23-2001
Author
A. Hübinette
S. Cnattingius
A. Ekbom
U. de Faire
M. Kramer
P. Lichtenstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Anna.Hubinette@mep.ki.se
Source
Lancet. 2001 Jun 23;357(9273):1997-2001
Date
Jun-23-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Case-Control Studies
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - etiology
Environment
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies that used birthweight as a crude marker of fetal growth have suggested that low birthweight is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Through investigation of this association within same-sexed twin pairs, confounding by genetic and early environmental factors can be greatly decreased. We undertook a case-control study in twins discordant for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). METHODS: The case-control study was nested within the population-based Swedish Twin Registry and linked with the national cause-of-death and hospital-discharge registries. We manually retrieved birth records containing information on birth and maternal characteristics for 132 same-sexed twin pairs discordant for AMI and 118 individually matched control twin pairs. FINDINGS: In comparisons between AMI cases and external matched control twins, cases had significantly lower birthweight (mean 2556 [SD 500] vs 2699 [530] g, p=0.04), birth length (47.1 [2.8] vs 47.9 [2.7] cm, p=0.04), and head circumference (33.0 [1.8] vs 33.5 [2.0] cm, p=0.03) than controls. In within-pair comparisons between AMI cases and healthy co-twins, no significant differences in birth measurements were found (birthweight 2458 [510] vs 2534 [530] g, p=0.73; birth length 47.1 [2.8] vs 47.2 [2.8] cm, p=0.91; head circumference 33.0 [1.7] vs 33.0 [1.8] cm, p=0.92). INTERPRETATION: The lack of an association between birth characteristics and AMI within twin pairs suggests that previously reported associations may be influenced by genetic and early environmental factors, or possibly, by unmeasured maternal factors that operate independently of birthweight.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2001 Jun 23;357(9273):1990-111438125
PubMed ID
11438130 View in PubMed
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Caffeine intake and the risk of first-trimester spontaneous abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63874
Source
N Engl J Med. 2000 Dec 21;343(25):1839-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-2000
Author
S. Cnattingius
L B Signorello
G. Annerén
B. Clausson
A. Ekbom
E. Ljunger
W J Blot
J K McLaughlin
G. Petersson
A. Rane
F. Granath
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
N Engl J Med. 2000 Dec 21;343(25):1839-45
Date
Dec-21-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - chemically induced
Adolescent
Adult
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosome Disorders
Coffee - adverse effects
Female
Fetus
Gestational Age
Humans
Karyotyping
Multivariate Analysis
Nausea
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some epidemiologic studies have suggested that the ingestion of caffeine increases the risk of spontaneous abortion, but the results have been inconsistent. METHODS: We performed a population-based, case-control study of early spontaneous abortion in Uppsala County, Sweden. The subjects were 562 women who had spontaneous abortion at 6 to 12 completed weeks of gestation (the case patients) and 953 women who did not have spontaneous abortion and were matched to the case patients according to the week of gestation (controls). Information on the ingestion of caffeine was obtained from in-person interviews. Plasma cotinine was measured as an indicator of cigarette smoking, and fetal karyotypes were determined from tissue samples. Multivariate analysis was used to estimate the relative risks associated with caffeine ingestion after adjustment for smoking and symptoms of pregnancy such as nausea, vomiting, and tiredness. RESULTS: Among nonsmokers, more spontaneous abortions occurred in women who ingested at least 100 mg of caffeine per day than in women who ingested less than 100 mg per day, with the increase in risk related to the amount ingested (100 to 299 mg per day: odds ratio, 1.3; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.9 to 1.8; 300 to 499 mg per day: odds ratio, 1.4; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.9 to 2.0; and 500 mg or more per day: odds ratio, 2.2; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.3 to 3.8). Among smokers, caffeine ingestion was not associated with an excess risk of spontaneous abortion. When the analyses were stratified according to the results of karyotyping, the ingestion of moderate or high levels of caffeine was found to be associated with an excess risk of spontaneous abortion when the fetus had a normal or unknown karyotype but not when the fetal karyotype was abnormal. CONCLUSIONS: The ingestion of caffeine may increase the risk of an early spontaneous abortion among non-smoking women carrying fetuses with normal karyotypes.
PubMed ID
11117975 View in PubMed
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118 records – page 1 of 12.