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Association between depressed mood in the elderly and a 5-HTR2A gene variant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45905
Source
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2003 Jul 1;120(1):79-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2003
Author
M. Jansson
M. Gatz
S. Berg
B. Johansson
B. Malmberg
G E McClearn
M. Schalling
N L Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. martja@mbox.ki.se
Source
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2003 Jul 1;120(1):79-84
Date
Jul-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Depressive Disorder - etiology - genetics
Diseases in Twins - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Factors
Sweden
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate any possible association between depressed mood in the elderly and two candidate SNPs in the serotonin system: one in the 5-HTR2A gene promotor (-1438 G/A) and one in the 5-HT transporter gene (-925 C/A). DNA from a population-based Swedish twin sample (N = 1,592; mean age = 73) was genotyped using Pryosequencing trade mark. An association was found between the 5-HTR2A gene promotor polymorphism and depressed mood (OR: 1.5, CI: 1.1-2.1) for the A/A genotype in the total sample. When the sample was analyzed by gender, a significant association (OR: 2.4, CI: 1.4-4.4) was found for males and the A/A genotype, but not for females. The 5-HT transporter gene was not associated with depressed mood in this elderly population. These results suggest that there might be different genetic mechanisms for males and females contributing to the development of depressed mood in the elderly.
PubMed ID
12815744 View in PubMed
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Association of biochemical values with morbidity in the elderly: a population-based Swedish study of persons aged 82 or more years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13846
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2003;63(7-8):457-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
S E Nilsson
S. Takkinen
N. Tryding
P E Evrin
S. Berg
G. McClearn
B. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden. gero@hhj.hj.se
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2003;63(7-8):457-66
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Chemical Analysis
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Creatine - blood
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Furosemide - therapeutic use
Gout - blood - epidemiology
Heart Failure, Congestive - blood - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - blood - epidemiology
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Morbidity
Osteoporosis - blood - epidemiology
Peptic Ulcer - blood
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Serum Albumin - analysis
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins - statistics & numerical data
Urea - blood
Uric Acid - blood
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Various inter-dependent factors influence serum biochemical values. In the elderly, the impact of these factors may differ compared with younger age groups and therefore population-based studies among older people are needed. The specific morbidity in old age, including also various types of drug therapy, should be observed. METHODS: Various biochemical tests in 349 females and 186 males over 81 years of age were carried out and the associations of biochemical values with morbidity, drug therapy, anthropometry and gender were estimated. RESULTS: Biochemical serum values deviate in various diseases, characterized by increased frequency in the elderly, i.e. congestive heart failure, osteoporosis, hip fractures, depression and dementia. All of these diseases present a tendency to increased homocysteine, usually combined with low folate. Cases with intact cognitive function throughout the six years after sampling are characterized by low homocysteine, which is the opposite of what is found in dementia. Furthermore, congestive heart failure is associated with impaired creatinine clearance and increased urea and urate, and osteoporosis and hip fractures are characterized by low albumin and cholesterol. Increased values for urate and impaired creatinine clearance are found in coronary diseases. In gout, multiple biochemical changes take place. For cases with a history of diabetes, arterial hypertension, peptic ulcer and malignancy, few changes are found compared with the values of the total sample. Furosemide therapy is associated with the same pattern as congestive heart failure, and laxative treatment is characterized by low folate and high homocysteine values.
PubMed ID
14743954 View in PubMed
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Back symptoms and psychological perception of work. A study among nursing aides in a geriatric hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250435
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1977;9(2):61-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
O. Dehlin
S. Berg
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1977;9(2):61-5
Date
1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Back Pain
Female
Geriatric Nursing
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Nurses' Aides
Occupational Diseases
Psychology
Sweden
Abstract
233 nursing aides in a geriatric hospital were interviewed about back symptoms and asked to fill in a questionnaire about their psychological perception of their work. Seven psychological scales and a variable of the overall satisfaction with the job were tested against the presence/absence of cervical, thoracic and low-back symptoms. Nursing aides with thoracic and low-back symptoms exhibited in general a lower level of overall satisfaction with the job, perceived more negative relations with supervisors and workmates and perceived greater strain and a greater demand for physical and psychic strength. The psychological perception of the work was, however, only partly related to the presence/absence of back symptoms.
PubMed ID
143060 View in PubMed
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Characterization of the COL2A1 VNTR polymorphism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36286
Source
Genomics. 1993 May;16(2):350-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
E S Berg
B. Olaisen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, Norway.
Source
Genomics. 1993 May;16(2):350-4
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Amino Acid Sequence
Base Sequence
Child
Collagen - genetics
Comparative Study
DNA, Satellite - genetics
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
France
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Norway
Nucleic Acid Denaturation
Phenotype
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid
Terminology
Abstract
The variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) region 3' to the collagen type II gene (COL2A1) was amplified in vitro by the polymerase chain reaction. Subsequent high-resolution gel electrophoresis showed that the five earlier reported alleles could be further subtyped. A total of 17 allelic variants with a heterozygosity of 73.0% were found in 202 unrelated Norwegians. DNA sequencing of 19 COL2A1 alleles has been performed. The internal organization of the VNTR was common for all alleles, as previously shown for a few alleles. Moreover, the polymorphism in the COL2A1 locus is mainly due to variation in the numbers of copies of two repeat units, containing 34 and 31 bp, respectively, and/or to small deletions in either of the two units. DNA sequencing of alleles with the same electrophoretic size revealed no heterogeneity such as an alternating order of the different units, a feature that might have been expected to be the result of unequal crossing-over events. The observed ordered structure of the VNTR and the possibility of single-stranded DNA from the cores in the VNTR forming hairpins and loops suggest that the COL2A1 polymorphism may have evolved mainly by replication slippage mechanisms.
PubMed ID
8314574 View in PubMed
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Clustering of enterococcal infections in a general intensive care unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58372
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2003 Jul;54(3):188-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
A. Samuelsson
J. Jonasson
H-J Monstein
S. Berg
B. Isaksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, University Hospital, Linköping S-581 85, Sweden. Annika.Samuelsson@lio.se
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2003 Jul;54(3):188-95
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cluster analysis
Comparative Study
Drug Utilization
Enterococcus
Female
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infection Control - methods
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This is a retrospective study comparing patients' characteristics, antibiotic consumption and environmental contamination before the impact of a new regimen of intensified infection control measures in a general intensive care unit (ICU) at a university-affiliated tertiary-care teaching hospital. The new regimen consisted of (1) reorganization of patient rooms (2) improved hygienic measures including strict hygiene barrier nursing (3) more isolated patient care and (4) more restrictive use of antibiotics. The regimen was introduced after a cluster of enterococcal infections. All patients admitted to the ICU from 1 March 1995 to 28 february 1997 were included. A study period of 12 months after reorganization of the ward was compared with the 12 months immediately before it. The antibiotic consumption, the individual patient's severity of disease (APACHE score), and the extent of therapeutic interventions (TISS score) were recorded. Enterococci were typed biochemically, antibiograms were established and the relation between the isolates was investigated with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The bacteriological results and the patient data suggested a hospital-acquired spread as the cause of the ICU enterococcal outbreak. After implementation of the new regimen, we observed a reduction in the rate of enterococcal bloodstream infections from 3.1 to 1.8%. The consumption of antibiotics fell from 6.11 to 4.24 defined daily doses per patient. The introduction of strict hygiene and barrier nursing, more restrictive use of antibiotics, isolation of infected patients, thorough cleaning and disinfection of the unit was followed by an absence of enterococcal infection clustering and reduction in incidence of enterococcal bacteraemia. We were not able to determine whether the reduction in antibiotic consumption was due to the intervention programme.
PubMed ID
12855233 View in PubMed
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Cognitive function in 70-year-old men and women. A 16-year cohort difference population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72534
Source
Aging (Milano). 1998 Apr;10(2):120-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
G. Steen
S. Berg
B. Steen
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Aging (Milano). 1998 Apr;10(2):120-6
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - psychology
Cognition
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Educational Status
Female
Health status
Humans
Intelligence Tests
Life expectancy
Male
Psychometrics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Cohort differences in cognitive functioning were studied in two 70-year-old samples born 16 years apart, 1906/07 and 1922, and living in Göteborg, Sweden. Psychometric tests measuring verbal ability, inductive reasoning, spatial ability, perceptual speed, secondary memory, and primary memory were used. All tests showed significantly better results in the latter 70-year-old cohort. Longer education and better living conditions in this cohort help to explain the results. Differences in somatic health could not explain the cognitive differences in this population. If biological age is defined as inversely related to the remainder of an individual's life span, the increasing life expectancy also means that the 70-year olds in 1992 are biologically younger than their 1976/77 counterparts.
PubMed ID
9666192 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cognitive functioning and survival in psychogeriatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225921
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1991 Aug;84(2):160-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
S. Berg
L. Jeppson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Geronology, Jönköping County Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1991 Aug;84(2):160-2
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Cognition Disorders - mortality - psychology
Dementia - mortality - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The relationship between cognitive functioning and survival was studied among 92 people referred to a psychogeriatric assessment unit. A follow-up 4-5 years later showed that the nonsurvivors initially had lower scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) than the survivors. The differences were greatest among individuals with nondementia diagnosis. Survival curves showed that about 50% of those who scored less than or equal to 19 on MMSE had died within 2 years but more than 60% of those who scored greater than or equal to 20 were still alive 4-5 years after the initial assessment.
PubMed ID
1950610 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Communication by way of a computer in intensive care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211679
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Jun 19;93(25):2428-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-19-1996

62 records – page 1 of 7.