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Blastocystis: unravelling potential risk factors and clinical significance of a common but neglected parasite.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151340
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Nov;137(11):1655-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
C R Stensvold
H C Lewis
A M Hammerum
L J Porsbo
S S Nielsen
K E P Olsen
M C Arendrup
H V Nielsen
K. Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology, Mycology and Parasitology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. RUN@ssi.dk
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Nov;137(11):1655-63
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Antiparasitic Agents - therapeutic use
Blastocystis - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Blastocystis Infections - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dientamoeba - isolation & purification
Dientamoebiasis - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - parasitology
Male
Metronidazole - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Treatment Failure
Young Adult
Abstract
Two independent studies were conducted to describe symptoms and potential risk factors associated with Blastocystis infection. Isolates were subtyped by molecular analysis. In the NORMAT study (126 individuals randomly sampled from the general population) 24 (19%) were positive for Blastocystis. Blastocystis was associated with irritable bowel syndrome (P=0.04), contact with pigs (P
PubMed ID
19393117 View in PubMed
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A cross-sectional study of paratuberculosis in 1155 Danish dairy cows.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63940
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2000 Jul 3;46(1):15-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-3-2000
Author
M B Jakobsen
L. Alban
S S Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Animal Science and Animal Health, Division of Ethology and Health, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Grønnegårdsvej 8, DK-1870, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2000 Jul 3;46(1):15-27
Date
Jul-3-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Lactation
Milk - microbiology
Mycobacterium paratuberculosis - isolation & purification
Paratuberculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Parity
Probability
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Species Specificity
Abstract
In a cross-sectional study on milk samples from 1155 cows from 22 Danish dairy herds, selected risk factors for paratuberculosis were identified. The diagnostic procedure used was an indirect enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) to detect antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. A sample was considered test-positive if it had a corrected optical density >/=0. 025 (test sensitivity 71.4% and test specificity 89.7%). Of the 1155 samples, 8.8% (102/1155) were test-positive, and 19 out of the 22 dairy herds had >/=1 test-positive cows. The significant risk factors in a multiple logistic regression analysis were: Jersey versus large breeds, high parity versus low parity, the first month after calving versus other months of lactation, and a large herd size compared to a small herd size. The highest probability (37-38%) of a positive test was observed among older cows (parity >4) and tested within the first month after calving (irrespective of breed). The lowest probability (2%) of a positive test-result was observed among first parity, large-breed cows tested before calving or later than one month after.
PubMed ID
10854933 View in PubMed
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Data from the Danish veterinary cancer registry on the occurrence and distribution of neoplasms in dogs in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97051
Source
Vet Rec. 2010 May 8;166(19):586-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-2010
Author
L B Brønden
S S Nielsen
N. Toft
A T Kristensen
Author Affiliation
DACVIM-SA, DECVIM-CA and Oncology, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Dyrlaegevej 16, Frederiksberg 1875, Denmark.
Source
Vet Rec. 2010 May 8;166(19):586-90
Date
May-8-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Breeding
Denmark - epidemiology
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Dogs
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Male
Morbidity
Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology - veterinary
Pedigree
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
From May 15, 2005 to April 15, 2008, 1878 cases of neoplasms in dogs were reported to the web-based Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry. The proportions of malignant (38 per cent) and benign (45 per cent) tumours were similar. The most common malignant neoplasms were adenocarcinomas (21 per cent), mast cell tumours (19 per cent) and lymphomas (17 per cent). The benign neoplasms most commonly encountered were lipomas (24 per cent), adenomas (22 per cent) and histiocytomas (14 per cent). Skin (43 per cent) and the female reproductive system including mammary tissue (28 per cent) were the most common locations of neoplasia. There was a distinct breed predisposition for tumour development, with a high standard morbidity ratio (indicating a higher risk of cancer) for boxers and Bernese mountain dogs. A standard morbidity ratio below 1 was observed in German shepherd dogs and Danish/Swedish farm dogs, suggesting a lower risk of cancer in these breeds.
PubMed ID
20453236 View in PubMed
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Effect of management practices on paratuberculosis prevalence in Danish dairy herds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101772
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2011 Apr;94(4):1849-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
S S Nielsen
N. Toft
Author Affiliation
Department of Large Animal Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Grønnegårdsvej 8, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. ssn@life.ku.dk
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2011 Apr;94(4):1849-57
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - methods
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - blood - epidemiology - microbiology
Dairying - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis - immunology
Paratuberculosis - blood - epidemiology - microbiology
Prevalence
Abstract
A voluntary risk-based control program on paratuberculosis in dairy cattle was initiated in Denmark in 2006. Cows were categorized as high-risk (antibody-positive at least once within the last 3 tests) or low-risk animals based on the results of 3 to 4 annual milk ELISA detecting Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP)-specific antibodies. High-risk animals require management practices aimed at decreasing calf exposure to MAP-contaminated colostrum and milk, and feces originating from these cows. Moreover, repeated test-positive cows are recommended for slaughter before next calving. The objective was to assess the effect of different management practices on the prevalence of MAP-specific antibodies. A questionnaire on management practices was distributed to 1,261 participating herds in December 2008. A total of 1,092 (87%) herd managers returned the questionnaire. Repeated prevalence data from 1,081 herds were available for a period up to 4.25 yr after the first test round. The changes in the prevalence of MAP-specific antibodies from the start of interventions were assessed using a hierarchical logistic model, where different management practices were assessed: a) culling of repeated test-positive cows, b) separation of high-risk from low-risk cows in calving areas, c) cleaning of calving areas after high-risk cows calved, d) removal of calves born to high-risk dams within 2h after calving, e) use of colostrum for feeding of heifer calves from low-risk cows only, f) use of waste milk for feeding of heifer calves from low-risk cows only, g) herd size, and h) proportion of purchased animals. Multivariable analyses suggested that only the proportion of purchased animals (>15% purchased animals as well as 0 to 15% purchased animals compared with no purchased animals in the herd), culling of repeated test-positive animals, and use of waste milk from specific cow groups influenced the decrease in prevalence of MAP-specific antibodies. The control program has been running for just 4.25 yr, and it is assumed that the full effect of the risk-based management practices will only be observed after 4 to 8 yr. Therefore, lack of association between some practices and decrease in prevalence may be a reflection of a short study period. Furthermore, decreases in the prevalence of MAP-specific antibodies may not reflect discontinued transmission of MAP in all age groups.
PubMed ID
21426974 View in PubMed
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Increased incidence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections detected by laboratory-based surveillance in Denmark in 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139227
Source
Euro Surveill. 2010;15(45)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
J N Rasmussen
M. Voldstedlund
R L Andersen
S. Ellermann-Eriksen
T G Jensen
H K Johansen
B. Kolmos
M. Mølvadgaard
S S Nielsen
E. Olsen
K. Schønning
S A Uldum
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2010;15(45)
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Denmark - epidemiology
Epidemics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Laboratories
Mycoplasma pneumoniae - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Pneumonia, Mycoplasma - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Population Surveillance
Abstract
In Denmark recurrent epidemics of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections have been described since the 1950s at intervals of approximately four to six years. The latest epidemic occurred in 2004/05 followed by two years of high incidence and more than three years of low incidence. Due to a recent increase in diagnosed cases since late summer 2010, we conducted a survey of positive M. pneumoniae PCR tests performed by clinical microbiology departments in Denmark, which indicated that a new epidemic may be underway.
Notes
Erratum In: Euro Surveill. 2010 Nov 25;15(47)pii: 19725
PubMed ID
21087593 View in PubMed
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Mental disorders in childhood and young adulthood among children born to women with fertility problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274115
Source
Hum Reprod. 2015 Sep;30(9):2129-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
M F Svahn
M. Hargreave
T S S Nielsen
K J Plessen
S M Jensen
S K Kjaer
A. Jensen
Source
Hum Reprod. 2015 Sep;30(9):2129-37
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Is the risk of hospital admission or outpatient contact for mental disorders increased in children born to women with fertility problems compared with children born to women without fertility problems?
We found an increased risk of hospital admission or outpatient contact for mental disorders in children born to women with fertility problems.
Few studies have investigated the risk of mental disorders in children born after fertility treatment and although some studies have pointed to an increased risk, others found no association. The inconsistent results may be due to methodological constraints in many previous studies, including small sample size and short follow-up, resulting in imprecise risk estimates and lack of information on risk patterns of mental disorders in adulthood.
This nationwide retrospective register-based cohort study included all 2 412 721 children born in Denmark between 1969 and 2006. All children were followed from date of birth until date of hospital contact for a mental disorder, date of emigration, date of death or 31 December 2009, whichever occurred first.
Information concerning maternal fertility status for all children in the cohort was obtained by linkage to the Danish Infertility Cohort, which contains data on nearly all women with fertility problems in Denmark since 1963. A total of 124 269 (5%) children were born to women with fertility problems and 2 288 452 (95%) to women without fertility problems. To identify children hospitalized for a mental disorder, the cohort was linked to the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Registry. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between maternal fertility status and the risk of hospital admission or outpatient contact for various groups of mental disorders, including any mental disorder and all 11 main discharge diagnostic groups, classified according to the International Classification of Diseases, version 10.
During a mean follow-up period of 21 years (range, 0-40 years), 168 686 (7%) children were admitted to hospital or had an outpatient contact for a mental disorder. Children born to women with fertility problems had a significantly higher risk of any mental disorder (HR 1.23; 95% CI 1.20-1.26) and for most of the 11 main discharge groups, including schizophrenia (HR 1.16; 95% CI 1.07-1.27), mood (affective) disorders (HR 1.21; 95% CI 1.15-1.28) and disorders of psychological development (HR 1.15; 95% CI 1.09-1.21) as well as the subgroup of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders (HR 1.36; 95% CI 1.29-1.45) compared with children born to women without fertility problems. The risk estimates did not change markedly when analyses were performed separately for mental disorders diagnosed during childhood (0-19 years) and in young adulthood (20-40 years).
The true risk of mental disorders may be somewhat underestimated, as only severe disorders requiring hospital admission or outpatient contact were considered as events. Furthermore, we could not determine whether the increased risks observed were due to factors related to the underlying infertility or to fertility treatment procedures.
This is the first report on mental disorders in adulthood among children born to women with fertility problems. Furthermore, we have assessed the risk of several severe mental disorders not previously studied (e.g. neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders and disorders of adult personality and behaviour). These important findings should be investigated further in large epidemiological studies designed to differentiate between factors related to fertility treatment and to the underlying infertility.
The study was supported by internal funding from the Unit of Virus, Lifestyle and Genes at the Danish Cancer Society Research Center. All authors report no conflicts of interest.
PubMed ID
26202913 View in PubMed
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Postoperative mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196037
Source
BJU Int. 2001 Feb;87(3):183-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
S S Nielsen
A M Thulstrup
L. Lund
H. Vilstrup
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine V (Hepatology and Gastroenterology), Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
BJU Int. 2001 Feb;87(3):183-6
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - complications - mortality
Male
Odds Ratio
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Prostatic Hyperplasia - complications - surgery
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Transurethral Resection of Prostate - contraindications - mortality
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine the risk of 30-day postoperative mortality from transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in patients with liver cirrhosis, who are reportedly at considerably increased perioperative risk.
For the period 1 January 1977 to 31 December 1993, a population-based cohort was identified comprising Danish patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis and a random sample of Danes also undergoing TURP. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between liver cirrhosis, age, type of admission, comorbidity and 30-day mortality.
In a cohort of 23 133 patients with liver cirrhosis, 30 underwent TURP; 150 controls with no liver cirrhosis also underwent the same procedure. Of the patients with liver cirrhosis, 6.7% died within 30 days of TURP; the estimated adjusted odds ratio was 3.0 (95% confidence interval 0.4-22.9) for the 30-day postoperative mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis compared with patients without (mortality 2%). Advanced age, comorbidity and acute admission seemed to be associated with an increased postoperative mortality.
This study indicates that TURP in patients with liver cirrhosis was associated with increased mortality.
PubMed ID
11167639 View in PubMed
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Typing of Legionella isolates during an epidemiological investigation can be helpful but also misleading: an example from Greece.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167553
Source
Euro Surveill. 2006;11(8):E060824.4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006

8 records – page 1 of 1.