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Fibrosarcoma of bone. A demographic, clinical and histopathological study of all cases recorded in the Swedish cancer registry from 1958 to 1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27786
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1976 Nov;58-B(4):412-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1976
Author
S E Larsson
R. Lorentzon
L. Boquist
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1976 Nov;58-B(4):412-7
Date
Nov-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy, Needle
Bone Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Demography
Female
Fibrosarcoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Osteosarcoma - epidemiology - pathology
Prognosis
Registries
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The clinical records, radiographs and histopathological material of all forty-one patients recorded as suffering from fibrosarcoma of bone in the Swedish Cancer Registry for the years 1958 to 1968 have been analysed; in addition, four cases were found on histological review of a series of osteosarcomas. From this re-examination, twenty-four patients with genuine fibrosarcoma of bone were identified; twenty-two had primary neoplasms and two secondary. No sex or geographical differences were found. The tumours showed a prevalence for patients in the adult and older age groups. Half of the tumours arose from femoral or tibial metaphysial bone adjacent to a knee joint. All the tumours were of the medullary type. Almost one-third presented with a pathological fracture, and soft-tissue extension had occurred in all but three tumours. In contrast to previous reports, these tumours were more malignant than osteosarcomas and showed a five-year survival rate of only 4-2 per cent. In accessible sites, ablative surgery was used as the primary treatment, Fibrosarcoma of bone is a distinctive lesion and should be distinguished carefully from periosteal and soft-tissue fibrosarcomas because of differences in prognosis and treatment.
PubMed ID
1071089 View in PubMed
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Hand function and total locomotion status in rheumatoid arthritis. An epidemiologic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14502
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1990 Aug;61(4):339-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
B. Jonsson
S E Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1990 Aug;61(4):339-43
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Hand - physiopathology
Humans
Locomotion
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The effects of destructive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on hand function, as well as total locomotion status, were assessed in a Swedish population sample. In a community of 12,707 inhabitants, 82 were found with RA fulfilling ARA criteria 5-8, i.e., a prevalence of 0.7 percent. Seventy-seven of the 82 cases were evaluated with Sollerman's hand function test and our total locomotion score. The mean hand score (max. 80) was 61 (0-78), with no difference between the right and the left hand or between men and women. Hand function worsened with increasing age of the patient, as well as with increasing disease duration. It was highly correlated with the total locomotion status of the patient. A high correlation was found between hand function and hospital care. However, total medical or social costs for these patients were not related to hand function, but merely to the status of the lower extremities.
PubMed ID
2402987 View in PubMed
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The incidence of malignant primary bone tumours in relation to age, sex and site. A study of osteogenic sarcoma, chondrosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma diagnosed in Sweden from 1958 to 1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28083
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1974 Aug;56B(3):534-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1974

Joint disorders and walking disability in Sweden by the year 2000. Epidemiologic studies of a Swedish community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14488
Source
Acta Orthop Scand Suppl. 1991;241:6-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
S E Larsson
B. Jónsson
L. Palmefors
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Orthop Scand Suppl. 1991;241:6-9
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology
Female
Foot Diseases - epidemiology
Hip Joint
Humans
Joint Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Knee Joint
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Walking
Abstract
The prevalence of joint complaints with walking disability, as well as clinically diagnosed hip and knee diseases, in Sweden in the year 2000 was calculated from data from a population survey that we made in a Swedish community (Atvidaberg) in 1986. The population was representative of that of the whole country. Among all 5,259 persons aged 45 years and older, 35 percent reported long-lasting joint complaints. The prevalence of clinically diagnosed degenerative joint disease was 14 percent, that of extraarticular disease 12 percent, inflammatory joint disease 2.4 percent, arthralgia 1.4 percent, and collagenoses 0.5 percent. From the official estimations of the Swedish 8.5 million population as to age classes and sex by the year 2000, joint complaints can be foreseen in 1.2 million inhabitants, representing a total increase of 0.16 million persons. The number of patients with destructive rheumatoid arthritis can be estimated at 58,000 in the year 2000.
PubMed ID
2014745 View in PubMed
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Locomotion status and costs in destructive rheumatoid arthritis. A comprehensive study of 82 patients from a population of 13,000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14438
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1992 Apr;63(2):207-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
B. Jonsson
C. Rehnberg
L. Borgquist
S E Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, University of Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1992 Apr;63(2):207-12
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - economics - physiopathology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Disability Evaluation
Female
Health Expenditures
Humans
Locomotion
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Sweden
Abstract
Clinical manifestations (locomotion score) and annual costs were studied in a population-based cohort of 82 patients with rheumatoid arthritis fulfilling five to eight American Rheumatological Association's (ARA) criteria. The total costs were SEK 4.9 million: respectively 56 and 44 percent direct and indirect costs. The costs were correlated with total, as well as subjective and objective, locomotion scores, which assess separately impairment, disability, and handicap from the disease (WHO 1980). Patients below 65 years had higher costs-predominantly as an indirect cost due to loss of work-than older patients. Elderly rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients had a low score and high costs for medical and social services' care, but they had no indirect costs. Patients with a low locomotion score had received previous hospital treatment averaging 89 days. The need of hospital treatment was strongly correlated with low locomotion score. The mean annual patient's costs were about SEK 60,000, but above this for younger patients. When compared with patients with a mild affliction (score 91-100), patients with moderate manifestations, i.e., with a score of 70-90, had five times higher costs, whereas those with severe manifestations, with a score below 50, had 20 times higher costs.
PubMed ID
1590060 View in PubMed
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Osteosarcoma. A multifactorial clinical and histopathological study with special regard to therapy and survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27525
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1978 Dec;49(6):571-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1978
Author
S E Larsson
R. Lorentzon
H. Wedrén
L. Boquist
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1978 Dec;49(6):571-81
Date
Dec-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Bone Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - surgery
Bone and Bones - pathology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteosarcoma - mortality - pathology - surgery
Prognosis
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
A multifactorial analysis was performed on all 153 unequivocal cases of genuine osteosarcoma recorded in the Swedish Cancer Registry for the years 1958 through 1968. Cases of so-called parosteal osteosarcoma, soft-tissue osteosarcoma and osteosarcoma secondary to Paget's disease of bone were not included. The osteosarcomas were subclassified as follows: osteoblastic (69 per cent), chondroblastic (19 per cent) and fibroblastic (12 per cent). The overall 5-year survival rate was 22 per cent; 55 per cent for those who had undergone amputation above the joint proximal to the involved skeletal part, 22 per cent for those amputated on the involved skeletal part, 11 per cent for those treated with local extirpation of the tumor, and 1 per cent in cases in which the lesion was not radically removed. Tumors of the femur, humerus and scapula were as malignant as axial tumors. The former carried a 5-year survival rate of 13 per cent, regardless of whether the patients had been treated with exarticulation or amputation on the involved skeletal part. Patients with axial tumors showed a 5-year survival rate of 15 per cent. These survival data suggest that proximal amputation alone might suffice for lesions situated distally to the knee and elbow joints, while tumors in the humerus and femur should be treated with amputation combined with multicytostatic treatment or immunotherapy and axial tumors with local resection and multicytostatic or immunologic treatment.
PubMed ID
282771 View in PubMed
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Source
Int Orthop. 1981;5(4):305-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
S E Larsson
R. Lorentzon
H. Wedren
L. Boquist
Source
Int Orthop. 1981;5(4):305-10
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Bone Neoplasms - mortality - therapy
Child
Female
Femoral Neoplasms - mortality - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteosarcoma - mortality - therapy
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Tibia
Abstract
Multifactorial analysis of patients with osteosarcoma of the distal femur and proximal tibia, recorded in the Swedish Cancer Registry during 1958 through 1968, disclosed a 5-year survival of 15.1% for femoral osteosarcomas and 38.1% for tibial tumours. The prognosis was better in adults than in children and better in males than in females. Tumour size, soft tissue involvement, the presence of pathological fracture and the duration of symptoms before treatment influenced the prognosis. The best treatment for the tibial lesions was high amputation alone, whilst for the femoral tumours primary ablative surgery was not superior to combined high-dose radiotherapy and delayed amputation. The main cause for the higher survival rate for tibial neoplasms seemed to be the fact that they were less advanced on admission than those of the distal femur. The findings emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and treatment for improved survival.
PubMed ID
6951819 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.