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16 records – page 1 of 2.

[Ambulatory non-invasive 24-hour blood pressure measurement--do we need it?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225880
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 10;111(18):2280-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1991
Author
I. Os
I. Eide
S E Kjeldsen
A. Westheim
G. Nordby
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for nyresykdommer, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Aug 10;111(18):2280-2
Date
Aug-10-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care
Blood Pressure Monitors - utilization
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Humans
Norway
Abstract
The introduction of non-invasive, portable, automatic blood pressure measurement devices enables characterization of the blood pressure profile throughout the day in an ambulatory setting. The article advises against uncritical use. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurements have become a valuable tool in scientific research, however, especially in studies dealing with antihypertensive efficacy. In hypertensive patients with "white coat hypertension", important data cannot be obtained without the use of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring or blood pressure measurement at home.
PubMed ID
1896989 View in PubMed
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[An overview of hypertension studies with calcium antagonists]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47980
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 May 20;119(13):1878-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1999
Author
S E Kjeldsen
K. Midtbø
I. Os
A. Westheim
Author Affiliation
Hjerte- og nyremedisinske avdelinger, Medisinsk Klinikk, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 May 20;119(13):1878-82
Date
May-20-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trials
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
English Abstract
Europe
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Multicenter Studies
Prospective Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials
Abstract
Calcium antagonists are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. However, few endpoint studies with calcium antagonists have been done to prove reduction in hypertensive complications. Results of the STONE, SYST-EUR and SYST-CHINA studies show that long-acting calcium antagonists are effective compared to placebo, especially in patients with isolated systolic hypertension and diabetes. Ongoing prospective and randomized trials like STOP II, INSIGHT, NORDIL, ALLHAT and ASCOT will clarify whether calcium antagonists are more effective than well-proven diuretics and betablockers. ASCOT will test the hypothesis that amlodipine is more efficacious than atenolol in preventing cardiac complications in 18,000 hypertensive patients with high coronary risk including diabetes (among them, 2,000 in Norway). The study is also randomizing the patients in a factorial design to either atorvastatin or placebo, testing the so-called lipid hypothesis.
PubMed ID
10382332 View in PubMed
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Are left ventricular mass, geometry and function related to vascular changes and/or insulin resistance in long-standing hypertension? ICARUS: a LIFE substudy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53541
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2003 May;17(5):305-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
M H Olsen
E. Hjerkinn
K. Wachtell
A. Høieggen
J N Bella
S D Nesbitt
E. Fossum
S E Kjeldsen
S. Julius
H. Ibsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Glostrup University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. mho@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2003 May;17(5):305-11
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Flow Velocity - physiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood Pressure - physiology
Carotid Artery, Common - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Denmark
Diastole - physiology
Echocardiography
Female
Heart Ventricles - metabolism - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Humans
Hypertension - metabolism - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - metabolism - physiopathology
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Statistics
Stroke Volume - physiology
Systole - physiology
United States
Vascular Resistance - physiology
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Ventricular Remodeling - physiology
Abstract
Vascular hypertrophy and insulin resistance have been associated with abnormal left ventricular (LV) geometry in population studies. We wanted to investigate the influence of vascular hypertrophy and insulin resistance on LV hypertrophy and its function in patients with hypertension. In 89 patients with essential hypertension and electrocardiographic LV hypertrophy, we measured blood pressure; insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinaemic euglucaemic clamp; minimal forearm vascular resistance (MFVR) by plethysmography; intima-media cross-sectional area of the common carotid arteries (IMA) by ultrasound; and LV mass, relative wall thickness (RWT), systolic function and diastolic filling by echocardiography after two weeks of placebo treatment. LV mass index correlated to IMA/height (r=0.36, P=0.001), serum insulin (r=-0.25, P
Notes
Comment In: J Hum Hypertens. 2003 May;17(5):299-30412756401
PubMed ID
12756402 View in PubMed
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[Calcium antagonists in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. A comment to recently published results of clinical trials]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54691
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Jan 10;116(1):77-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1996
Author
S E Kjeldsen
A S Westheim
Author Affiliation
Hjertemedisinsk avdeling, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Jan 10;116(1):77-80
Date
Jan-10-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
China
Clinical Trials
Controlled Clinical Trials
English Abstract
Heart Failure, Congestive - drug therapy
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Multicenter Studies
Norway
United States
Abstract
Several studies have been published recently on the effect of calcium-antagonists in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. Except for an American case-control study, in which negative results may have been caused by selection bias, other studies show that calcium-antagonists have a positive effect. They appear to reduce cardiovascular complications, lower mortality and slow down the progression of atherosclerosis. However, large trials of adequate design and force are in progress (STOP II, NORDIL, HOT, INSIGHT, ALLHAT). It is hoped that the results of these trials will clarify whether calcium-antagonist are warranted in the treatment of hypertension and associated cardiovascular disease.
PubMed ID
8553344 View in PubMed
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[Can treatment of hypertension prevent myocardial infarction? New controlled clinical trials are proposed].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221640
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Feb 28;113(6):737-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-1993
Author
S E Kjeldsen
J O Syvertsen
P. Lund-Johansen
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk klinikk, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Feb 28;113(6):737-40
Date
Feb-28-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Clinical Trials as Topic
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - prevention & control
Scandinavia
Abstract
The only antihypertensive treatment regimen with documented effect on morbidity and mortality from stroke and coronary heart disease is based on diuretics and/or beta-blockers. However, new antihypertensive drugs are now widely used. These compounds may also prevent cardiovascular complications, but, as yet, this has not been proven. The clinical trials of the 1990s such as STOP II, CAPPP and NORDIL will test whether antihypertensive treatment with ACE-inhibitors and calcium-blockers are more effective than diuretics and beta-blockers in preventing cardiovascular complications. Also, a large-scale study (HOT) is being undertaken to examine how far diastolic blood pressure should be treated, and whether a small dose of aspirin has a protective effect when combined with good control of blood pressure. These studies will hopefully lead to better guidelines for the future treatment of hypertension.
PubMed ID
8096658 View in PubMed
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Clustering of coronary risk factors with increasing blood pressure at rest and during exercise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50045
Source
J Hypertens. 1998 Jan;16(1):19-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
R. Mundal
S E Kjeldsen
L. Sandvik
G. Erikssen
E. Thaulow
J. Erikssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Central Hospital of Akershus, Nordbyhagen, Norway.
Source
J Hypertens. 1998 Jan;16(1):19-22
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test
Humans
Hypertension - complications - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Physical Fitness
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Syndrome
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The metabolic cardiovascular syndrome is the label given to the clustering of unfavourable levels of a number of coronary risk factors in subjects with high resting blood pressures. We found recently that exercise blood pressure had a strong independent prognostic value. OBJECTIVE: To search for possible similar associations between exercise blood pressure levels and coronary risk factors by studying conventional and recently acknowledged coronary risk factors. METHODS: The study population comprised 1999 healthy men aged 40-59 years. Age-adjusted coronary risk factor levels and their relation to resting and exercise blood pressures were studied. Resting blood pressure was measured after subjects had rested supine for 5 min. The exercise blood pressure used was the systolic blood pressure measured with the subject sitting on a bicycle ergometer at the end of a work load of 600 kpm/min (100 W) for 6 min. RESULTS: Besides corroborating the relation between the metabolic syndrome and resting blood pressure levels, we observed similar or even stronger associations between levels of various coronary risk factors and exercise blood pressure. We found rather strong, direct associations between exercise blood pressure and total cholesterol level, fasting triglyceride level and body mass index whereas inverse relations were found for glucose tolerance, physical fitness, pulmonary functioning and the ability to increase heart rate during exercise. Virtually all these associations had a level of statistical significance of P
PubMed ID
9533412 View in PubMed
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Diabetes and CVD risk during angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker treatment in hypertension: a study of 15,990 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263820
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2014 Nov;28(11):663-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
L P Hasvold
J. Bodegård
M. Thuresson
J. Stålhammar
N. Hammar
J. Sundström
D. Russell
S E Kjeldsen
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2014 Nov;28(11):663-9
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - therapeutic use
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Benzimidazoles - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Enalapril - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tetrazoles - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Differences in clinical effectiveness between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in the primary treatment of hypertension are unknown. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients treated with ARBs or ACEis. Patients initiated on enalapril or candesartan treatment in 71 Swedish primary care centers between 1999 and 2007 were included. Medical records data were extracted and linked with nationwide hospital discharge and cause of death registers. The 11,725 patients initiated on enalapril and 4265 on candesartan had similar baseline characteristics. During a mean follow-up of 1.84 years, 36,482 patient-years, the risk of new diabetes onset was lower in the candesartan group (hazard ratio (HR) 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69-0.96, P=0.01) compared with the enalapril group. No difference between the groups was observed in CVD risk (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.87-1.13, P=0.86). More patients discontinued treatment in the enalapril group (38.1%) vs the candesartan group (27.2%). In a clinical setting, patients initiated on candesartan treatment had a lower risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes and lower rates of drug discontinuation compared with patients initiated on enalapril. No differences in CVD risk were observed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25211055 View in PubMed
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Insulin sensitivity is related to physical fitness and exercise blood pressure to structural vascular properties in young men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50002
Source
Hypertension. 1999 Mar;33(3):781-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
E. Fossum
A. Høieggen
A. Moan
M. Rostrup
S E Kjeldsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.eigil.fossum@ioks.uio.no
Source
Hypertension. 1999 Mar;33(3):781-6
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood pressure
Blood Vessels - physiology
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Exercise Test
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Male
Military Personnel
Physical Fitness
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Vascular Resistance
Abstract
Insulin resistance is related to physical inactivity, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death. Moreover, blood pressure responses during the first 6 minutes of an exercise test (600 kilo/pound/meter [kpm] per min) are more predictive for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than blood pressure at rest, which could reflect that exercise blood pressure correlates more closely to peripheral structural vascular changes than casual blood pressure. We have recently shown a correlation between insulin resistance and minimal forearm vascular resistance (MFVR) in young men recruited from the highest blood pressure percentiles during a military draft session. In the present study, we tested the hypotheses that insulin sensitivity relates to physical fitness and that blood pressure responses during an exercise test relate to peripheral structural vascular changes in these men; we also tested whether these findings were interrelated. We assessed insulin sensitivity and physical fitness in 27 young men randomly selected from the cohort having a blood pressure of 140/90 mm Hg or higher during the compulsory military draft session in Oslo. Insulin sensitivity correlated with physical fitness (r=0.58, P=0.002). Systolic blood pressure after 6 minutes of exercise (600 kpm/min) correlated with MFVR (r=0.46, P=0.015). MFVR and physical fitness independently explained 60% of the variation in insulin sensitivity, and MFVR independently explained 19% of the variation of systolic blood pressure after 6 minutes of exercise. In conclusion, insulin sensitivity is related to physical fitness and exercise blood pressure to structural vascular properties in these young men.
PubMed ID
10082487 View in PubMed
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[Is blood pressure therapy as effective in the general population as in controlled trials?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216880
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Nov 20;114(28):3359-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-1994
Author
S E Kjeldsen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Nov 20;114(28):3359-60
Date
Nov-20-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Trials as Topic
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Notes
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Oct 10;114(24):2835-97998029
PubMed ID
7809899 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.