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Change in psychotropic drug use in Norwegian nursing homes between 2004 and 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297761
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 03; 30(3):385-394
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
G Selbæk
S I M Janus
S Bergh
K Engedal
S Ruths
A S Helvik
J Šaltyte Benth
S U Zuidema
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Ageing and Health,Vestfold Hospital Trust,Tønsberg,Norway.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 03; 30(3):385-394
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Behavioral Symptoms - drug therapy - psychology
Cognition Disorders - drug therapy - psychology
Cohort Studies
Dementia - drug therapy - psychology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
ABSTRACTBackground:We aimed to assess whether there were any changes in the use of psychotropic drugs in Norwegian nursing homes between 2004 and 2011. Also, we investigated whether the predictors of use of specific psychotropic drug groups have changed.
We conducted a secondary analysis of two cohort studies of two Norwegian nursing home samples (2004/05 and 2010/11). Multivariate models were applied.
We found a significant decrease in the prescription of antipsychotic drugs between 2004 and 2011 (0.63 OR, 95%CI = 0.49-0.82, p
PubMed ID
28988552 View in PubMed
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The impact of dementia on the use of general practitioners among the elderly in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275243
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):199-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
A E Ydstebø
S. Bergh
G. Selbæk
J Šaltyte Benth
H. Lurås
C. Vossius
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):199-205
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - therapy
Female
General practice
General practitioners
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Home Care Services
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motivation
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
To assess the use of general practitioners (GPs), in elderly home-dwelling persons in Norway and explore the impact of cognitive decline, age, and living situation.
Prospective longitudinal study.
Data were collected from municipalities in four counties in Norway in the period from January 2009 to August 2012.
Home-dwelling persons 70 years of age or older, receiving in-home care.
Use of GPs over a period of 18 months related to cognitive state, functional status, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and demographics.
A total of 599 persons were included. The mean annual number of consultations per participant was 5.6 (SD = 5.4). People with moderate to severe dementia had fewer consultations per year compared with those with mild or no dementia (3.7 versus 5.8 per year, p = 0.004). In the multivariate model higher age predicted fewer consultations while affective neuropsychiatric symptoms were associated with an increase in frequency of consultations. The most frequent reason to consult a GP was cardiovascular diseases (36.8% of all consultations), followed by musculoskeletal complaints (12.1%) and psychiatric diagnoses (8.7%).
Our study shows that the home-dwelling elderly with moderate to severe dementia in Norway consult their GP less often than persons with mild or no dementia. This could indicate a need for better interaction between the municipal care and social services and the general practitioners.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26294095 View in PubMed
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