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[Admission pattern at a department of internal medicine. Factors of significance for readmission within three months after discharge]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72578
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Apr 13;160(16):2396-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-13-1998
Author
S B Christensen
T. Gjørup
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk afdeling, Sundby Hospital.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Apr 13;160(16):2396-400
Date
Apr-13-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Internal Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission
Patient Discharge
Patient Readmission
Registries
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate factors of significance for readmission of patients in a department of internal medicine. The study was based on hospital computerized data files. All admissions from the 1st of January to the 31st of December 1995 were included. During that period the department had 6061 admissions of 4152 patients. The readmission rate was 1.46. All patients were followed three months after discharge. Within that period 1119 (27%) of the patients were readmitted. A high frequency of readmission was especially found within the first ten days after discharge. Length of stay in hospital did not influence readmission rate. Women, patients in the age group 71-90 years and patients with chronic diseases were more likely to be readmitted. The demonstrated factors relating to a high readmission rate are difficult to influence. A prospective study including the primary health care system and a clinical evaluation of the patients is needed to examine causes of the high number of readmission within the first ten days after discharge.
PubMed ID
9571814 View in PubMed
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Axillary biopsy compared with dissection in the staging of lymph nodes in operable breast cancer. A randomised trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24113
Source
Eur J Surg. 1993 Mar;159(3):159-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
S B Christensen
C. Jansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oestersund Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Surg. 1993 Mar;159(3):159-62
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Axilla
Biopsy
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - surgery
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Lymph Node Excision
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Lymphatic Metastasis
Mastectomy
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging - methods
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare the accuracy of axillary dissection with that of axillary node biopsy for staging of lymph nodes in operable breast cancer. DESIGN: Randomised study. SETTING: District hospital, Oestersund, Sweden. SUBJECTS: 200 women with operable breast cancer who presented between 1985-87 and 1989-91. INTERVENTIONS: Women were randomised (n = 100 in each group) to have either axillary dissection (in which all fat tissue was removed from the axilla) or biopsy (in which the lower half of the axillary fat, together with obviously malignant nodes were removed for histopathological examination). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of nodes harvested by each method, and number that contained metastases. RESULTS: Nodes that contained metastases were found in 43 of the patients in the dissection group and 46 of those who had undergone biopsy alone. The median (range) yield of nodes in the dissection group was 8.5 (0-16) and in the biopsy group 6 (0-14), p
PubMed ID
8102890 View in PubMed
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A clinical epidemiologic study of thyroid carcinoma in Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26737
Source
Curr Probl Cancer. 1984 Aug;8(14):1-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1984
Author
S B Christensen
O. Ljungberg
S. Tibblin
Source
Curr Probl Cancer. 1984 Aug;8(14):1-49
Date
Aug-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Prognosis
Registries
Sex Factors
Sweden
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - pathology - surgery
Abstract
The annual incidence of clinically diagnosed TC in Malmö was, on an average, 2.4 per 100,000 population during the years 1960-1977. This was 1.2 per 100,000 population lower than the corresponding incidence in the whole of Sweden as reported by the National Cancer Registry. The main reason for the difference was suggested to be inclusion in the official figures of autopsy cases and of cases with a benign diagnosis, rather than a true difference in the prevalence of TC. During the later part of the study an increase in the incidence of differentiated TC of approximately 70% was noted. This was considered to be due to increased health awareness and the availability of medical care, because only the number of tumors with less advanced growth increased. The average annual mortality from TC in Malmö was 0.9 per 100,000, which was 0.4 per 100,000 lower than the corresponding official rate in all of Sweden. The difference was suggested to be mainly due to inclusion in the official figures of persons not dying of TC. The mortality did not change significantly during the period of investigation. The percentage distribution by histologic type of tumors clinically diagnosed (N = 104) was as follows: papillary cancer, 65%; follicular, 21%; medullary, 4%; and anaplastic, 12%. The prognosis as estimated by the life table method was worst for patients with anaplastic TC, followed by those with follicular, papillary, and medullary TC. The validity of using the relationship of the tumor to the thyroid capsule (i.e., intrathyroidal and extrathyroidal growth) as a basis for classification into tumor stages was supported in the present study: the mortality in patients with intrathyroidal tumors was lower than in those with extrathyroidal tumors. The definition of occult TC--TC not larger than 1.5 cm, without regard to the relation to the thyroid capsule--was considered inappropriate and a change in the conception of occult TC was proposed. The presence or absence of node metastases in TC did not seem to have major significance for the prognosis. The significance of age for survival was strongly supported in our study. Deaths from TC clinically diagnosed before the age of 60 were infrequent, whereas the disease after this age increasingly often was fatal. This was partly due to a late onset of anaplastic TC and partly to a higher mortality in older than in younger patients with papillary or follicular TC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
PubMed ID
6488867 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a hospital-based palliative support service with particular regard to financial outcome measures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21611
Source
Palliat Med. 1998 Jan;12(1):41-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
B. Axelsson
S B Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of General Surgery, Ostersund Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Palliat Med. 1998 Jan;12(1):41-9
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Resources - utilization
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based - economics - organization & administration
Hospital Costs
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - economics - therapy
Palliative Care - economics - organization & administration
Sweden
Terminal Care - economics - organization & administration
Abstract
The object of this study was a financial assessment of a hospital-based palliative support service, to be made by comparing the study group with a matched historical control group and a group of contemporary reference patients. The staff consisted of one full-time nurse supported by a surgeon one half-day per week. The patients in the study group utilized fewer institutional days than the control group, according to such parameters as duration of terminal hospitalization (P
PubMed ID
9616458 View in PubMed
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The incidence of recurrence and hypothyroidism following treatment with antithyroid drugs, surgery or radioiodine in all patients with thyrotoxicosis in Malmö during the period 1970-1974.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226477
Source
J Intern Med. 1991 May;229(5):435-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1991
Author
J. Berglund
S B Christensen
J F Dymling
B. Hallengren
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Lund University, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1991 May;229(5):435-42
Date
May-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antithyroid Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypothyroidism - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Iodine Radioisotopes - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Thyrotoxicosis - complications - therapy
Abstract
The incidence of recurrence and of hypothyroidism was determined in all new patients treated for thyrotoxicosis during the period 1970-1974 in an unselected, well-defined urban population. A total of 309 patients were followed up for a median time period of 108 (1-192) months. There was a cumulative incidence of 51% recurrence in patients who were treated with antithyroid drugs for Graves' thyrotoxicosis, whereas after surgery or radioiodine treatment there were few recurrences, but 32% and 78% cumulative incidences of hypothyroidism. There were no recurrences after surgery or radioiodine treatment in patients with toxic multinodular goitre or solitary toxic adenoma, but 29% and 40% cumulative incidences of hypothyroidism following radioiodine treatment. Late hypothyroidism occurred after surgery for Graves' thyrotoxicosis, and in all groups treated with radioiodine. Thus it is advisable that all patients with Graves' thyrotoxicosis, regardless of treatment, and all patients with toxic multinodular goitre or solitary toxic adenoma treated with radioiodine, should be followed up for many years, and probably for life.
PubMed ID
1710255 View in PubMed
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Indications for thyroxine therapy after surgery for nontoxic benign goitre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228931
Source
Acta Chir Scand. 1990 Jun-Jul;156(6-7):433-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Berglund
L. Bondesson
S B Christensen
A S Larsson
S. Tibblin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Lund, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Chir Scand. 1990 Jun-Jul;156(6-7):433-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Goiter, Nodular - drug therapy - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Hypothyroidism - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Care
Recurrence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thyroidectomy
Thyrotropin - blood
Thyroxine - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Abstract
Of 287 consecutive patients, surgically treated at our department for benign, nontoxic goitre during a six-year period, 261 could be followed up, on average, 8.0 years postoperatively. Unilateral surgical procedures had been used in 199 patients, subtotal thyroidectomy in 62. 29 patients were treated with thyroxine (T4) immediately postoperatively ("recurrence prophylaxis"); in the other patients thyroxine was only given in cases of hypothyroidism (significant increase of s-TSH). 26 patients had a goitre recurrence 0.5-10 years after surgery; of these 3 had got T4 as "recurrence prophylaxis" and 23 had not. There was no significant difference between patients with and without T4 postoperatively regarding the rate of recurrence. Of 55 patients treated with subtotal thyroidectomy, 33 had postoperative latent (n = 26) or manifest (n = 7) hypothyroidism. Only 13 of 177 patients operated on unilaterally developed hypothyroidism; two of these had Hashimoto's thyroiditis. All cases of hypothyreosis except 4 were detected within the first 12 months of follow-up. This study indicates that routine use of thyroxine as prophylaxis against recurrence after surgery for benign nontoxic goitre can be strongly questioned and that the risk of hypothyroidism is high after subtotal thyroidectomy.
PubMed ID
2368548 View in PubMed
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Medical care utilization by incurable cancer patients in a Swedish county.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22135
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 1997 Apr;23(2):145-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
B. Axelsson
S B Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of General Surgery, Ostersund Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 1997 Apr;23(2):145-50
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
Female
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - therapy
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, County
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - drug therapy - radiotherapy - surgery - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Palliative Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Residence Characteristics
Retrospective Studies
Surgery Department, Hospital - utilization
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminal Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Urologic Neoplasms - therapy
Abstract
A retrospective study of patients with cancer diagnoses treated at a Swedish county hospital was carried out in order to analyse medical care utilization by incurable cancer patients. All 208 patients customarily treated at the Department of General Surgery in Ostersund Hospital for cancer diagnoses during 1 year were included in the study. The main outcome measures were: number of institutional days; admissions; duration of terminal hospitalization. The Department of General Surgery supplied 7570 of all 12,276 (62%) institutional days needed throughout the disease course. The terminal hospitalization (i.e. the period of continuous institutional care ending with the death of the patient) constituted 39% of all institutional days. The duration of the terminal hospitalization seemed to be unrelated to various diagnoses and demographic variables. Patients with cancer of the breast utilized most institutional days/patient (median 80 institutional days) during the disease course. Married patients and patients living within a 40 km radius of the hospital spent significantly more days at the Department of General Surgery during the last 6 months of life than did the unmarried and those living further afield.
PubMed ID
9158190 View in PubMed
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Mortality from thyroid carcinoma in Malmö, Sweden 1960-1977. A clinical and pathologic study of 38 fatal cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26716
Source
Cancer. 1984 Oct 15;54(8):1629-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1984
Author
S B Christensen
O. Ljungberg
Source
Cancer. 1984 Oct 15;54(8):1629-34
Date
Oct-15-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Carcinoma - mortality
Carcinoma, Papillary - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Sweden
Thyroid Neoplasms - mortality - therapy
Abstract
Thirty-eight cases of fatal thyroid carcinoma (TC) occurred in a demographically well-defined area of, on an average, 243,000 inhabitants during an 18-year period, corresponding to an annual mortality rate of 0.9 per 100,000. The mortality rate did not change significantly during the period of investigation. All diagnoses were based on autopsy findings and were revised histologically. Ten cases were found to have papillary cancer, 10 follicular, 4 medullary, and 14 anaplastic. The survival time ranged between 0 and 27 years; two patients with medullary cancer died later than 10 years after diagnosis; none of the remaining patients died from the malignant disease later than 9 years after TC diagnosis. Nine of the anaplastic tumors contained elements of differentiated TC, and five patients who died from anaplastic cancer had had a history of goiter for more than 2 years. Insufficient surgical treatment (procedures less than lobectomy) was considered partially responsible for the fatal outcome in 3 of 14 surgically treated patients. Five deaths could be ascribed to complications to treatment. Two patients died postoperatively, two died from late effects of irradiation therapy, and one died in a coma caused by insufficient replacement therapy. The TC diagnosis was a postmortem surprise finding in ten cases.
PubMed ID
6478403 View in PubMed
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Natural history of thyroid carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26518
Source
Lancet. 1985 Dec 21-28;2(8469-70):1427-8
Publication Type
Article

No increase in fracture incidence in patients treated for thyrotoxicosis in Malmö during 1970-74. A 20-year population-based follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52560
Source
J Intern Med. 1999 Aug;246(2):139-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
B. Hallengren
B. Elmståhl
J. Berglund
S B Christensen
S. Elmståhl
O. Johnell
K G Thorngren
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1999 Aug;246(2):139-44
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - complications - etiology
Population Surveillance
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Thyrotoxicosis - complications
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To study whether there is an increased fracture incidence following thyrotoxicosis. DESIGN: A case-control study. SETTING: Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. SUBJECTS: All patients (n = 333) from the population of Malmö who were treated for thyrotoxicosis for the first time during the 5-year period 1970-74. A total of 618 controls were selected from the local municipality registry in Malmö. For each case the aim was to randomly select two age- and gender-specific controls, alive in 1993 and born the same year and month as the case. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Fracture incidence RESULTS: Comparing survivors, there were no differences in the percentage of individuals with fractures (all, fragility, non-fragility) between the patients and the controls. Comparing all individuals and including all fractures, the percentage of individuals with fractures in the entire female patient group (24.6%) was lower (P
PubMed ID
10447782 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.