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[Also in Ugeskrift 40 should the recommendations be well documented]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9065
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Nov 28;167(48):4580-1; author reply 4581
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-28-2005
Author
Søren Toubro
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Nov 28;167(48):4580-1; author reply 4581
Date
Nov-28-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Oct 3;167(40):3777-916221393
PubMed ID
16324451 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between APOE variants and metabolic traits and the impact of psychological stress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137422
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(1):e15745
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sofia I Iqbal Kring
John Barefoot
Beverly H Brummett
Stephen H Boyle
Ilene C Siegler
Søren Toubro
Torben Hansen
Arne Astrup
Oluf Pedersen
Redford B Williams
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen, Denmark. si@ipm.regionh.dk
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(1):e15745
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Blood glucose
Body Weights and Measures
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Genome-Wide Association Study - methods
Genotype
Humans
Insulin Resistance - genetics
Male
Metabolism - genetics
Middle Aged
Obesity - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - genetics
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
In a previous study, we observed that associations between APOE rs439401 and metabolic traits were moderated by chronic stress. Thus, in a population of stressed and non-stressed Danish men, we examined whether associations between APOE rs439401 and a panel of metabolic quantitative traits, all metabolic traits which may lead to T2D and CVD were moderated by psychological stress.
Obese young men (n = 475, BMI = 31.0 kg/m(2)) and a randomly selected control group (n = 709) identified from a population of 141,800 men were re-examined in two surveys (S-46: mean age 46, S-49: mean age 49 years) where anthropometric and biochemical measures were available. Psychological stress factors were assessed by a self-administered 7-item questionnaire. Each item had the possible response categories "yes" and "no" and assessed familial problems and conflicts. Summing positive responses constituted a stress item score, which was then dichotomized into stressed and non-stressed. Logistic regression analysis, applying a recessive genetic model, was used to assess odds ratios (OR) of the associations between APOE rs439401 genotypes and adverse levels of metabolic traits.
The APOE rs439401 TT-genotype associated positively with BMI (OR = 1.09 [1.01; 1.17]), waist circumference (OR = 1.09 [1.02; 1.17]) in stressed men at S-46. Positive associations were observed for fasting plasma glucose (OR = 1.42 [1.07; 1.87]), serum triglycerides (OR = 1.41 [1.05; 1.91]) and with fasting plasma insulin (OR = 1.48 [1.05; 2.08]) in stressed men at S-49. Rs439401 TT-genotype also associated positively with surrogate measures of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; OR = 1.21 [1.03; 1.41]) and inversely with insulin sensitivity (Stumvoll index; OR = 0.90 [0.82; 0.99], BIGTT-S(I); OR = 0.60 [0.43; 0.85]) in stressed men. No significant associations were observed in non-stressed men, albeit the estimates showed similar but weaker trends as in stressed men.
The present results suggest that the APOE rs439401 TT-genotype is associated with an adverse metabolic profile in a population of psychologically stressed Danish men.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21283811 View in PubMed
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Genotype-phenotype associations in obesity dependent on definition of the obesity phenotype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159553
Source
Obes Facts. 2008;1(3):138-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Sofia Inez Iqbal Kring
Lesli Hingstrup Larsen
Claus Holst
Søren Toubro
Torben Hansen
Arne Astrup
Oluf Pedersen
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Centre for Health and Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. SI@ipm.regionh.dk
Source
Obes Facts. 2008;1(3):138-45
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Association Studies
Humans
Ion Channels - genetics
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mitochondrial Proteins - genetics
Obesity - genetics - physiopathology
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear - genetics
Receptors, Somatostatin - genetics
Waist Circumference
Abstract
In previous studies of associations of variants in the genes UCP2, UCP3, PPARG2, CART, GRL, MC4R, MKKS, SHP, GHRL, and MCHR1 with obesity, we have used a case-control approach with cases defined by a threshold for BMI. In the present study, we assess the association of seven abdominal, peripheral, and overall obesity phenotypes, which were analyzed quantitatively, and thirteen candidate gene polymorphisms in these ten genes in the same cohort.
Obese Caucasian men (n = 234, BMI >or= 31.0 kg/m(2)) and a randomly sampled non-obese group (n = 323), originally identified at the draft board examinations, were re-examined at median ages of 47.0 or 49.0 years by anthropometry and DEXA scanning. Obesity phenotypes included BMI, fat body mass index, waist circumference, waist for given BMI, intra-abdominal adipose tissue, hip circumference and lower body fat mass (%). Using logistic regression models, we estimated the odds for defined genotypes (dominant or recessive genetic transmission) in relation to z-scores of the phenotypes.
The minor (rare) allele for SHP 512G>C (rs6659176) was associated with increased hip circumference. The minor allele for UCP2 Ins45bp was associated with increased BMI, increased abdominal obesity, and increased hip circumference. The minor allele for UCP2 -866G>A (rs6593669) was associated with borderline increased fat body mass index. The minor allele for MCHR1 100213G>A (rs133072) was associated with reduced abdominal obesity. None of the other genotype-phenotype combinations showed appreciable associations.
If replicated in independent studies with focus on the specific phenotypes, our explorative studies suggest significant associations between some candidate gene polymorphisms and distinct obesity phenotypes, predicting beneficial and detrimental effects, depending on compartments for body fat accumulation.
PubMed ID
20054173 View in PubMed
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[Guidelines for tracing and treatment of overweight].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144677
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Mar 22;172(12):948
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-22-2010
Author
Søren Toubro
Jens Fromholt Larsen
Author Affiliation
Reduce - Research Clinic of Nutrition, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark. st@reduce.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Mar 22;172(12):948
Date
Mar-22-2010
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Humans
Obesity - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Overweight - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
PubMed ID
20334782 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Guidelines for treatment of overweight/obesity, 2006].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171258
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Jan 9;168(2):180-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-2006
Author
Ole Lander Svendsen
Søren Toubro
Jens Meldgaard Bruun
Jens Peder Linnet
Jens Peter Kroustrup
Author Affiliation
H:S Bispebjerg Hospital, Endokrinologisk Sektion, Intern Medicinsk Klinik I, Den Kgl. Veterinaer, København NV. ols01@bbh.hosp.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Jan 9;168(2):180-2
Date
Jan-9-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Denmark
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Overweight
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Weight Loss
Abstract
Guidelines for evaluation and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults in Denmark are given. These guidelines are evidence-based and are similar to international guidelines.
PubMed ID
16403346 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mutation analysis of the preproghrelin gene: no association with obesity and type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47072
Source
Clin Biochem. 2005 May;38(5):420-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Lesli H Larsen
Anette P Gjesing
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Yasmin H Hamid
Søren M Echwald
Søren Toubro
Eva Black
Arne Astrup
Torben Hansen
Oluf Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center and Hagedorn Research Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark. LeiL@steno.dk
Source
Clin Biochem. 2005 May;38(5):420-4
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
DNA Mutational Analysis - methods
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motilin - genetics
Obesity - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the preproghrelin gene for variants and their association with obesity and type 2 diabetes. DESIGN AND METHOD: 82 obese probands were analyzed for mutations using single-strand conformational polymorphism, heteroduplex analyses and sequencing. Association studies were performed in 234 juvenile-onset obese and 323 lean men and in 557 type 2 diabetic and 233 glucose tolerant subjects. RESULTS: We identified two novel variants, 36C > T and IVS3 + 715delC, and 4 known variants, Arg51Gln, Leu72Met, Gln90Leu, and IVS1 + 169G > A. None of the variants showed any significant association with obesity or type 2 diabetes or estimates of glucose and lipid metabolism in glucose tolerant subjects. CONCLUSION: Variation in the preproghrelin gene is not associated with juvenile-onset obesity, type 2 diabetes or related phenotypes among the examined Danish Caucasian subjects.
PubMed ID
15820771 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Obesity: one of this century's greatest health challenge?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98048
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Feb 15;172(7):534-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2010
Author
Søren Toubro
Arne V Astrup
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Det Biomedicinske Fakultet, Institut for Human Ernaering, og Reduce - en forskningsklinik, og Gentofte Hospital, Klinisk Ernaeringsenhed, Denmark. st@reduce.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Feb 15;172(7):534-6
Date
Feb-15-2010
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Bariatric Surgery
Denmark - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Health Care Costs
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - mortality - prevention & control - therapy
Prevalence
Public Health
Weight Loss
World Health
Abstract
The prevalence of overweight and obesity exceed 50% in many European countries. Obesity is responsible for 2-8% of all health costs and 10-13% of all deaths in Europe. Only a fraction of patients obtain a medically relevant weight loss of 5-10% through lifestyle intervention. Surgery is limited to severe obesity and is very costly; therefore pharmaceuticals are a relevant alternative. Such treatment is hampered by the lack of official guidelines and a relatively limited effect compared to the expectations of patients as well as medical staff. Guidelines and official subsidies are debated.
PubMed ID
20156402 View in PubMed
Less detail

Past and current body size affect validity of reported energy intake among middle-aged Danish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147958
Source
J Nutr. 2009 Dec;139(12):2337-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Birgit M Nielsen
Marie M Nielsen
Søren Toubro
Oluf Pedersen
Arne Astrup
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Tine Jess
Berit L Heitmann
Author Affiliation
Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospitals, Centre for Health and Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. bn@ipm.regionh.dk
Source
J Nutr. 2009 Dec;139(12):2337-43
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Basal Metabolism
Body mass index
Body Size
Denmark
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Physical Examination
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Socioeconomic Factors
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
Our objectives were to estimate the degree of misreporting energy intake (EI) and analyze associations with previous BMI, current BMI, or both. The study was part of the Adiposity and Genetics Study follow-up study including 309 Danish men (age 40-65 y) originally sampled from the obligatory draft board examination. Height and weight were measured at the mean ages of 20 (draft board), 33, 44, and 49 y (current age). Obesity was categorized as BMI >or= 31 kg/m(2). Dietary intake for 7 d and physical activity (PA) level (PAL) were self-reported. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) was measured in a ventilated hood system. By comparing EI with energy expenditure and assuming energy balance, reporting accuracy (RA) was estimated as EI/(RMR.PAL). A plausibility interval was calculated to encompass specific variation components of EI, RMR, and PAL; the specific 95% plausibility interval was 1.00 +/- 0.35. Participants were categorized as underreporters (RA 1.35) of EI. The relation between RA and BMI was studied through linear regression analysis. Overall, the RA was (mean +/- SE) 0.76 +/- 0.01. Of 309 participants, 35% underreported and 7% overreported. Whether stratified for current BMI or draft board BMI, the obese men were more likely to underreport than those who were not obese. Among those currently not obese, underreporting was more prevalent among those who were obese at the draft board examination (44%) than among those who were not (21%). Regression analysis showed that both previous and current BMI and their combination were significantly associated with RA. Thus, underreporting of dietary intake seems to be associated with not only current BMI but also with current BMI in combination with previous BMI.
PubMed ID
19828683 View in PubMed
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Whole grain compared with refined wheat decreases the percentage of body fat following a 12-week, energy-restricted dietary intervention in postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126766
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Apr;142(4):710-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Mette Kristensen
Søren Toubro
Morten Georg Jensen
Alastair B Ross
Giancarlo Riboldi
Michela Petronio
Susanne Bügel
Inge Tetens
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. mekr@life.ku.dk.
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Apr;142(4):710-6
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Aged
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Defecation
Denmark
Diet, Reducing - adverse effects
Dietary Fiber - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Flour - analysis
Food Handling
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - diet therapy
Overweight - blood - diet therapy
Patient compliance
Postmenopause
Resorcinols - blood
Triticum - chemistry
Weight Loss
Abstract
Observational studies show inverse associations between intake of whole grain and adiposity and cardiovascular risk; however, only a few dietary intervention trials have investigated the effect of whole-grain consumption on health outcomes. We studied the effect of replacing refined wheat (RW) with whole-grain wheat (WW) for 12 wk on body weight and composition after a 2-wk run-in period of consumption of RW-containing food intake. In this open-label randomized trial, 79 overweight or obese postmenopausal women were randomized to an energy-restricted diet (deficit of ~1250 kJ/d) with RW or WW foods providing 2 MJ/d. Body weight and composition, blood pressure, and concentration of circulating risk markers were measured at wk 0, 6, and 12. Fecal output and energy excretion were assessed during run-in and wk 12. Plasma alkylresorcinol analysis indicated good compliance with the intervention diets. Body weight decreased significantly from baseline in both the RW (-2.7 ± 1.9 kg) and WW (-3.6 ± 3.2 kg) groups, but the decreases did not differ between the groups (P = 0.11). The reduction in body fat percentage was greater in the WW group (-3.0%) than in the RW group (-2.1%) (P = 0.04). Serum total and LDL cholesterol increased by ~5% (P
PubMed ID
22357746 View in PubMed
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Wholegrain vs. refined wheat bread and pasta. Effect on postprandial glycemia, appetite, and subsequent ad libitum energy intake in young healthy adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147909
Source
Appetite. 2010 Feb;54(1):163-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Mette Kristensen
Morten G Jensen
Giancarlo Riboldi
Michela Petronio
Susanne Bügel
Søren Toubro
Inge Tetens
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. mekr@life.ku.dk
Source
Appetite. 2010 Feb;54(1):163-9
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Appetite - drug effects - physiology
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Bread
Cereals
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Energy Intake - drug effects - physiology
Female
Glycemic Index
Humans
Male
Postprandial Period - drug effects - physiology
Reference Values
Satiety Response - drug effects
Triticum
Young Adult
Abstract
Wholegrain foods have received much attention in recent years, and have been proposed to play a role in energy regulation through lowering of postprandial glycemia and appetite. This randomized crossover single meal study in 16 young adults was conducted to test the effect of iso-caloric meals based on wholemeal wheat breads and pasta in comparison to similar refined wheat products on postprandial glycemia, appetite and ad libitum energy intake (EI). Test meals (50 g carbohydrates; 2MJ) consisted of refined wheat bread (RWB), wholegrain wheat bread (WWB), refined wheat pasta (RWP) and wholegrain wheat pasta (WWP) and were served after an overnight fast. Appetite ratings and blood glucose were assessed for 180 min after which an ad libitum lunch meal was served and EI measured. The 180 min glucose responses were similar for wholemeal and refined products, but pasta meals gave significantly lower glucose responses. Only RWP had a lower glycemic index compared to RWB. WWB, but not WWP, resulted in increased satiety and reduced hunger compared to RWB. Ad libitum EI did not differ. In conclusion, the results show that wholemeal breads increased satiety measures compared to their refined counterparts; however no significant effect on subsequent EI was observed.
PubMed ID
19837118 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.