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27 records – page 1 of 3.

The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for invasive pneumococcal disease in Alaska native children: results of a clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120452
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Mar;32(3):257-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013

2009 Pandemic influenza A H1N1 in Alaska: temporal and geographic characteristics of spread and increased risk of hospitalization among Alaska Native and Asian/Pacific Islander people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136553
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2011
Author
Jay D Wenger
Louisa J Castrodale
Dana L Bruden
James W Keck
Tammy Zulz
Michael G Bruce
Donna A Fearey
Joe McLaughlin
Debby Hurlburt
Kim Boyd Hummel
Sassa Kitka
Steve Bentley
Timothy K Thomas
Rosalyn Singleton
John T Redd
Larry Layne
James E Cheek
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jdw2@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Date
Jan-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Child
Child, Preschool
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Geography
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Population Groups
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Alaska Native people have suffered disproportionately from previous influenza pandemics. We evaluated 3 separate syndromic data sources to determine temporal and geographic patterns of spread of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (pH1N1) in Alaska, and reviewed records from persons hospitalized with pH1N1 disease in 3 areas in Alaska to characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of disease in Alaskans. A wave of pH1N1 disease swept through Alaska beginning in most areas in August or early September. In rural regions, where Alaska Native people comprise a substantial proportion of the population, disease occurred earlier than in other regions. Alaska Native people and Asian/Pacific Islanders (A/PI) were 2-4 times more likely to be hospitalized than whites. Alaska Native people and other minorities remain at high risk for early and substantial morbidity from pandemic influenza episodes. These findings should be integrated into plans for distribution and use of vaccine and antiviral agents.
PubMed ID
21342894 View in PubMed
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Alaska’s New Vaccine Assessment Law: Increased Access to Vaccines at a Cost-Savings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301029
Source
State of Alaska, Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health. Epidemiology bulletin no.14.
Publication Type
Report
Date
August 13, 2014
://www.epi.Alaska.gov 24 Hour Emergency (800) 478-0084 (Contributed by: Rosalyn Singleton, MD MPH, Gerri Yett, RN MSN CHES, Carmen Springer, MPH, Alaska Section of Epidemiology.) mailto:immune@alaska.gov http://www.epi.alaska.gov/ http://www.epi.alaska.gov/bulletins/docs/b2011_28.pdf http
  1 document  
Author
Rosalyn Singleton
Gerri Yett
Carmen Springer
Source
State of Alaska, Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health. Epidemiology bulletin no.14.
Date
August 13, 2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
82360
Keywords
Alaska
Vaccinations
Funding and costs
Documents
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Clinical course of chronic suppurative lung disease and bronchiectasis in Alaska Native children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295438
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2018 Oct 16; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-16-2018
Author
BreAnna Kinghorn
Rosalyn Singleton
Gabrielle B McCallum
Lisa Bulkow
Keith Grimwood
Leslie Hermann
Anne B Chang
Gregory Redding
Author Affiliation
University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2018 Oct 16; :
Date
Oct-16-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Alaska Native (AN) children from the Yukon Kuskokwim (YK) Delta region have high rates of chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD), including bronchiectasis. We characterized the clinical progress of an AN adolescent cohort with CSLD/bronchiectasis, and estimated bronchiectasis prevalence trends in this region.
The original cohort comprised 41 AN children (originally aged 0.5-8 years) with CSLD/bronchiectasis, recruited between 2005 and 2008, with follow-up in 2015-2016. Clinical assessments, lung function, radiography, medical chart review, and spirometry were obtained. We also conducted data queries of bronchiectasis diagnoses in YK individuals born between 1990 and 2010 to estimate prevalence.
Thirty-four (83%) of the original cohort aged 7.3-17.6 years were reviewed, of whom 14 (41%) had high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT)-confirmed bronchiectasis, eight (24%) had no evidence of bronchiectasis on HRCT scans, while 12 (35%) had not undergone HRCT scans. Annual lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) frequency decreased with age, although 27 (79%) still had respiratory symptoms, including all with HRCT-confirmed bronchiectasis, who were also more likely than those without confirmed bronchiectasis to have recent wheeze (80 vs 25%, P?=?0.005), auscultatory crackles (60 vs 0%, P?
PubMed ID
30325109 View in PubMed
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Comparison of nasopharyngeal flocked swabs and nasopharyngeal wash collection methods for respiratory virus detection in children using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284396
Source
Page 685 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):685
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Carolynn DeByle
Lisa Bulkow
Karen Miernyk
Lori Chikoyak
Kim Boyd Hummell
Thomas Hennessy
Rosalyn Singleton
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program/Centers for Disease Control, Anchorage, AK, USA
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA
Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation, Bethel, AK, USA
Source
Page 685 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):685
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Abstract
Nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) is easier to perform than nasopharyngeal wash (NPW); however, decreased sensitivity has limited the clinical use of NPS for detection of respiratory viruses.
Documents
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Declines in traditional marine food intake and vitamin D levels from the 1960s to present in young Alaska Native women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274769
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2016 Jul 28;:1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-28-2016
Author
Diane M O'Brien
Kenneth E Thummel
Lisa R Bulkow
Zhican Wang
Brittany Corbin
Joseph Klejka
Scarlett E Hopkins
Bert B Boyer
Thomas W Hennessy
Rosalyn Singleton
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2016 Jul 28;:1-8
Date
Jul-28-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To measure the trends in traditional marine food intake and serum vitamin D levels in Alaska Native women of childbearing age (20-29 years old) from the 1960s to the present.
We measured a biomarker of traditional food intake, the d15N value, and vitamin D level, as 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D3) concentration, in 100 serum samples from 20-29-year-old women archived in the Alaska Area Specimen Bank, selecting twenty-five per decade from the 1960s to the 1990s. We compared these with measurements of red-blood-cell d15N values and serum 25(OH)D3 concentrations from 20-29-year-old women from the same region collected during the 2000s and 2010s in a Center for Alaska Native Health Research study.
The Yukon Kuskokwim Delta region of south-west Alaska.
Alaska Native women (n 319) aged 20-29 years at the time of specimen collection.
Intake of traditional marine foods, as measured by serum d15N values, decreased significantly each decade from the 1960s through the 1990s, then remained constant from the 1990s through the present (F 5,306=77·4, P
PubMed ID
27465921 View in PubMed
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Early radiographic and clinical features associated with bronchiectasis in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6680
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2004 Apr;37(4):297-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Gregory Redding
Rosalyn Singleton
Toby Lewis
Patricia Martinez
Jay Butler
David Stamey
Lisa Bulkow
Helen Peters
James Gove
Barbara Morray
Carol Jones
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Pulmonary Division, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98105, USA. gredding@u.washington.edu
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2004 Apr;37(4):297-304
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alaska
Bronchiectasis - etiology - radiography
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Cough - complications
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Lung - pathology
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiratory Sounds
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - complications
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Bronchiectasis among children living in developing regions is associated with respiratory infections during early childhood, but specific risk factors that precede childhood bronchiectasis are not fully characterized. We hypothesized that severe respiratory syncytial viral (RSV) infection in infancy would increase the risk of bronchiectasis among Alaska Native children in rural Alaska. This was a follow-up cohort study of a 1993-1996 case-control study of RSV-hospitalized case patients and their controls. For each 5-8-year-old former case-patient and control subject, we reviewed medical records, interviewed parents, performed physical examinations and spirometry, collected sera, and analyzed all historical chest radiographs. Ten (11%) RSV cases and 10 (9%) controls had radiographic evidence of bronchiectasis. The mean age at radiographic diagnosis of bronchiectasis was 3.3 years (range, 1.2-6.1 years). Children were more likely to develop bronchiectasis if their chest radiographs, when they were 6 months' duration (RR = 3.0, P = 0.02), or infiltrates on multiple episodes (test for trend, P = 0.003). Radiographic features of hyperinflation and atelectasis among children
PubMed ID
15022125 View in PubMed
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Eighteen Years of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Surveillance: Changes in Seasonality and Hospitalization Rates in southwestern Alaska Native Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263672
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2015 Jun 10;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-2015
Author
Dana Jt Bruden
Rosalyn Singleton
Carolyn S Hawk
Lisa R Bulkow
Stephen Bentley
Larry J Anderson
Leslie Herrmann
Lori Chikoyak
Thomas W Hennessy
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2015 Jun 10;
Date
Jun-10-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Alaska Native (AN) infants from the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) experienced respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization rates five times higher and an RSV season twice as long as the general US infant population. We describe trends in hospitalization rates and seasonality during 18 years of continuous RSV surveillance in this population and explore contributions of climate and sociodemographic factors.
We abstracted clinical and RSV test information from computerized medical records at YKD Regional Hospital and Alaska Native Medical Center from 1994-2012 to determine hospitalization rates and RSV season timing. Descriptive village and weather data were acquired through the US Census and Alaska Climate Research Center, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, respectively.
During 1994-2012, YKD infant RSV hospitalization rates declined nearly 3-fold, from 177/1,000 infants/year to 65. RSV season onset shifted later, from mid-October to late December, contributing to a significantly decreased season duration, from 30 weeks to 11 weeks. In a multivariate analysis, children from villages with more crowded households and lacking plumbed water had higher rates of RSV hospitalizations (RR 1.17, p=0.0005, and RR 1.45, p=0.0003). No association of temperature or dew point was found with the timing or severity of RSV season.
Although the RSV hospitalization rate decreased 3-fold, YKD infants still experience a hospitalization rate 3-fold higher than the general US infant population. Overcrowding and lack of plumbed water were associated with RSV hospitalization. Dramatic changes occurred in RSV seasonality, not explained by changes in climate.
PubMed ID
26065863 View in PubMed
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The epidemiologic evidence underlying recommendations for use of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine among American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100913
Source
Vaccine. 2011 Jun 7;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-7-2011
Author
Maria Said
Katherine L O'Brien
J Pekka Nuorti
Rosalyn Singleton
Cynthia G Whitney
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 621N, Washington Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, United States.
Source
Vaccine. 2011 Jun 7;
Date
Jun-7-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Alaska Native and some American Indian (AI/AN) populations suffer disproportionately high rates of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in both the pediatric and adult populations compared to the general U.S. population. Two pneumococcal vaccines are currently available in the U.S.: a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23), available since 1983 and recommended for the elderly and those over 2 years of age with underlying medical conditions, and a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), used in the routine infant immunization schedule since 2010. The U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice (ACIP) previously recommended use of PPSV23 for persons living in special environments or social settings, including AN and certain AI persons 2-64 years of age, on the basis of higher disease rates. The recommendation for routine PPSV23 use among AI/AN persons
PubMed ID
21664217 View in PubMed
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Haemophilus disease in Alaskan and Canadian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98198
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2010 Feb;29(2):186; author reply 186-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010

27 records – page 1 of 3.