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Randomised controlled trial of the effect of long-term selenium supplementation on plasma cholesterol in an elderly Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270178
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Dec 14;114(11):1807-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-14-2015
Author
Frederik Cold
Kristian H Winther
Roberto Pastor-Barriuso
Margaret P Rayman
Eliseo Guallar
Mads Nybo
Bruce A Griffin
Saverio Stranges
Søren Cold
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Dec 14;114(11):1807-18
Date
Dec-14-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - blood - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Deficiency Diseases - blood - diet therapy - physiopathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Double-Blind Method
Elder Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Dropouts
Risk factors
Selenium - adverse effects - blood - deficiency - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Yeast, Dried - adverse effects - chemistry
Abstract
Although cross-sectional studies have shown a positive association between Se and cholesterol concentrations, a recent randomised controlled trial in 501 elderly UK individuals of relatively low-Se status found that Se supplementation for 6 months lowered total plasma cholesterol. The Danish PRECISE (PREvention of Cancer by Intervention with Selenium) pilot study (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01819649) was a 5-year randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial with four groups (allocation ratio 1:1:1:1). Men and women aged 60-74 years (n 491) were randomised to 100 (n 124), 200 (n 122) or 300 (n 119) µg Se-enriched yeast or matching placebo-yeast tablets (n 126) daily for 5 years. A total of 468 participants continued the study for 6 months and 361 participants, equally distributed across treatment groups, continued for 5 years. Plasma samples were analysed for total and HDL-cholesterol and for total Se concentrations at baseline, 6 months and 5 years. The effect of different doses of Se supplementation on plasma lipid and Se concentrations was estimated by using linear mixed models. Plasma Se concentration increased significantly and dose-dependently in the intervention groups after 6 months and 5 years. Total cholesterol decreased significantly both in the intervention groups and in the placebo group after 6 months and 5 years, with small and nonsignificant differences in changes in plasma concentration of total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol and total:HDL-cholesterol ratio between intervention and placebo groups. The effect of long-term supplementation with Se on plasma cholesterol concentrations or its sub-fractions did not differ significantly from placebo in this elderly population.
PubMed ID
26420334 View in PubMed
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Time trend and age-period-cohort effect on kidney cancer mortality in Europe, 1981-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76037
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006 May 3;6(1):119
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-3-2006
Author
Napoleon Perez-Farinos
Gonzalo Lopez-Abente
Roberto Pastor-Barriuso
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006 May 3;6(1):119
Date
May-3-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The incorporation of diagnostic and therapeutic improvements, as well as the different smoking patterns, may have had an influence on the observed variability in renal cancer mortality across Europe. This study examined time trends in kidney cancer mortality in fourteen European countries during the last two decades of the 20th century. METHODS: Kidney cancer deaths and population estimates for each country during the period 1981-2000 were drawn from the World Health Organization Mortality Database. Age- and period-adjusted mortality rates, as well as annual percentage changes in age-adjusted mortality rates, were calculated for each country and geographical region. Log-linear Poisson models were also fitted to study the effect of age, death period, and birth cohort on kidney cancer mortality rates within each country. RESULTS: For men, the overall standardized kidney cancer mortality rates in the eastern, western, and northern European countries were 20, 25, and 53% higher than those for the southern European countries, respectively. However, age-adjusted mortality rates showed a significant annual decrease of -0.7% in the north of Europe, a moderate rise of 0.7% in the west, and substantial increases of 1.4% in the south and 2.0% in the east. This trend was similar among women, but with lower mortality rates. Age-period-cohort models showed three different birth-cohort patterns for both men and women: a decrease in mortality trend for those generations born after 1920 in the Nordic countries, a similar but lagged decline for cohorts born after 1930 in western and southern European countries, and a continuous increase throughout all birth cohorts in eastern Europe. Similar but more heterogeneous regional patterns were observed for period effects. CONCLUSIONS: Kidney cancer mortality trends in Europe showed a clear north-south pattern, with high rates on a downward trend in the north, intermediate rates on a more marked rising trend in the east than in the west, and low rates on an upward trend in the south. The downward pattern observed for cohorts born after 1920-1930 in northern, western, and southern regions suggests more favourable trends in coming years, in contrast to the eastern countries where birth-cohort pattern remains upward.
PubMed ID
16672041 View in PubMed
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