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The dynamics of the tundra-taiga boundary: an overview and suggested coordinated and integrated approach to research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4340
Source
Ambio. 2002 Aug;Spec No 12:3-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Terry V Callaghan
Robert M M Crawford
Matti Eronen
Annika Hofgaard
Serge Payette
W Gareth Rees
Oddvar Skre
Bjartmar Sveinbjörnsson
Tatiana K Vlassova
Ben R Werkman
Source
Ambio. 2002 Aug;Spec No 12:3-5
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - trends
Ecosystem
Environmental health
Forecasting
Greenhouse Effect
Health Priorities
Humans
International Cooperation
Needs Assessment
Research - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Trees - physiology
Abstract
The tundra-taiga boundary stretches for more than 13,400 km around the Northern Hemisphere and is probably the Earth's greatest vegetation transition. The trees that define the boundary have been sensitive to climate changes in the past and models of future vegetation distribution suggest a rapid and dramatic invasion of the tundra by the taiga. Such changes would generate both positive and negative feedbacks to the climate system and the balance could result in a net warming effect. However, the boundary is becoming increasingly affected by human activities that remove trees and degrade forest-tundra into tundra-like areas. Because of the vastness and remoteness of the tundra-taiga boundary, and of methodological problems such as problematic definitions and lack of standardized methods to record the location and characteristics of the ecotone, a project group has been established under the auspices of the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC). This paper summarizes the initial output of the group and focuses on our uncertainties in understanding the current processes at the tundra-taiga boundary and the conflicts between model predictions of changes in the location of the boundary and contrasting recently observed changes due to human activities. Finally, we present recommendations for a coordinated international approach to the problem and invite the international community to join us in reducing the uncertainties about the dynamics of the ecotone and their consequences.
PubMed ID
12374056 View in PubMed
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The tundra-taiga interface and its dynamics: concepts and applications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4337
Source
Ambio. 2002 Aug;Spec No 12:6-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Terry V Callaghan
Ben R Werkman
Robert M M Crawford
Author Affiliation
Abisko Scientific Research Station, Box 62, SE-981 07 Abisko, Sweden. terry.callaghan@ans.kiruna.se
Source
Ambio. 2002 Aug;Spec No 12:6-14
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - trends
Ecosystem
Environmental health
Forecasting
Geographic Information Systems
Geography
Humans
Trees - physiology
Abstract
The tundra-taiga interface is a dominant vegetation boundary that is related to climate and has an importance at a global level for its contribution to land atmosphere interactions, biodiversity and land use. However, our understanding of the precise location, dynamics and characteristics of the boundary, and its environmental and biotic drivers at a circumpolar level is poor. Our understanding has been constrained for various reasons, perhaps including a quest by researchers to denote 2- or even 3-dimensional tree distribution limits to a single line on a map. Current rapid sociological and environmental changes in the north necessitate better definitions to be made of characteristics associated with the tundra-taiga interface so that changes can be monitored and identified, and implications of these changes can be assessed. This concept paper introduces some of the complexities of adequately defining the boundary and suggests characteristics and processes that could focus future research at a collaborative, circumpolar level to create baseline data and to monitor and predict changes in the boundary zone.
PubMed ID
12374061 View in PubMed
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