Skip header and navigation

Refine By

18 records – page 1 of 2.

[Acute otitis media is not treated according to recommendations. Survey of treatment patterns in emergency centers and community health centers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30054
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Oct 7;101(41):3142-3, 3146
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-7-2004
Author
Anna Lundborg Ander
Robert Eggertsen
Author Affiliation
Lindome vårdcentral.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Oct 7;101(41):3142-3, 3146
Date
Oct-7-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Community Health Centers
Comparative Study
Emergency medical services
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Otitis Media - drug therapy
Penicillin V - administration & dosage
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines
Prescriptions, Drug
Sweden
Abstract
Usual recommended treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) is antibiotics or expectancy. Different parts of Europe have varying therapy with Holland as an example of more restrictive use of antibiotics. The purpose with this study was to see differences in treatment length, choice of antibiotics, and differences in handling on daytime and emergency hours. 432 case records of children, aged up to ten years were retrospectively investigated. The result shows that antibiotics were prescribed to all except five patients. First choice of antibiotic (70 per cent) was penicillin V that also was more used at emergency hours than daytime at the health centre. Treatment time varied from five to ten days in contrast to national recommendations of five-day therapy. Registrars preferred five-day therapy and specialists seven days. We conclude that penicillin V is first choice of treatment in AOM, that treatment time varies from five to ten days without any underlying reasons and that expectancy was used only in very few cases.
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2004 Nov 18;101(47):3824, 382715609540
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2004 Oct 28;101(44):3461; author reply 346115560664
PubMed ID
15517708 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A study of 56-65 years old persons in Mölnlycke. No association between Helicobacter and heart disease or thyroid disorder]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53781
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Feb 7;99(6):508-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-2002

Bone mineral density in primary care patients related to serum calcium concentrations: a longitudinal cohort study from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294991
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2018 Jun; 36(2):198-206
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Sofia Dalemo
Robert Eggertsen
Per Hjerpe
Erik G Almqvist
Kristina Bengtsson Boström
Author Affiliation
a Institute of Medicine/Dept. of Public Health and Community/Primary Health Care , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Gothenburg , Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2018 Jun; 36(2):198-206
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Bone Density
Calcium - blood
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Hypercalcemia - blood - complications - metabolism
Hyperparathyroidism, Primary - blood - metabolism
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - blood - etiology - metabolism
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Parathyroidectomy
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Elevated calcium concentration is a commonly used measure in screening analyses for primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) and cancer. Low bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis are common features of pHPT and strengthen the indication for parathyroidectomy. It is not known whether an elevated calcium concentration could be a marker of low BMD in suspected pHPT patients with a normal parathyroid hormone concentration.
To study if low BMD and osteoporosis are more common after ten years in patients with elevated compared with normal calcium concentrations at baseline.
Prospective case control study.
Primary care, southern Sweden.
One hundred twenty-seven patients (28 men) with baseline elevated, and 254 patients (56 men) with baseline normal calcium concentrations, mean age 61 years, were recruited. After ten years, 77% of those still alive (74 with elevated and 154 with normal calcium concentrations at baseline) participated in a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry measurement for BMD assessment and analysis of calcium and parathyroid hormone concentrations.
Association between elevated and normal calcium concentration at base-line and BMD at follow-up. Correlation between calcium and parathyroid hormone concentrations and BMD at follow-up.
A larger proportion of the patients with elevated baseline calcium concentrations who participated in the follow-up had osteoporosis (p value?=?0.036), compared with the patients with normal concentrations. In contrast, no correlation was found between calcium or parathyroid hormone concentrations and BMD at follow-up.
In this study, patients with elevated calcium concentrations at baseline had osteoporosis ten years later more often than controls (45% vs. 29%), which highlights the importance of examining these patients further using absorptiometry, even when their parathyroid hormone level is normal. Key Points Osteoporosis is common, difficult to detect and usually untreated. It is not known whether elevated calcium concentrations, irrespective of the PTH level, could be a marker of low bone mineral density. No correlation was found between calcium or parathyroid hormone concentrations and bone mineral density at follow-up. In this study, patients with elevated calcium concentrations at baseline had osteoporosis ten years later more often than controls (45% vs. 29%).
Notes
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2014 Oct;25(10):2359-81 PMID 25182228
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2016 Jun;34(2):165-71 PMID 27049170
Cites: Clin Biochem. 2012 Aug;45(12):954-63 PMID 22569596
Cites: J Intern Med. 2006 Feb;259(2):191-8 PMID 16420548
Cites: Eur J Rheumatol. 2017 Mar;4(1):46-56 PMID 28293453
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Apr;95(4):1653-62 PMID 20130069
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2014 May 05;15:84 PMID 24886507
Cites: Arch Osteoporos. 2013;8:137 PMID 24113838
Cites: Surgery. 2004 Dec;136(6):1281-8 PMID 15657588
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 1997 Nov;12(11):1761-8 PMID 9383679
Cites: Bone. 1998 May;22(5):565-70 PMID 9600793
Cites: Clin Biochem. 2011 Jul;44(10-11):849-52 PMID 21515248
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 1999 Oct;14(10):1700-7 PMID 10491217
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Oct;99(10):3595-606 PMID 25162669
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2007 Oct;18(10):1319-28 PMID 17566815
Cites: Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;25(4):197-211 PMID 24418120
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Oct;99(10):3561-9 PMID 25162665
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1992 Sep;10(3):192-7 PMID 1410949
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Dec;31(4):248-54 PMID 24299047
Cites: Leg Med (Tokyo). 2016 May;20:18-22 PMID 27161916
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2010 May 30;11:43 PMID 20509973
Cites: Oncologist. 2014 Sep;19(9):919-29 PMID 25063228
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2004 Jun;22(2):78-82 PMID 15255485
Cites: Bone. 2017 Nov;104:54-65 PMID 28285014
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Sep;24(3):160-5 PMID 16923625
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2016 Jun;34(2):196-204 PMID 27189389
Cites: Ther Adv Musculoskelet Dis. 2014 Oct;6(5):185-202 PMID 25342997
PubMed ID
29623754 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) be used as a screening tool in general practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53277
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2004 Sep;22(3):187-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Maria Schaufelberger
Claes-Håkan Bergh
Kenneth Caidahl
Robert Eggertsen
Eva Furenäs
Göran Lindstedt
Thomas Nilsson
Kari Stefferud
Karl Swedberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Mölnlycke Primary Health Care and Research Centre, Mölnlycke, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2004 Sep;22(3):187-90
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood - diagnostic use
Biological Markers - blood
Family Practice - methods
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood - diagnostic use
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:To investigate plasma brain natriuretic peptide (p-BNP) in consecutive primary care patients for heart failure screening. DESIGN: Open, descriptive. SETTING: Three primary care clinics, university hospital. SUBJECTS: 291 consecutive patients, > or =40 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: p-BNP and general practitioners estimated probability of CHF. RESULTS: Median p-BNP was 29 ng/L. In 42% p-BNP was >40 ng/L in the first sample. In 41 patients further investigated, median p-BNP was 98 ng/L, with a correlation between p-BNP and physicians' estimation of probability of heart failure (r=0.469, p
PubMed ID
15370797 View in PubMed
Less detail

Correlations of water iodine concentration to earlier goitre frequency in Sweden-an iodine sufficient country with long-term iodination of table salt.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307828
Source
Environ Health Prev Med. 2019 Dec 07; 24(1):73
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Dec-07-2019
Author
Sofia Manousou
Maja Stål
Robert Eggertsen
Michael Hoppe
Lena Hulthén
Helena Filipsson Nyström
Author Affiliation
Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Environ Health Prev Med. 2019 Dec 07; 24(1):73
Date
Dec-07-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Drinking Water - chemistry
Female
Food, Fortified - analysis
Goiter - epidemiology - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Iodine - analysis - urine
Male
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Thyroid Gland - anatomy & histology
Abstract
Before iodination of Swedish table salt in 1936, iodine deficiency resulting in goitre and hypothyroidism was common. Sweden has become iodine sufficient, as shown in a national survey in 2007, proving its iodination fortification programme effective for the general population. The objective of this study was to collect drinking water from water treatment plants nationally and test if water iodine concentration (WIC) correlated to urinary iodine concentration (UIC) of school-aged children in a national survey 2007 to former goitre frequency in 1929 and to thyroid volume data in 2007.
In 2012, 166 treatment plants, located in 57% (166 of 290) of all Swedish municipalities, were asked to collect drinking water samples of approximately 10 ml. In 2007, tap water samples of the same volume were collected from 30 randomly selected schools for the national survey. Analysis of WIC was done in both treatment plants in 2012 (n = 166) and tap water in 2007 (n = 30). The correlation of WIC to the children's UIC and thyroid volume after iodination was tested based on data from the national survey in 2007. The association of WIC to former goitre frequency was tested based on pre-iodination data, derived from a map of goitre frequency drawn in 1929.
The median WIC from water treatment plants was 4.0 µg/L (range 0-27 µg/L). WIC was similar in coastal and inland areas, for both ground and surface water. WIC correlated with historical goitre areas and was lower in the goitre areas than in non-goitre areas (p
PubMed ID
31810448 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of a tailored, multi-component intervention for implementation of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in primary care physical therapy: a non-randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258964
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2014;14:105
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Susanne Bernhardsson
Maria E H Larsson
Robert Eggertsen
Monika Fagevik Olsén
Kajsa Johansson
Per Nilsen
Lena Nordeman
Maurits van Tulder
Birgitta Öberg
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2014;14:105
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - therapy
Physical Therapy Modalities - standards - statistics & numerical data
Physical Therapy Specialty - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Health Care - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Clinical practice guidelines are important for transmitting research findings into practice and facilitating the application of evidence-based practice (EBP). There is a paucity of knowledge about the impact of guideline implementation strategies in primary care physical therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a guideline implementation intervention in primary care physical therapy in western Sweden.
An implementation strategy based on theory and current evidence was developed. A tailored, multi-component implementation intervention, addressing earlier identified determinants, was carried out in three areas comprising 28 physical therapy practices including 277 physical therapists (PTs) (intervention group). In two adjacent areas, 171 PTs at 32 practices received no intervention (control group). The core component of the intervention was an implementation seminar with group discussions. Among other components were a website and email reminders. Data were collected at baseline and follow-up with a web-based questionnaire. Primary outcomes were the self-reported awareness of, knowledge of, access to, and use of guidelines. Secondary outcomes were self-reported attitudes toward EBP and guidelines. Analyses were performed using Pearson's ?2 test and approximative z-test.
168 PTs (60.6%) in the intervention group and 88 PTs (51.5%) in the control group responded to the follow-up questionnaire. 186/277 PTs (67.1%) participated in the implementation seminars, of which 97 (52.2%) responded. The proportions of PTs reporting awareness of (absolute difference in change 20.6%, p?=?0.023), knowledge where to find (20.4%, p?=?0.007), access to (21.7%, p?
Notes
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2010 Apr 15;35(8):858-6620308941
Cites: Med Care. 1994 Mar;32(3):202-138145598
Cites: Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2010 Jun 1;7(2):57-820492634
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2011 Jan;64(1):32-4021130349
Cites: Aust J Physiother. 2006;52(3):165-7416942451
Cites: Milbank Q. 2007;85(1):93-13817319808
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2007 Apr;13(2):161-817378860
Cites: Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2007 Jan;(149):1-6917764217
Cites: Med Care. 2007 Oct;45(10):973-8017890995
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Apr 26;336(7650):924-618436948
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2008 Aug;17(4):296-30018678729
Cites: Phys Ther. 2008 Sep;88(9):1068-7718635670
Cites: BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2008;8:3818789150
Cites: Phys Ther. 2008 Oct;88(10):1109-2118703675
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2008 Oct;14(5):888-9719018923
Cites: Aust J Physiother. 2008;54(4):233-4119025503
Cites: Psychol Health Med. 2009 Jan;14(1):1-819085307
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2009 Feb;62(2):167-176.e118786808
Cites: Man Ther. 2009 Apr;14(2):189-9618375174
Cites: Musculoskeletal Care. 2009 Mar;7(1):45-5618972322
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(2):CD00303019370580
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2009 Nov;41(13):1024-3219893996
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(3):CD00547020238340
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Dec 14;182(18):E839-4220603348
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2011 Apr;23(2):198-20921242158
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Oct 20;282(15):1458-6510535437
Cites: Fam Pract. 2000 Feb;17 Suppl 1:S11-610735262
Cites: Med Care. 2001 Aug;39(8 Suppl 2):II2-4511583120
Cites: Med Care. 2001 Aug;39(8 Suppl 2):II46-5411583121
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Nov 28;286(20):2578-8511722272
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2002 Jul;55(7):717-2212160920
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2003 Feb 4;3(1):312622873
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2003;(2):CD00425812804509
Cites: Phys Ther. 2003 Sep;83(9):786-80512940766
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Oct 11;362(9391):1225-3014568747
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2011 Fall;31(4):276-8222189992
Cites: Implement Sci. 2012;7:5322682656
Cites: Implement Sci. 2012;7:5022651257
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;10:CD00439823076904
Cites: Syst Rev. 2012;1:3622898173
Cites: Implement Sci. 2012;7:7022831550
Cites: Med Care Res Rev. 2013 Feb;70(1):29-4522930312
Cites: Phys Ther. 2013 Jun;93(6):819-3223431214
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2013 Aug;46(1):81-9523512568
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2013 Aug;35(18):1571-723339718
Cites: Phys Ther. 2014 Mar;94(3):343-5424179140
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Jan 13;312(7023):71-28555924
Cites: Med Care. 1996 Sep;34(9):873-898792778
Cites: Physiother Res Int. 1997;2(1):17-299238748
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2005 Jan 1;30(1):146-5115626995
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2005 Feb;58(2):107-1215680740
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2005 Feb;58(2):113-6; discussion 117-2015680741
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2005 Feb;14(1):26-3315692000
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2005 Apr;14(2):107-1215805455
Cites: Phys Ther. 2005 Nov;85(11):1151-6716253045
Cites: Physiother Res Int. 2006 Jun;11(2):93-10316808090
Cites: Health Technol Assess. 2004 Feb;8(6):iii-iv, 1-7214960256
Cites: Phys Ther. 2010 Jun;90(6):953-6120413576
PubMed ID
24589291 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inadequate iodine intake in lactating women in Sweden: A pilot 1-year, prospective, observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304825
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2021 01; 100(1):48-57
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2021
Author
Sofia Manousou
Hanna Augustin
Robert Eggertsen
Lena Hulthén
Helena Filipsson Nyström
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2021 01; 100(1):48-57
Date
01-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Iodine - deficiency
Lactation
Milk, human - chemistry
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
Breastfed infants depend on breast-milk iodine for growth and brain development, as iodine is a trace element important for thyroid hormone production. Iodine need is higher during lactation; hence, mothers and children are at risk of iodine deficiency. We aimed to explore maternal iodine and thyroidal status during lactation.
Pregnant women were recruited in Gothenburg, southwest Sweden. Maternal urine and serum were collected at pregnancy week 35-37 (n = 84) and 0.5, 4, and 12 months postpartum. Seventy mothers provided breast milk at 0.5 months.
Median (interquartile range) breast-milk iodine concentration was 90 (66-116) µg/L. About 58% had breast-milk iodine concentration
PubMed ID
32880886 View in PubMed
Less detail

Iodine Status After Bariatric Surgery-a Prospective 10-Year Report from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295916
Source
Obes Surg. 2018 02; 28(2):349-357
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Sofia Manousou
Lena M S Carlsson
Robert Eggertsen
Lena Hulthén
Peter Jacobson
Kerstin Landin-Wilhelmsen
Penelope Trimpou
Per-Arne Svensson
Helena Filipsson Nyström
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine at Kungälvs Hospital, Kungälv, Sweden. sofia.manousou@vgregion.se.
Source
Obes Surg. 2018 02; 28(2):349-357
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastric Bypass - adverse effects
Gastroplasty - adverse effects
Humans
Iodine - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid - blood - epidemiology - surgery
Postoperative Period
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Bariatric surgery can lead to nutrient deficiencies. Gastric by-pass (GBP) entails restriction and malabsorption, whereas, vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) is only restrictive.
The objective of this study is to study whether GBP-patients develop iodine deficiency from malabsorption, and if GBP- and VBG-patients develop lower 24-h urinary iodine excretion (24-UIE) than obese non-operated controls (OB-controls) due to lower iodine intake.
The Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study is a prospective, non-randomized study of 4047 obese patients included 1987-2001, who chose bariatric surgery or non-surgical treatment. SOS-groups were compared at baseline, after 2 and 10 years and with population-based subsamples (MONICA-controls).
One hundred eighty-eight GBP-patients were matched with 188 VBG-patients and 188 OB-controls and with three subgroups from 412 MONICA-controls.
Primary outcome was 24-UIE. Secondary outcomes were iodine intake, iodine supplementation, TSH, FT4, and thyroid morbidity.
At baseline, median 24-UIE was higher in GBP-patients, VBG-patients and OB-controls than in MONICA-controls (214, 201, 203 and 137 µg/day, p 
Notes
Cites: J Nutr. 2012 Apr;142(4):744-50 PMID 22378324
Cites: Clin Chem. 1996 Feb;42(2):239-43 PMID 8595717
Cites: Nutrients. 2013 May 15;5(5):1595-608 PMID 23676549
Cites: J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2010 Jun 10;7:24 PMID 20537171
Cites: Metabolism. 1964 Sep;13:843-6 PMID 14231285
Cites: Diabetes Metab. 2009 Dec;35(6 Pt 2):544-57 PMID 20152742
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Dec 23;351(26):2683-93 PMID 15616203
Cites: Am J Surg. 2002 Dec;184(6B):9S-16S PMID 12527344
Cites: J Nutr. 2003 Mar;133 Suppl 3:895S-920S PMID 12612176
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2012 May;166(5):887-95 PMID 22307572
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2006 Jan;154(1):21-8 PMID 16381987
Cites: Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2008 Sep-Oct;4(5 Suppl):S73-108 PMID 18490202
Cites: Obes Surg. 2005 Feb;15(2):145-54 PMID 15802055
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Feb;24(1):13-27 PMID 20172467
Cites: Obes Surg. 2014 Nov;24(11):1921-5 PMID 24740595
Cites: Obes Surg. 2015 Jan;25(1):85-9 PMID 24908244
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 1989;9:21-38 PMID 2669871
Cites: Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2006 Mar;231(3):277-81 PMID 16514173
Cites: Food Nutr Res. 2016 Jun 08;60:31969 PMID 27283870
Cites: J Endocrinol Invest. 2003;26(9 Suppl):1-62 PMID 15008143
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2006 Aug;155(2):219-28 PMID 16868134
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2008 Apr;99(4):813-8 PMID 17961291
Cites: J Am Coll Surg. 2011 Aug;213(2):261-6 PMID 21624841
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2011 May;164(5):801-9 PMID 21357288
Cites: Obes Surg. 2009 Mar;19(3):274-80 PMID 19034589
PubMed ID
28766267 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-term follow-up of patients with elevated serum calcium concentrations in Swedish primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105871
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Dec;31(4):248-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Sofia Dalemo
Robert Eggertsen
Per Hjerpe
Svante Jansson
Erik G Almqvist
Kristina Bengtsson Boström
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community, Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Gothenburg , Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Dec;31(4):248-54
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Calcium - blood
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypercalcemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Hyperparathyroidism, Primary - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To follow up patients with elevated calcium concentrations after 10 years.
Longitudinal, using medical records, questionnaires, and clinical investigation.
Primary care in Tibro, Sweden, 2008-2010.
127 patents with elevated calcium concentrations and 254 patients with normal calcium concentrations from the local community, attending the health care centre.
Diagnoses and mortality in patients with elevated calcium concentrations in 1995-2000, compared with patients with normal calcium concentrations and the background population.
The proportion of patients for whom no underlying cause was detected decreased from 55% at baseline to 12% at follow-up. Primary hyperparathyroidism was most common in women, 23% at baseline and 36% at follow-up, and the cancer prevalence increased from 5% to 12% in patients with elevated calcium concentration. Mortality tended to be higher in men with elevated calcium concentrations compared with men with normal calcium concentrations, and was significantly higher than in the background population (SMR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-3.8). Cancer mortality was significantly increased in men (p = 0.039). Low calcium concentrations were also associated with higher mortality (p = 0.004), compared with patients with normal calcium concentrations.
This study underscores the importance of investigating patients with increased calcium concentrations suggesting that most of these patients--88% in our study--will turn out to have an underlying disease associated with hypercalcaemia during a 10-year follow-up period. Elevated calcium concentrations had a different disease pattern in men and women, with men showing increased cancer mortality in this study.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2004;64(4):271-8415223694
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Dec 22;365(25):2389-9722187986
Cites: Lancet. 1987 Jan 10;1(8524):59-622879173
Cites: IARC Sci Publ. 1987;(82):1-4063329634
Cites: Ann Surg. 1990 Oct;212(4):543-9; discussion 549-502222019
Cites: World J Surg. 1991 May-Jun;15(3):399-405; discussion 406-71853620
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1992 Sep;10(3):192-71410949
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1995 Mar;13(1):46-517777735
Cites: Am J Med. 1995 Nov;99(5):577-87485219
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1996 Jun;81(6):2149-538964843
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1997 Aug;50(8):967-739291883
Cites: Hypertension. 1999 Sep;34(3):484-9010489398
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Sep;24(3):160-516923625
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2010 Mar;28(1):18-2320121652
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2010;11:4320509973
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2011 Feb;39(2):314-2121099425
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2011 Sep;29(3):171-521740334
Cites: Kobe J Med Sci. 1984 Apr;30(1-2):1-66748562
PubMed ID
24299047 View in PubMed
Less detail

More cost-effective management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders in primary care after direct triaging to physiotherapists for initial assessment compared to initial general practitioner assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302966
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 May 01; 20(1):186
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
May-01-2019
Author
Lena Bornhöft
Jörgen Thorn
Mikael Svensson
Lena Nordeman
Robert Eggertsen
Maria E H Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. lena.bornhoft@vgregion.se.
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 May 01; 20(1):186
Date
May-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cost-Benefit Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Critical Pathways - economics - organization & administration
Female
Follow-Up Studies
General Practitioners - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Nurses - economics - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Physical Therapists - economics - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - economics - organization & administration
Quality of Life
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Triage - economics - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
A model for triaging patients in primary care to provide immediate contact with the most appropriate profession to treat the condition in question has been developed and implemented in parts of Sweden. Direct triaging of patients with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) to physiotherapists at primary healthcare centres has been proposed as an alternative to initial assessment by general practitioners (GPs) and has been shown to have many positive effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness from the societal perspective of this new care-pathway through primary care regarding triaging patients with MSD to initial assessment by physiotherapists compared to standard practice with initial GP assessment.
Nurse-assessed patients with MSD (N =?55) were randomised to initial assessment and treatment with either physiotherapists or GPs and were followed for 1?year regarding health-related quality of life, utilization of healthcare resources and absence from work for MSD. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were calculated based on EQ5D measured at 5 time-points. Costs for healthcare resources and production loss were compiled. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERS) were calculated. Multiple imputation was used to compensate for missing values and bootstrapping to handle uncertainty. A cost-effectiveness plane and a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve were construed to describe the results.
The group who were allocated to initial assessment by physiotherapists had slightly larger gains in QALYs at lower total costs. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of 20,000 €, the likelihood that the intervention was cost-effective from a societal perspective including production loss due to MSD was 85% increasing to 93% at higher thresholds. When only healthcare costs were considered, triaging to physiotherapists was still less costly in relation to health improvements than standard praxis.
From the societal perspective, this small study indicated that triaging directly to physiotherapists in primary care has a high likelihood of being cost-effective. However, further larger randomised trials will be necessary to corroborate these findings.
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02218749 . Registered August 18, 2014.
PubMed ID
31043169 View in PubMed
Less detail

18 records – page 1 of 2.