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Antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater treatment systems and receiving waters in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294222
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Nov 15; 598:1085-1094
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-15-2017
Author
Kara D Neudorf
Yan Nan Huang
Colin M Ragush
Christopher K Yost
Rob C Jamieson
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Process Engineering and Applied Science, Dalhousie University, 1360 Barrington Street, Halifax B3H 4R2, Canada.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Nov 15; 598:1085-1094
Date
Nov-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Drug Resistance, Bacterial - genetics
Environmental monitoring
Genes, Bacterial
Nunavut
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
Domestic wastewater discharges may adversely impact arctic ecosystems and local indigenous people, who rely on being able to hunt and harvest food from their local environment. Therefore, there is a need to develop efficient wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), which can be operated in remote communities under extreme climatic conditions. WWTPs have been identified as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). The objective of this work was to quantify the presence of nine different ARG markers (int1, sul1, sul2, tet(O), erm(B), mecA, blaCTX-M, blaTEM, and qnr(S)) in two passive systems (waste stabilization ponds [WSPs]) and one mechanical filtration plant operating in two smaller and one large community, respectively, in Nunavut, Canada. Measurement of water quality parameters (carbonaceous oxygen demand, ammonia, total suspended solids, Escherichia coli and total coliforms) showed that the WWTPs provided only primary treatment. Low levels of the ARGs (2logcopies/mL) were observed in the effluent, demonstrating that bacteria residing in three northern WWTPs harbour ARGs conferring resistance to multiple clinically-relevant classes of antibiotics. Our results indicate that long-term storage in WSPs benefitted removal of organic material and some ARGs. However, one WSP system showed evidence of the enrichment of sul1, sul2, mecA, tet(O) and qnr(S). Further research is needed to fully understand if these ARG releases pose a risk to human health, especially in the context of traditional hunting and fishing activities.
PubMed ID
28482456 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater treatment systems and receiving waters in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282398
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 May 02;598:1085-1094
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-02-2017
Author
Kara D Neudorf
Yan Nan Huang
Colin M Ragush
Christopher K Yost
Rob C Jamieson
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 May 02;598:1085-1094
Date
May-02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Domestic wastewater discharges may adversely impact arctic ecosystems and local indigenous people, who rely on being able to hunt and harvest food from their local environment. Therefore, there is a need to develop efficient wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), which can be operated in remote communities under extreme climatic conditions. WWTPs have been identified as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). The objective of this work was to quantify the presence of nine different ARG markers (int1, sul1, sul2, tet(O), erm(B), mecA, blaCTX-M, blaTEM, and qnr(S)) in two passive systems (waste stabilization ponds [WSPs]) and one mechanical filtration plant operating in two smaller and one large community, respectively, in Nunavut, Canada. Measurement of water quality parameters (carbonaceous oxygen demand, ammonia, total suspended solids, Escherichia coli and total coliforms) showed that the WWTPs provided only primary treatment. Low levels of the ARGs (2logcopies/mL) were observed in the effluent, demonstrating that bacteria residing in three northern WWTPs harbour ARGs conferring resistance to multiple clinically-relevant classes of antibiotics. Our results indicate that long-term storage in WSPs benefitted removal of organic material and some ARGs. However, one WSP system showed evidence of the enrichment of sul1, sul2, mecA, tet(O) and qnr(S). Further research is needed to fully understand if these ARG releases pose a risk to human health, especially in the context of traditional hunting and fishing activities.
PubMed ID
28482456 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of Arctic Community Wastewater Impacts on Marine Benthic Invertebrates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258603
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Dec 24;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-24-2014
Author
Kira A Krumhansl
Wendy H Krkosek
Mark Greenwood
Colin Ragush
Jordan Schmidt
Jon Grant
Jeff Barrell
Lin Lu
Buuan Lam
Graham A Gagnon
Rob C Jamieson
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Dec 24;
Date
Dec-24-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This study sought to understand the performance of arctic treatment systems and the impact of wastewater effluent on benthic invertebrate communities in arctic receiving water habitats. Effluent quality and benthic impacts were monitored in the receiving water of five communities across Nunavut that differed in the type and level of treatment achieved by wastewater infrastructure, the volume of effluent and receiving water mixing environment. We detected minimal impacts to benthic communities (
PubMed ID
25514191 View in PubMed
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Chemical and microbial characteristics of municipal drinking water supply systems in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283404
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jun 13;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-13-2017
Author
Kiley Daley
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Rob C Jamieson
Jenny L Hayward
Greg S Piorkowski
Wendy Krkosek
Graham A Gagnon
Heather Castleden
Kristen MacNeil
Joanna Poltarowicz
Emmalina Corriveau
Amy Jackson
Justine Lywood
Yannan Huang
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jun 13;
Date
Jun-13-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Drinking water in the vast Arctic Canadian territory of Nunavut is sourced from surface water lakes or rivers and transferred to man-made or natural reservoirs. The raw water is at a minimum treated by chlorination and distributed to customers either by trucks delivering to a water storage tank inside buildings or through a piped distribution system. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and microbial drinking water quality from source to tap in three hamlets (Coral Harbour, Pond Inlet and Pangnirtung-each has a population of 0.2 mg/L free chlorine). Some buildings in the four communities contained manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and/or lead (Pb) concentrations above Health Canada guideline values for the aesthetic (Mn, Cu and Fe) and health (Pb) objectives. Corrosion of components of the drinking water distribution system (household storage tanks, premise plumbing) could be contributing to Pb, Cu and Fe levels, as the source water in three of the four communities had low alkalinity. The results point to the need for robust disinfection, which may include secondary disinfection or point-of-use disinfection, to prevent microbial risks in drinking water tanks in buildings and ultimately at the tap.
PubMed ID
28612312 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chemical and microbial characteristics of municipal drinking water supply systems in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297661
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32926-32937
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Kiley Daley
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Rob C Jamieson
Jenny L Hayward
Greg S Piorkowski
Wendy Krkosek
Graham A Gagnon
Heather Castleden
Kristen MacNeil
Joanna Poltarowicz
Emmalina Corriveau
Amy Jackson
Justine Lywood
Yannan Huang
Author Affiliation
Centre for Water Resources Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32926-32937
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Chlorine - analysis
Disinfection - methods
Drinking Water - analysis - chemistry - microbiology
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Family Characteristics
Fresh Water - analysis - chemistry - microbiology
Halogenation
Humans
Nunavut
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Water Microbiology
Water Purification - methods
Water Quality
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
Drinking water in the vast Arctic Canadian territory of Nunavut is sourced from surface water lakes or rivers and transferred to man-made or natural reservoirs. The raw water is at a minimum treated by chlorination and distributed to customers either by trucks delivering to a water storage tank inside buildings or through a piped distribution system. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and microbial drinking water quality from source to tap in three hamlets (Coral Harbour, Pond Inlet and Pangnirtung-each has a population of 0.2 mg/L free chlorine). Some buildings in the four communities contained manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and/or lead (Pb) concentrations above Health Canada guideline values for the aesthetic (Mn, Cu and Fe) and health (Pb) objectives. Corrosion of components of the drinking water distribution system (household storage tanks, premise plumbing) could be contributing to Pb, Cu and Fe levels, as the source water in three of the four communities had low alkalinity. The results point to the need for robust disinfection, which may include secondary disinfection or point-of-use disinfection, to prevent microbial risks in drinking water tanks in buildings and ultimately at the tap.
PubMed ID
28612312 View in PubMed
Less detail

Disinfection and removal of human pathogenic bacteria in arctic waste stabilization ponds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281067
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar 29;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-2017
Author
Yannan Huang
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Colin M Ragush
Rob C Jamieson
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar 29;
Date
Mar-29-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Wastewater stabilization ponds (WSPs) are commonly used to treat municipal wastewater in Arctic Canada. The biological treatment in the WSPs is strongly influenced by climatic conditions. Currently, there is limited information about the removal of fecal and pathogenic bacteria during the short cool summer treatment season. With relevance to public health, the objectives of this paper were to determine if treatment in arctic WSPs resulted in the disinfection (i.e., removal of fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli) and removal of selected human bacterial pathogens from the treated effluent. The treatment performance, with focus on microbial removal, was assessed for the one-cell WSP in Pond Inlet (Nunavut [NU]) and two-cell WSP in Clyde River (NU) over three consecutive (2012-2014) summer treatment seasons (late June-early September). The WSPs provided a primary disinfection treatment of the wastewater with a 2-3 Log removal of generic indicator E. coli. The bacterial pathogens Salmonella spp., pathogenic E. coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, but not Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter pylori, were detected in the untreated and treated wastewater, indicating that human pathogens were not reliably removed. Seasonal and annual variations in temperature significantly (p 
PubMed ID
28353112 View in PubMed
Less detail

Disinfection and removal of human pathogenic bacteria in arctic waste stabilization ponds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297766
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32881-32893
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Yannan Huang
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Colin M Ragush
Rob C Jamieson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Water Resources Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32881-32893
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bacteria
Disinfection - methods
Environmental Biomarkers
Escherichia coli
Feces - microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes
Nunavut
Ponds - microbiology
Salmonella
Seasons
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Wastewater stabilization ponds (WSPs) are commonly used to treat municipal wastewater in Arctic Canada. The biological treatment in the WSPs is strongly influenced by climatic conditions. Currently, there is limited information about the removal of fecal and pathogenic bacteria during the short cool summer treatment season. With relevance to public health, the objectives of this paper were to determine if treatment in arctic WSPs resulted in the disinfection (i.e., removal of fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli) and removal of selected human bacterial pathogens from the treated effluent. The treatment performance, with focus on microbial removal, was assessed for the one-cell WSP in Pond Inlet (Nunavut [NU]) and two-cell WSP in Clyde River (NU) over three consecutive (2012-2014) summer treatment seasons (late June-early September). The WSPs provided a primary disinfection treatment of the wastewater with a 2-3 Log removal of generic indicator E. coli. The bacterial pathogens Salmonella spp., pathogenic E. coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, but not Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter pylori, were detected in the untreated and treated wastewater, indicating that human pathogens were not reliably removed. Seasonal and annual variations in temperature significantly (p 
PubMed ID
28353112 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fate of antibiotic resistance genes in two Arctic tundra wetlands impacted by municipal wastewater.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293400
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Nov 15; 642:1415-1428
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-15-2018
Author
Jennifer L Hayward
Amy J Jackson
Christopher K Yost
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Rob C Jamieson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Water Resources Studies, Department of Civil & Resource Engineering, Dalhousie University, 1360 Barrington St., Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2, Canada. Electronic address: jenny.hayward@dal.ca.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Nov 15; 642:1415-1428
Date
Nov-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In the Canadian Arctic, it is common practice to discharge municipal wastewater into tundra wetlands. Antibiotic resistant bacteria and the antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) they contain can be present in municipal wastewater and there is a scarcity of knowledge on ARGs in wastewater in Arctic environments. This study was initiated on the fate of ARGs in tundra wetland ecosystems impacted by anthropogenic wastewater sources in Arctic communities. In the summer season of 2016, two wetlands were studied in the Inuit communities of Sanikiluaq and Naujaat in Nunavut, Canada. Genomic DNA was extracted from both soil and water during the spring freshet and late summer in the wetlands, and a suite of nine clinically relevant ARGs (sul1, sul2, mecA, vanA, qnrS, ermB, tetO, blaTEM, blaCTX-M), and an integron gene (int1) were analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Hydrological and water quality measurements were conducted in conjunction with the microbiological sampling. Gene targets were consistently present in the wastewater, and throughout both wetlands, except for vanA and mecA. Concentrations of ARGs were greater during the spring freshet, due to short hydraulic retention times (
PubMed ID
30045522 View in PubMed
Less detail

Predicting microalgae growth and phosphorus removal in cold region waste stabilization ponds using a stochastic modelling approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283345
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jun 28;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-28-2017
Author
Jordan J Schmidt
Graham A Gagnon
Rob C Jamieson
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jun 28;
Date
Jun-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A stochastic ecological model with an integrated equilibrium temperature model was developed to predict microalgae growth and phosphorus removal in cold region waste stabilization ponds (WSPs). The model utilized a Monte Carlo simulation to account for parameter uncertainty. The equilibrium temperature model was parameterized using field data collected from two WSPs in Nunavut, Canada, from 2012 to 2014. The equilibrium temperature model provided good agreement with field data on a daily time step. The full model was run using historic (1956-2005) temperature and solar radiation data from five communities (Baker Lake, Cambridge Bay, Coral Harbour, Hall Beach, Resolute) in Nunavut, Canada. The communities represented a range of geographical locations and environmental conditions. Logistic regression on pooled model outputs showed that mean July temperature and mean treatment season temperature (June 1-September 15, ice-free period) provided the best predictors for microalgae growth. They had a predictive success rate of 93 and 88%, respectively. The modelled threshold (50% probability from the Monte Carlo simulation) for microalgae growth was 8.7 and 5.6 °C for the July temperature and mean treatment season temperature, respectively. The logistic regression was applied to each community (except Sanikiluaq) in Nunavut using historic climate data and a probability of microalgae growth was calculated. Based on the model results, soluble phosphorus concentrations consistent with secondary treatment could be achieved if WSP depth is less than 2 m. The model demonstrated a robust method to predict whether a microalgae bloom will occur under a range of model parameters.
PubMed ID
28660515 View in PubMed
Less detail

Predicting microalgae growth and phosphorus removal in cold region waste stabilization ponds using a stochastic modelling approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297659
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32952-32963
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Jordan J Schmidt
Graham A Gagnon
Rob C Jamieson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Water Resources Studies, Dalhousie University, 1360 Barrington Street, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32952-32963
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Logistic Models
Microalgae - growth & development
Models, Theoretical
Monte Carlo Method
Nunavut
Phosphorus - metabolism
Ponds
Seasons
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
A stochastic ecological model with an integrated equilibrium temperature model was developed to predict microalgae growth and phosphorus removal in cold region waste stabilization ponds (WSPs). The model utilized a Monte Carlo simulation to account for parameter uncertainty. The equilibrium temperature model was parameterized using field data collected from two WSPs in Nunavut, Canada, from 2012 to 2014. The equilibrium temperature model provided good agreement with field data on a daily time step. The full model was run using historic (1956-2005) temperature and solar radiation data from five communities (Baker Lake, Cambridge Bay, Coral Harbour, Hall Beach, Resolute) in Nunavut, Canada. The communities represented a range of geographical locations and environmental conditions. Logistic regression on pooled model outputs showed that mean July temperature and mean treatment season temperature (June 1-September 15, ice-free period) provided the best predictors for microalgae growth. They had a predictive success rate of 93 and 88%, respectively. The modelled threshold (50% probability from the Monte Carlo simulation) for microalgae growth was 8.7 and 5.6 °C for the July temperature and mean treatment season temperature, respectively. The logistic regression was applied to each community (except Sanikiluaq) in Nunavut using historic climate data and a probability of microalgae growth was calculated. Based on the model results, soluble phosphorus concentrations consistent with secondary treatment could be achieved if WSP depth is less than 2 m. The model demonstrated a robust method to predict whether a microalgae bloom will occur under a range of model parameters.
PubMed ID
28660515 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.