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Effects of whole body cooling on sensory perception and manual performance in subjects with Raynaud's phenomenon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302323
Source
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology. 2001 Apr;128(4):749-57.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
Rissanen S
Hassi J
Juopperi K
Rintamäki H
Source
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology. 2001 Apr;128(4):749-57.
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Temperature Regulation
Cold Temperature
Fingers
Humans
Male
Perception
Physiology
Raynaud Disease
Physiopathology
Sensation
Skin Physiological Phenomena
Abstract
Patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) have abnormal digital vasoconstriction in response to cold. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of cooling on sensory perception and manual performance in healthy male subjects and subjects with RP. There were two groups of subjects with primary RP: 12 subjects fulfilled the criteria of Lewis (L) and the other 12 the more critical criteria of Maricq (M). Control group (C) consisted of 19 healthy men. Subjects were exposed to 5 degrees C for 60 min. Skin temperatures were measured. Finger dexterity, pinch strength, abduction/adduction of fingers, pressure perception threshold and vibration perception threshold were tested during the exposure every 15 min. At the beginning of the exposure the mean (S.E.) finger temperature was 2.5 (1.2) degrees C (P
PubMed ID
11282318 View in PubMed
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Heat balance at -5 degrees C after cold water immersion

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2945
Source
Pages 738-741 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
  1 document  
Author
Rintamaki, H.
Hassi, J.
Makinen, T.
Koskenvuo, K.
Author Affiliation
Oulu Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Finland
Source
Pages 738-741 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cold water immersion
Finland
Abstract
Two different possible behaviors at -5 degrees C after cold water immersion were studied. A test subject wearing winter clothing walked (5 km/h) on a treadmill for 45 minutes at -5 degrees C and at a wind velocity of 3 m/s with dry clothing, immediately after a thorough immersion in 5 degrees C water, or after immersion and wringing, freezing, and beating of the clothing (to remove ice). A marked heat debt (ca. 1000 kJ) was measured at the end of the cold water immersion. Attempts to dry the clothing caused an additional heat debt of ca. 300 kJ. After 45 minutes walking, the difference in heat depth between the treatments was nearly the same as before the exercise. The difference in clothing weight was only 0.9 kg between the two treatments after walking. Beating frozen clothing items could remove ice corresponding to only 0.7% of the wet weight of the clothing. Results suggest that after cold water immersion in winter, the undressing procedure could not be recommended. Instead, after initially removing boots, mittens, and hat, the subject should start walking. The water accumulated in boots and mittens should be poured out when necessary.
Documents
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Source
Pages 29-31 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49 (2 Suppl):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
) :13-28. 5. Makinen TT, Gavhed D, Holmer I, Rintamaki H. Effects of metabolic rate on thermal responses at different air velocities in -10 degrees C. Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 2001;128(4):759-768. 6. Gavhed D, Makinen T, Holmer I, Rintamaki H. Face cooling by cold wind in
  1 document  
Author
Rintamaki, H.
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu, Finland
Source
Pages 29-31 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49 (2 Suppl):29-31
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cold
Thermogenesis
Thermoreceptor
Thermoregulation
Vasoconstriction
Vasodilatation
Abstract
The thermoneutral ambient temperature for naked and resting humans is ca. 27 degrees C. Exposure to cold stimulates cold receptors of the skin which causes cold thermal sensations and stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic stimulation causes vasoconstriction in skin, arms and legs. Diminished skin and extremity blood flow increases the thermal insulation of superficial tissues more than 300% corresponding to 0.9 clo (0.13 degrees C x m(-2) x W(-1)). With thermoregulatory vasoconstriction/ vasodilatation the body heat balance can be maintained within a range of ca. 4 degrees C, the middle of the range being at ca. 21 degrees C when light clothing is used. Below the thermoneutral zone metabolic heat production (shivering) is stimulated and above the zone starts heat loss by evaporation (sweating). Cold induced vasoconstriction increases blood pressure and viscosity and decreases plasma volume consequently increasing cardiac work. Cold induced hypertensive response can be counteracted by light exercise, while starting heavy work in cold markedly increases blood pressure. Under very cold conditions the sympathetic stimulation opens the anastomoses between arterioles and venules which increases skin temperatures markedly but temporarily, especially in finger tips. Adaptation to cold takes ca. 2 weeks, whereafter the physiological responses to cold are attenuated and cold exposure is subjectively considered less stressful.
PubMed ID
17929604 View in PubMed
Documents
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Impacts of cold climate on human heat balance, performance and health in circumpolar areas

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82839
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):459-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Hassi, J
Rytkönen, M
Kotaniemi, J
Rintamäki, H
Author Affiliation
Centre for Arctic Medicine, Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Finland. juhani.hassi@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):459-67
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular responses
Cold injury
Cold-related illnesses
Heat balance
Hormonal responses
Immune responses
Prevention
Symptoms
Thermal environment
Abstract
In circumpolar areas the climate remains cool or thermoneutral during the majority of the days of the year spite of global warming. Therefore, health consequences related to cold exposure represent also in the future the majority of climate-related adverse health effects. Hot summers may be an exception. At ambient temperatures below +10 - +12 degrees C, humans experience cold stress of varying degree. Man can compensate a 10 degrees C change in ambient temperature by changing metabolic heat production by 30-40 W m(-2) or by wearing an additional/taking off ca. 0.4 clo units (corresponding to one thick clothing layer). Cold ambient temperature may be a risk for human health and cause varying levels of performance limitations. The impacts of cold exposure on health and wellbeing cause a burden to many societies in terms of lowered productivity and higher costs related to health care systems as well as public health planning and management. In order to provide preventive and protective public health actions for cold-induced adverse health effects, it is important to recognize cold related injuries, illnesses and symptoms and their turn-up temperatures, and to identify the most at-risk population subgroups and factors that increase or decrease the health risks posed by cold ambient temperatures. The majority of cold-related harmful health impacts can be prevented or managed by correct preventive and protective actions. Rapid unpredictable changes are more difficult to compensate because of lack of experience (affecting attitude and skills), preparedness (vehicles, garments, supplies, logistics etc.) and/or acclimatization.
PubMed ID
16440608 View in PubMed
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Influence of seasonally adjusted exposure to cold and darkness on cognitive performance in circumpolar residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302326
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2005 Jul;46(3):239-46.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Palinkas LA
Mäkinen TM
Pääkkönen T
Rintamäki H
Leppäluoto J
Hassi J
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2005 Jul;46(3):239-46.
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Arousal
Physiology
Cognition
Cold Climate
Cold Temperature
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Light
Neuropsychological Tests
Seasons
Abstract
The effects of seasonally adjusted 24-h exposure to cold and darkness on cognitive performance in urban circumpolar residents was assessed in 15 male subjects who spent three 24-h periods in a climatic chamber at 65 degrees latitude during the winter (January-March) and/or summer (August-September). Each subject was exposed to three different environmental conditions in random order: (1) 22 degrees C temperature and 500 lx lighting; (2) 10 degrees C temperature and 500 lx lighting; and (3) 10 degrees C temperature and 0.5-l lx lighting. Accuracy on an addition-subtraction task was significantly greater in the summer than in the winter (p= 0.038), while accuracy on a repeated acquisition task was significantly greater in the winter than in the summer (p
PubMed ID
15842414 View in PubMed
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Outdoor clothing: its relationship to geography, climate, behaviour and cold-related mortality in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301019
Source
International Journal of Biometeorology. 2001 Feb;45(1):45-51.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
Donaldson GC
Rintamäki H
Näyhä S
Source
International Journal of Biometeorology. 2001 Feb;45(1):45-51.
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Behavior
Clothing
Cold Climate
adverse effects
Europe
Epidemiology
Female
Geography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Abstract
It has been suggested, that the inhabitants of northern European regions, who experience little cold-related mortality, protect themselves outdoors by wearing more clothing, at the same temperature, than people living in southern regions where such mortality is high. Outdoor clothing data were collected in eight regions from 6583 people divided by sex and age group (50-59 and 65-74 years). Across Europe, the total clothing worn (as assessed by dry thermal insulation and numbers of items or layers) increased significantly with cold, wind, less physical activity and longer periods outdoors. Men wore 0.14 clo (1 clo = 0.115 m2 K W-1) more than women and the older people wore 0.05 clo more than the younger group (both P
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Plasma levels of endothelin-1 and atrial natriuretic peptide in men during a 2-hour stay in a cold room.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302327
Source
Acta Physiol Scand. 1991 Aug;142(4):481-5.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
Hassi J
Rintamäki H
Ruskoaho H
Leppäluoto J
Vuolteenaho O
Source
Acta Physiol Scand. 1991 Aug;142(4):481-5.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Atrial Natriuretic Factor
Blood
Body temperature
Cold Temperature
Endothelins
Humans
Male
Radioimmunoassay
Time Factors
Abstract
Male volunteers were exposed to +10 degrees C ambient temperature for 2 hours while they were sitting undressed. The levels of endothelin-1 and atrial natriuretic peptide were determined by radioimmunoassays. Control samples were obtained at thermoneutrality. The cold exposure resulted in lowering of the mean skin temperature (from 31.2 +/- 0.3 degrees C-22.6 +/- 2.5 degrees C, mean +/- SEM), which indicates that a marked vasoconstriction took place, as well as a decrease of the body heat content (by 11.2 +/- 0.7 kJ kg-1). However, plasma endothelin-1 levels did not change significantly during the exposure. Thus circulating endothelin-1 does not seem to be responsible for the vasoconstriction associated with cold air exposure. The plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels exhibited a slight increase towards the end of the cold exposure. This finding is in accord with the notion that atrial natriuretic peptide might contribute to the diuresis frequently observed in the cold.
PubMed ID
1835249 View in PubMed
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Seasonal changes in thermal responses of urban residents to cold exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302328
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol. 2004 Oct;139(2):229-38.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Mäkinen TM
Pääkkönen T
Palinkas LA
Rintamäki H
Leppäluoto J
Hassi J
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol. 2004 Oct;139(2):229-38.
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Flow Velocity
Cold Temperature
Hot Temperature
Humans
Male
Oxygen consumption
Perception
Seasons
Shivering
Metabolism
Skin temperature
Thermosensing
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
To determine whether urban circumpolar residents show seasonal acclimatisation to cold, thermoregulatory responses and thermal perception during cold exposure were examined in young men during January-March (n=7) and August-September (n=8). Subjects were exposed for 24 h to 22 and to 10 degrees C. Rectal (T(rect)) and skin temperatures were measured throughout the exposure. Oxygen consumption (VO(2)), finger skin blood flow (Q(f)), shivering and cold (CDT) and warm detection thresholds (WDT) were assessed four times during the exposure. Ratings of thermal sensations, comfort and tolerance were recorded using subjective judgement scales at 1-h intervals. During winter, subjects had a significantly higher mean skin temperature at both 22 and 10 degrees C compared with summer. However, skin temperatures decreased more at 10 degrees C in winter and remained higher only in the trunk. Finger skin temperature was higher at 22 degrees C, but lower at 10 degrees C in the winter suggesting an enhanced cold-induced vasoconstriction. Similarly, Q(f) decreased more in winter. The cold detection threshold of the hand was shifted to a lower level in the cold, and more substantially in the winter, which was related to lower skin temperatures in winter. Thermal sensations showed only slight seasonal variation. The observed seasonal differences in thermal responses suggest increased preservation of heat especially in the peripheral areas in winter. Blunted vasomotor and skin temperature responses, which are typical for habituation to cold, were not observed in winter. Instead, the responses in winter resemble aggravated reactions of non-cold acclimatised subjects.
PubMed ID
15528172 View in PubMed
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Sequelae of moderate finger frostbite as assessed by subjective sensations, clinical signs, and thermophysiological responses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293902
Source
International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2000 Apr;59(2):137-45.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000

9 records – page 1 of 1.