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Acetaminophen, aspirin and progression of advanced chronic kidney disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153050
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2009 Jun;24(6):1908-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Marie Evans
Carl Michael Fored
Rino Bellocco
Garrett Fitzmaurice
Jon P Fryzek
Joseph K McLaughlin
Olof Nyrén
Carl-Gustaf Elinder
Author Affiliation
Nephrology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. marie.evans@ki.se
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2009 Jun;24(6):1908-18
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Adult
Aged
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Aspirin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Renal Replacement Therapy
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Although many studies have investigated the possible association between analgesic use (acetaminophen and aspirin) and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the effect of analgesics on the progression of established CKD of any cause has not yet been investigated.
In this population-based Swedish cohort study, we investigated the decline over 5-7 years in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) among 801 patients with incident, advanced CKD (serum creatinine >3.4 mg/dL for men, >2.8 mg/dL for women for the first time) and with different analgesic exposures. Lifetime analgesic use and current regular use were ascertained through in-person interviews at inclusion while data on analgesic use during the follow-up was abstracted from the medical records at the end of the study period. A linear regression slope, based on their eGFR values during the follow-up, provided a summary of within-individual change. In the final multivariate analyses, a linear mixed effects model was implemented to assess the relation of analgesic use and change in eGFR over time.
The progression rate for regular users of acetaminophen was slower than that for non-regular users (regular users progressed 0.93 mL/min/1.73 m(2) per year slower than non-regular users; 95% CI 0.03, 1.8). For regular users of aspirin, the progression rate was significantly slower than that for non-regular users (regular users progressed 0.80 mL/min/1.73 m(2) per year slower than non-regular users; 95% CI 0.1, 1.5). Different levels of lifetime cumulative dose of acetaminophen and aspirin did not significantly affect the progression rate.
We suggest that single substance acetaminophen and aspirin may be safe to use by patients with diagnosed advanced CKD stage 4-5 without an adverse effect on the progression rate of the disease.
PubMed ID
19155536 View in PubMed
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Age and temporal trends of total physical activity among Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49553
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Feb;38(2):240-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Nicola Orsini
Rino Bellocco
Matteo Bottai
Marcello Pagano
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. nicola.orsini@imm.ki.se
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Feb;38(2):240-5
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: Few epidemiological studies have been conducted among middle-aged women on long-term total and specific physical activity (PA) trends. We studied in a cross-sectional setting the relationship of self-reported total daily PA with age and calendar time. METHODS: In a population-based cohort of 38,988 women aged 49-83 yr in central Sweden, information was collected on physical activity, such as work or occupation, household work, walking or bicycling, exercise, watching TV or reading, and other lifestyle factors through a self-administered questionnaire. Total and specific daily PA levels at ages 15, 30, and 50 yr were recalled retrospectively and measured as metabolic equivalents (MET.h.d(-1)). RESULTS: Total PA level linearly decreased with calendar time in all three age groups (slope for 5-yr change in calendar time among those 15 yr of age = -0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), -0.86 to -0.78; among those 30 yr of age=-0.42; 95% CI, -0.45 to -0.38; and among those 50 yr of age = -0.62; 95% CI, -0.66 to -0.58). High-intensity activities such as walking or bicycling decreased by 0.21 MET.h.d(-1) (95% CI, -0.22 to -0.20) every 5-calendar-year change among adolescents between the 1930s and 1960s. Total activity level decreased in all age groups by an average of approximately 3MET.h(-1).d(-1), corresponding to approximately 45 min of brisk walking. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that intervention efforts aimed at engaging in healthful amounts of physical activity are needed throughout the life cycle.
PubMed ID
16531890 View in PubMed
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Age and temporal trends of total physical activity in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49755
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003 Apr;35(4):617-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Anna Norman
Rino Bellocco
Florin Vaida
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003 Apr;35(4):617-22
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Occupations
Physical Fitness
Public Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sports
Sweden
Abstract
INTRODUCTION/PURPOSE: Despite a large public health interest in physical activity and its role in obesity and other chronic diseases, only few reports to date have addressed total levels and trends of physical activity. We have studied in a cross-sectional setting with a retrospective recall of physical activity an association of levels of total physical activity and different types of activities with age and with calendar-time. METHODS: In a population-based study of 33,466 men aged 45-79 yr in central Sweden, information on physical activity and other lifestyle factors was collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Level of total activity at ages 15, 30, and 50 yr was assessed quantitatively, based on six questions on different activities: work/occupation, housework, walking/bicycling, exercise, inactive leisure time, and sleeping. The physical activity levels were measured as metabolic equivalents, MET-hours per days. RESULTS: Total daily physical activity decreased at age 30 yr (-1.6%, 95% CI: -1.7, -1.4) and at age 50 yr (-3.9%, 95% CI: -4.0, -3.7) compared with age 15 yr. Total physical activity decreased over a period of 60 yr in all three separate age groups (-9.1% among 15-yr-olds, 95% CI: -9.8, -8.5; -2.3% among 30-yr-olds 95% CI: -3.0, -1.6; and -2.9% among 50-yr-olds, 95% CI: -3.4, -2.5). CONCLUSION: These negative trends in physical activity observed by age and with time might explain the trends in increasing prevalence of obesity.
PubMed ID
12673145 View in PubMed
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An interactive internet-based plate for assessing lunchtime food intake: a validation study on male employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117090
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2013;15(1):e13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Madeleine Svensson
Rino Bellocco
Linda Bakkman
Ylva Trolle Lagerros
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medicine, Unit of Clinical Epidemiology, Stockholm, Sweden. Madeleine.Svensson@hh.se
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2013;15(1):e13
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Diet Records
Eating
Humans
Internet
Lunch
Male
Middle Aged
Self Care
Sweden
Telemedicine
User-Computer Interface
Young Adult
Abstract
Misreporting food intake is common because most health screenings rely on self-reports. The more accurate methods (eg, weighing food) are costly, time consuming, and impractical.
We developed a new instrument for reporting food intake--an Internet-based interactive virtual food plate. The objective of this study was to validate this instrument's ability to assess lunch intake.
Participants were asked to compose an ordinary lunch meal using both a virtual and a real lunch plate (with real food on a real plate). The participants ate their real lunch meals on-site. Before and after pictures of the composed lunch meals were taken. Both meals included identical food items. Participants were randomized to start with either instrument. The 2 instruments were compared using correlation and concordance measures (total energy intake, nutritional components, quantity of food, and participant characteristics).
A total of 55 men (median age: 45 years, median body mass index [BMI]: 25.8 kg/m(2)) participated. We found an overall overestimation of reported median energy intake using the computer plate (3044 kJ, interquartile range [IQR] 1202 kJ) compared with the real lunch plate (2734 kJ, IQR 1051 kJ, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
23335728 View in PubMed
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Association between treatment for erectile dysfunction and death or cardiovascular outcomes after myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285066
Source
Heart. 2017 Aug;103(16):1264-1270
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Daniel P Andersson
Ylva Trolle Lagerros
Alessandra Grotta
Rino Bellocco
Mikael Lehtihet
Martin J Holzmann
Source
Heart. 2017 Aug;103(16):1264-1270
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alprostadil - therapeutic use
Cause of Death - trends
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Erectile Dysfunction - complications - drug therapy
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Phosphodiesterase 5 Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Erectile dysfunction (ED) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in healthy men. However, the association between treatment for ED and death or cardiovascular outcomes after a first myocardial infarction (MI) is unknown.
In a Swedish nationwide cohort study all men 5 dispensed prescriptions of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors was reduced by 34% (HR 0.66 (95% CI 0.38 to 1.15), 53% (HR 0.47 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.87) and 81% (HR 0.19 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.45), respectively, when compared with alprostadil treatment.
Treatment for ED after a first MI was associated with a reduced mortality and heart failure hospitalisation. Only men treated with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors had a reduced risk, which appeared to be dose-dependent.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28280146 View in PubMed
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Body mass index and mortality in men with prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265895
Source
Prostate. 2015 Aug 1;75(11):1129-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2015
Author
Anna Cantarutti
Stephanie E Bonn
Hans-Olov Adami
Henrik Grönberg
Rino Bellocco
Katarina Bälter
Source
Prostate. 2015 Aug 1;75(11):1129-36
Date
Aug-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostate - pathology
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - mortality
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Body Mass index (BMI) has been shown to affect risk and mortality of several cancers. Prostate cancer and obesity are major public health concerns for middle-aged and older men. Previous studies of pre-diagnostic BMI have found an increased risk of prostate cancer mortality in obese patients.
To study the associations between BMI at time of prostate cancer diagnosis and prostate cancer specific and overall mortality.
BMI was analyzed both as a continuous variable and categorized into four groups based on the observed distribution in the cohort (BMI?
PubMed ID
25929695 View in PubMed
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Caffeine exposure during pregnancy, small for gestational age birth and neonatal outcome - results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301107
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Feb 26; 19(1):80
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-26-2019
Author
Dominika Modzelewska
Rino Bellocco
Anders Elfvin
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Bo Jacobsson
Verena Sengpiel
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, SE-416 85, Gothenburg, Sweden. dominika.modzelewska@gu.se.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Feb 26; 19(1):80
Date
Feb-26-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Weight - drug effects
Caffeine - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - chemically induced
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Logistic Models
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Norway
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - chemically induced
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Maternal caffeine intake has repeatedly been linked to babies being born small for gestational age (SGA). SGA babies are known to be at increased risk for adverse neonatal outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the associations between prenatal caffeine exposure and neonatal health.
The study is based on 67,569 full-term singleton mother-infant pairs from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Caffeine consumption from different sources was self-reported in gestational week 22. Neonatal compound outcomes, namely (1) morbidity/mortality and (2) neonatal intervention, were created based on the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Adjusted logistic regression was performed.
Caffeine exposure was associated to SGA (OR?=?1.16, 95%CI: 1.10; 1.23) and being born SGA was significantly associated with neonatal health (OR?=?3.09, 95%CI: 2.54; 3.78 for morbidity/mortality; OR?=?3.94, 95%CI: 3.50; 4.45 for intervention). However, prenatal caffeine exposure was neither associated with neonatal morbidity/mortality (OR?=?1.01, 95%CI: 0.96; 1.07) nor neonatal intervention (OR?=?1.02, 95%CI: 1.00; 1.05 for a 100?mg caffeine intake increase). Results did not change after additional adjustment for SGA status.
Moderate prenatal caffeine exposure (
PubMed ID
30808339 View in PubMed
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Cohort Profile: The Swedish National March Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296727
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2017 06 01; 46(3):795-795e
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-01-2017

Common and country-specific dietary patterns in four European cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18057
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Dec;133(12):4246-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Helena F Balder
Mikko Virtanen
Henny A M Brants
Vittorio Krogh
L Beth Dixon
Frans Tan
Satu Mannisto
Rino Bellocco
Pirjo Pietinen
Alicja Wolk
Franco Berrino
Piet A Van den Brandt
Anne M Hartman
R Alexandra Goldbohm
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Epidemiology, TNO Nutrition and Food Research, Zeist, The Netherlands. balder@voeding.tno.nl
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Dec;133(12):4246-51
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Italy
Male
Meat
Meat products
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Netherlands
Principal Component Analysis
Prospective Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solanum tuberosum
Sweden
Swine
Vegetables
Abstract
The association between diet and cancer, predominantly investigated univariately, has often been inconsistent, possibly because of the large number of candidate risk factors and their high intercorrelations. Analysis of dietary patterns is expected to give more insight than analysis of single nutrients or foods. This study aimed to develop and apply a common methodological approach to determine dietary patterns in four cohort studies originating in Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden and Italy. Food items on each of the food frequency questionnaires were aggregated into 51 food groups, defined on the basis of their position in the diet pattern and possible relevance to cancer etiology. Exploratory factor analysis was used to analyze dietary patterns. Using a standardized approach, 3-5 stable dietary patterns were identified, explaining 20-29% of total variance in consumption of the food groups. Two dietary patterns, which explained most of the variance, were consistent across the studies. The first pattern was characterized by high consumption of (salad) vegetables, the second by high consumption of pork, processed meat and potatoes. In addition, a few specifically national food patterns were identified. Sensitivity analyses showed that the identified patterns were robust for number of factors extracted, distribution of input variables and energy adjustment. Our findings suggest that some important eating patterns are shared by the four populations under study, whereas other eating patterns are population specific.
PubMed ID
14652380 View in PubMed
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Delayed intracranial complications after concussion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167550
Source
J Trauma. 2006 Sep;61(3):577-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Catharina Nygren de Boussard
Rino Bellocco
Jean-Luc af Geijerstam
Jörgen Borg
Johanna Adami
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. catharina.deboussard@ds.se
Source
J Trauma. 2006 Sep;61(3):577-81
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brain Concussion - complications - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Intracranial Hemorrhages - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Skull Fractures - radiography
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The incidence of readmissions because of delayed intracranial complications within 3 weeks after observation for the sole diagnosis of concussion was examined in a national cohort. A nested case-control design was used to analyze the association between clinical factors as well as early computed tomography (CT) scan examination and these complications.
Out of 100,784 patients hospitalized because of concussion during ten years, 127 (0.13%) patients were readmitted because of a delayed intracranial complication. High clinical severity grade (odds ratio [OR] 2.0, confidence interval [CI] 1.2-3.6), minor CT scan abnormalities (OR 1.7, CI 0.8-3.4) and male gender (OR 2.2, CI 1.4-3.5) were associated with an increased risk of delayed, intracranial complications.
The incidence of delayed intracranial complications after primarily uncomplicated concussion was low. High clinical severity grade and male gender were risk factors. We failed to demonstrate an additional value of the acute CT scan examination to predict these complications.
PubMed ID
16966990 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.