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Circumpolar health collaborations: a description of players and a call for further dialogue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129813
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):576-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011

Community mobilization for rural suicide prevention: Process, learning and behavioral outcomes from Promoting Community Conversations About Research to End Suicide (PC CARES) in Northwest Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300233
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2019 May 23; 232:398-407
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-23-2019
Author
Lisa Wexler
Suzanne Rataj
Jerreed Ivanich
Jya Plavin
Anna Mullany
Roberta Moto
Tanya Kirk
Eva Goldwater
Rhonda Johnson
Kirk Dombrowski
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 715 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA, 01003, United States. Electronic address: lwexler@umich.edu.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2019 May 23; 232:398-407
Date
May-23-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
This study evaluates the process and preliminary outcomes of Promoting Community Conversations About Research to End Suicide (PC CARES), an intervention that brings key stakeholders together so they can discuss suicide prevention research and find ways to put it into practice. Originally piloted in remote and rural Alaskan communities, the approach shows promise.
Using a multi-method design, the study describes a series of locally-facilitated "learning circles" over 15 months and their preliminary results. Sign-in sheets documented participation. Transcriptions of audio-recorded sessions captured facilitator fidelity, accuracy, and the dominant themes of community discussions. Linked participant surveys (n=83) compared attendees' perceived knowledge, skills, attitudes, and their 'community of practice' at baseline and follow-up. A cross-sectional design compared 112 participants' with 335 non-participants' scores on knowledge and prevention behaviors, and considered the social impact with social network analyses.
Demonstrating feasibility in small rural communities, local PC CARES facilitators hosted 59 two to three hour learning circles with 535 participants (376 unique). Local facilitators achieved acceptable fidelity to the model (80%), and interpreted the research accurately 81% of the time. Discussions reflected participants' understanding of the research content and its use in their lives. Participants showed positive changes in perceived knowledge, skills, and attitudes and strengthened their 'community of practice' from baseline to follow-up. Social network analyses indicate PC CARES had social impact, sustaining and enhancing prevention activities of non-participants who were 'close to' participants. These close associates were more likely take preventive actions than other non-participants after the intervention.
PC CARES offers a practical, scalable method for community-based translation of research evidence into selfdetermined, culturally-responsive suicide prevention practice.
PubMed ID
31151026 View in PubMed
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Examining DNA fingerprinting as an epidemiology tool in the tuberculosis program in the Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113922
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Cheryl Case
Kami Kandola
Linda Chui
Vincent Li
Nancy Nix
Rhonda Johnson
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences, University of Alaska, Anchorage, AK, USA. cheryl_case@gov.nt.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
DNA Fingerprinting
DNA, Bacterial
Female
Health Behavior
Homeless Persons
Humans
Inuits
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - genetics
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Tuberculosis - ethnology - genetics - transmission
Young Adult
Abstract
Tuberculosis (TB) is an important public health problem in the Northwest Territories (NWT), particularly among Canadian Aboriginal people.
To analyse the transmission patterns of tuberculosis among the population living in the NWT, a territorial jurisdiction located within Northern Canada.
This population-based retrospective study examined the DNA fingerprints of all laboratory confirmed cases of TB in the NWT, Canada, between 1990 and 2009. An isolate of each lab-confirmed case had genotyping done using IS6110 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism. DNA patterns were assigned to each DNA fingerprint, and indistinguishable fingerprints patterns were assigned a cluster. Social network analysis (SNA) was used to examine direct linkages among cases determined through conventional contact tracing (CCT), their DNA fingerprint and home community.
Of the 225 lab-confirmed cases identified, the study was limited to 195 subjects due to DNA fingerprinting data availability. The mean age of the cases was 43.8 years (±22.6) and 120 (61.5%) males. The Dene (First Nations) encompassed 120 of the cases (87.7%), 8 cases (4.1%) were Inuit, 2 cases (1.0%) were Metis, 7 cases (3.6%) were Immigrants and 1 case had unknown ethnicity. One hundred and eighty six (95.4%) subjects were clustered, resulting in 8 clusters. Trend analysis showed significant relationships between with risk factors for unemployment (p=0.020), geographic location (p=0.001) and homelessness (p=0.001). Other significant risk factors included excessive alcohol consumption, prior infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and prior contact with a case of TB.
This study demonstrates how DNA fingerprinting and SNA can be additional epidemiological tools, along with CCT method, to determine transmission patterns of TB.
Notes
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2007 Nov 15;196(10):1517-2718008232
Cites: Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2009 Jun;13(6):767-7419460255
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Aug 20;167(4):349-5212197687
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Nov;8(11):1188-9112453341
Cites: Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2003 Feb;7(2):132-812588013
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Cites: Am J Public Health. 2007 Mar;97(3):470-717018825
PubMed ID
23671837 View in PubMed
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Introduction [Public Health Perspectives]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284448
Source
Pages 33-36 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69(Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
PUBLIC HEALTH PERSPECTIVES @M§;;;~ INTRODUCTION Rhonda Johnson, DrPH, MPH, FNP Chair, Department of Health Sciences Associate Professor of Public Health MPH Program Coordinator University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) Anchorage, Alaska, USA "Major advances come from collective action
  1 document  
Author
Rhonda Johnson
Author Affiliation
Chair - Department of Health Sciences, Associate Professor of Public Health, MPH Program Coordinator, University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA), Anchorage, Alaska, USA
Source
Pages 33-36 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69(Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
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Pan-Arctic TV Series on Inuit wellness: a northern model of communication for social change?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133456
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Jun;70(3):236-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Rhonda Johnson
Robin Morales
Doreen Leavitt
Catherine Carry
Dianne Kinnon
Denise Rideout
Kath Clarida
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK 99508-4614, USA. Rhonda.Johnson@uaa.alaska.edu
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Jun;70(3):236-44
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Canada
Data Collection
Greenland
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Models, Theoretical
Persuasive Communication
Social Change
Television
Abstract
This paper provides highlights of a utilization-focused evaluation of a collaborative Pan-Arctic Inuit Wellness TV Series that was broadcast live in Alaska and Canada in May 2009. This International Polar Year (IPY) communication and outreach project intended to (1) share information on International Polar Year research progress, disseminate findings and explore questions with Inuit in Alaska, Canada and Greenland; (2) provide a forum for Inuit in Alaska, Canada and Greenland to showcase innovative health and wellness projects; (3) ensure Inuit youth and adult engagement throughout; and (4) document and reflect on the overall experience for the purposes of developing and "testing" a participatory communication model.
Utilization-focused formative evaluation of the project, with a focus on overall objectives, key messages and lessons learned to facilitate program improvement.
Participant observation, surveys, key informant interviews, document review and website tracking.
Promising community programs related to 3 themes - men's wellness, maternity care and youth resilience - in diverse circumpolar regions were highlighted, as were current and stillevolving findings from ongoing Arctic research. Multiple media methods were used to effectively deliver and receive key messages determined by both community and academic experts. Local capacity and new regional networks were strengthened. Evidence-based resources for health education and community action were archived in digital formats (websites and DVDs), increasing accessibility to otherwise isolated individuals and remote communities.
The Pan-Arctic Inuit Wellness TV Series was an innovative, multi-dimensional communication project that raised both interest and awareness about complex health conditions in the North and stimulated community dialogue and potential for increased collaborative action. Consistent with a communication for social change approach, the project created new networks, increased motivation to act and provided new tools to do so, and increased local community involvement and "voice" in the discussion and dissemination of successful strategies to promote Inuit wellness.
PubMed ID
21703132 View in PubMed
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A Process Evaluation of the Alaska Native Colorectal Cancer Family Outreach Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275262
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2016 Feb;43(1):35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Diana Redwood
Ellen Provost
Ellen D S Lopez
Monica Skewes
Rhonda Johnson
Claudia Christensen
Frank Sacco
Donald Haverkamp
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2016 Feb;43(1):35-42
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis
Early Detection of Cancer - methods
Family
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Inuits
Mass Screening
Minority Groups
Patient Navigation
Program Evaluation
Abstract
This article presents the results of a process evaluation of the Alaska Native (AN) Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Family Outreach Program, which encourages CRC screening among AN first-degree relatives (i.e., parents, siblings, adult children; hereafter referred to as relatives) of CRC patients. Among AN people incidence and death rates from CRC are the highest of any ethnic/racial group in the United States. Relatives of CRC patients are at increased risk; however, CRC can be prevented and detected early through screening. The evaluation included key informant interviews (August to November 2012) with AN and non-AN stakeholders and program document review. Five key process evaluation components were identified: program formation, evolution, outreach responses, strengths, and barriers and challenges. Key themes included an incremental approach that led to a fully formed program and the need for dedicated, culturally competent patient navigation. Challenges included differing relatives' responses to screening outreach, health system data access and coordination, and the program impact of reliance on grant funding. This program evaluation indicated a need for more research into motivating patient screening behaviors, electronic medical records systems quality improvement projects, improved data-sharing protocols, and program sustainability planning to continue the dedicated efforts to promote screening in this increased risk population.
Notes
Cites: Prim Care. 2009 Sep;36(3):575-60219616156
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Aug;72(2):210-718467066
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2003 Feb;124(2):544-6012557158
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Cites: Prev Med. 2001 Aug;33(2 Pt 1):128-3611493046
PubMed ID
26157041 View in PubMed
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A scoping review of traditional food security in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288013
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec;77(1):1419678
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Amanda Walch
Andrea Bersamin
Philip Loring
Rhonda Johnson
Melissa Tholl
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec;77(1):1419678
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Food insecurity is a public health concern. Food security includes the pillars of food access, availability and utilisation. For some indigenous peoples, this may also include traditional foods. To conduct a scoping review on traditional foods and food security in Alaska. Google Scholar and the High North Research Documents were used to search for relevant primary research using the following terms: "traditional foods", "food security", "access", "availability", "utilisation", "Alaska", "Alaska Native" and "indigenous". Twenty four articles from Google Scholar and four articles from the High North Research Documents were selected. The articles revealed three types of research approaches, those that quantified traditional food intake (n=18), those that quantified food security (n=2), and qualitative articles that addressed at least one pillar of food security (n=8). Limited primary research is available on food security in Alaskan. Few studies directly measure food security while most provide a review of food security factors. Research investigating dietary intake of traditional foods is more prevalent, though many differences exist among participant age groups and geographical areas. Future research should include direct measurements of traditional food intake and food security to provide a more complete picture of traditional food security in Alaska.
Notes
Cites: J Am Coll Nutr. 2015;34(1):65-7225648562
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):403-1517319085
Cites: J Nutr. 2005 Apr;135(4):856-6215795447
Cites: J Nutr. 2007 Apr;137(4):1110-417374689
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Cites: BMC Public Health. 2017 Jun 15;17 (1):57828619039
PubMed ID
29292675 View in PubMed
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A scoping review of traditional food security in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298121
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1419678
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Amanda Walch
Philip Loring
Rhonda Johnson
Melissa Tholl
Andrea Bersamin
Author Affiliation
a Department of Biology & Wildlife , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1419678
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Food
Food Supply
Humans
Abstract
Food insecurity is a public health concern. The pillars of food security include food access, availability and utilisation. For some indigenous peoples, the pillars may focus on traditional foods.
To conduct a scoping review on traditional foods and food security in Alaska.
Google Scholar and the High North Research Documents were used to search for relevant primary research using the following terms: “traditional foods”, “food security”, “access”, “availability”, “utilisation”, “Alaska”, “Alaska Native” and “indigenous”.
Twenty four articles from Google Scholar and four articles from the High North Research Documents met the inclusion criteria. The articles revealed three types of research approaches, those that quantified traditional food intake (n=18), those that quantified food security (n=2), and qualitative articles that addressed at least one pillar of food security (n=8).
Studies that estimate the prevalence of traditional food insecurity in Alaska are virtually absent from the literature. Instead most studies provide a review of factors related to food security. Research investigating dietary intake of traditional foods is more prevalent. Future research should include direct measurements of traditional food intake and food security to provide a more complete picture of traditional food security in Alaska.
PubMed ID
29292675 View in PubMed
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Traditional Food Practices, Attitudes, and Beliefs in Urban Alaska Native Women Receiving WIC Assistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295785
Source
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2018 Nov 05; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-05-2018
Author
Amanda Walch
Philip Loring
Rhonda Johnson
Melissa Tholl
Andrea Bersamin
Author Affiliation
Dietetics and Nutrition Department, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK.
Source
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2018 Nov 05; :
Date
Nov-05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
To identify practices, attitudes, and beliefs associated with intake of traditional foods among Alaska Native women.
Cross-sectional study that measured traditional food intake; participation in food-sharing networks; presence of a hunter or fisherman in the home; the preference, healthfulness, and economic value of traditional foods; and financial barriers to obtaining these foods.
Purposive sample of 71 low-income Alaska Native women receiving Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) assistance in Anchorage, AK.
Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses.
Traditional foods contributed 4% of total daily calories. Given a choice, 63% of participants indicated that they would prefer half or more of the foods they ate to be traditional (ie, not store-bought). The majority of participants (64%) believed that traditional foods were healthier than store-bought foods. Of all participants, 72% relied on food-sharing networks for traditional foods; only 21% acquired traditional foods themselves. Participants who ate more traditional foods preferred traditional foods (B?=?.011 P?=?.02).
Traditional food intake was low and findings suggested that Alaska Native women living in an urban setting prefer to consume more but are unable to do so. Future research might examine the effect of enhancing social networks and implementing policies that support traditional food intake.
PubMed ID
30409694 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.