Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Cardiac troponin-I as a screening tool for myocarditis in children hospitalized for viral infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94837
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2009 Nov 4;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2009
Author
RenkoM.
LeskinenM.
KontiokariT.
TapiainenT.
HedbergP.
UhariM.
Author Affiliation
.Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2009 Nov 4;
Date
Nov-4-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Aim: The incidence of myocarditis in children is uncertain because patients with minor symptoms can remain undiagnosed. We hypothesized that screening all children who are hospitalized for an acute infection with troponin-I (TnI) would reveal myocarditis cases and performed a prospective screening study. Methods: Between October 2005 and July 2008, a blood sample for TnI measurement was taken every time a sample for C-reactive protein measurement was drawn. If TnI value was above the screening limit (0.06 mug/L), electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac ultrasound were performed. TnI measurements were repeated until at normal level. Results: Altogether, 1009 children were screened during the 33 months. TnI was above the screening limit (0.06 mug/L) in six children. None of them had any signs of myocarditis in ECG or cardiac ultrasound. Five of those six children were younger than 30 days. All had a respiratory infection as a cause for hospitalization, three of which was caused by RSV. In four children, all younger than 30 days, TnI levels remained high (>0.37 mug/L) for two months, but decreased after that to normal levels. Conclusion: The incidence of myocarditis during viral infections is low and a routine TnI screening for asymptomatic myocarditis is not useful.
PubMed ID
19889104 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nasopharyngeal dimensions in magnetic resonance imaging and the risk of acute otitis media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79138
Source
J Laryngol Otol. 2007 Jan 16;:1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-16-2007
Author
RenkoM.
KristoA.
TapiainenT.
KoivunenP.
IlkkoE.
AlhoO-P
UhariM.
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Laryngol Otol. 2007 Jan 16;:1-4
Date
Jan-16-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background: We have previously found by lateral cephalometry an association between nasopharyngeal anatomy and the risk of acute otitis media (AOM). We evaluate here the association of nasopharyngeal dimensions in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the occurrence of AOM in otherwise healthy children.Methods: Sixty-one healthy children (mean age 5.7 years, range 3.9-6.9) were recruited from child care centres. The parents filled in a questionnaire on the child's history of ear infections and adenoidectomy. MRI was performed with a 4 mm slice thickness during an upper respiratory infection. Five dimensions and two angles expressing the structure of the bony nasopharynx were measured in sagittal images.Results: The dimension from the caudal edge of the septum to the midpoint of the sella, reflecting the height of the nasopharynx, was on average 2.2 mm smaller in the children who had had AOM attacks during the last 12 months than those without attacks (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9 to 3.4, p=0.001) and the nasal base angle was on average 2.1 degrees smaller (95% CI 0.7 to 3.5, p=0.004). These differences remained significant after adjustment for age, sex and previous adenoidectomy in the logistic modelling. A history of adenoidectomy did not have any effect on the dimensions.Conclusions: The nasopharynx was smaller in the children with AOM attacks during the last year. The value of this finding for predicting susceptibility to recurrent AOM and directing preventive procedures should be evaluated.
PubMed ID
17224090 View in PubMed
Less detail