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Characteristics of complaints resulting in disciplinary actions against Danish GPs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108313
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Sep;31(3):153-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Søren Birkeland
Rene Depont Christensen
Niels Damsbo
Jakob Kragstrup
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. sbirkeland@health.sdu.dk
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Sep;31(3):153-7
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Communication
Denmark
Dissent and Disputes
Employee Discipline - trends
Female
General Practitioners - standards
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Jurisprudence
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Young Adult
Abstract
The risk of being disciplined in connection with a complaint case causes distress to most general practitioners. The present study examined the characteristics of complaint cases resulting in disciplinary action.
The Danish Patients' Complaints Board's decisions concerning general practice in 2007 were examined. Information on the motives for complaining, as well as patient and general practitioner characteristics, was extracted and the association with case outcome (disciplinary or no disciplinary action) was analysed. Variables included complaint motives, patient gender and age, urgency of illness, cancer diagnosis, healthcare settings (daytime or out-of-hours services), and general practitioner gender and professional seniority.
Cases where the complaint motives involved a wish for placement of responsibility (OR = 2.35, p = 0.01) or a wish for a review of the general practitioner's competence (OR = 1.95, p = 0.02) were associated with increased odds of the general practitioner being disciplined. The odds of discipline decreased when the complaint was motivated by a feeling of being devalued (OR = 0.39, p = 0.02) or a request for an explanation (OR = 0.46, p = 0.01). With regard to patient and general practitioner characteristics, higher general practitioner professional seniority was associated with increased odds of discipline (OR = 1.97 per 20 additional years of professional seniority, p = 0.01). None of the other characteristics was statistically significantly associated with discipline in the multiple logistic regression model.
Complaint motives and professional seniority were associated with decision outcomes. Further research is needed on the impact of professional seniority on performance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23906082 View in PubMed
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Concurrent use of tramadol and oral vitamin K antagonists and the risk of excessive anticoagulation: a register-based nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122117
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2013 Mar;69(3):641-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Anton Pottegård
Peter M Meegaard
Line H V Holck
Rene dePont Christensen
Hanne Madsen
Jesper Hallas
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Clinical Pharmacology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. apottegaard@health.sdu.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2013 Mar;69(3):641-6
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics, Opioid - adverse effects
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Blood Coagulation - drug effects
Case-Control Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark
Drug Interactions
Drug Prescriptions
Female
Hemorrhage - blood - chemically induced
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Patient Selection
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Tramadol - adverse effects
Vitamin K - antagonists & inhibitors
Abstract
The objective was to assess whether the concurrent use of tramadol and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) leads to an increased risk of excessive anticoagulation.
The study was designed as a case-control study, nested within users of VKA and with tramadol use as our main exposure. We used conditional logistic regression to control for potential confounders.
Prescription data from primary care were obtained from Odense Pharmacoepidemiological Database (OPED). Information about hospital admissions was obtained from the patient administrative system of Funen County (FPAS).
Both cases and controls were selected from users of VKA. Cases were defined by being hospitalised with a main diagnosis indicating excessive anticoagulation. For each case, we selected 15 controls among VKA users, matched by age and sex.
Odds ratio for experiencing excessive anticoagulation attributable to the use of tramadol.
A total of 178 patients were included, 30 of which were exposed to tramadol, along with 2643 controls, 114 of which were exposed to tramadol. The adjusted odds-ratio for experiencing excessive anticoagulation during use of tramadol was 3.1 (1.9-5.2). This corresponds to, on average, one excess case per 250 treatment years (CI 125-584). The result is potentially confounded by concomitant paracetamol use and the presence of acute illness.
Caution is advised when using tramadol in patients using VKA, and if possible, an alternative pain-medication should be used.
PubMed ID
22847619 View in PubMed
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Dementia and road traffic accidents among non-institutionalized older people in Denmark: A Danish register-based nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299164
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Mar; 47(2):221-228
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Jindong Ding Petersen
Volkert Dirk Siersma
René Depont Christensen
Maria Munch Storsveen
Connie Thurøe Nielsen
Mikkel Vass
Frans Boch Waldorff
Author Affiliation
1 Research Unit for General Practice, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Mar; 47(2):221-228
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Dementia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
We used register-based data to estimate the effect of all-type dementia on road traffic accidents (RTAs) risk, combined with comorbidities or sedative medicines, among non-institutionalized older people in Denmark.
The source population was all residents in Denmark aged 65 years and older, alive as of January 1, 2008 ( n = 853,228). Cases were those who had any type of RTA in 2009-2014. Each case was matched for age, sex and geographic location to 4-6 controls. All-type dementia was ascertained using the International Classification of Diseases version 10 (ICD-10) diagnosis supplemented with prescribed medicine records. Eight chronic diseases were selected to assess comorbidities. Four types of medicines were categorized as sedative medicines for analysis. Conditional logistic regression with adjustment for education and marital status as well as either the number of comorbidities or sedative medications use was performed using STATA software.
Older people with dementia had lower RTAs risk compared to their controls (odds ratio = 0.43, 95% confidence interval (0.32-0.60), p
PubMed ID
29914317 View in PubMed
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Early intervention for childhood overweight: A randomized trial in general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275257
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):184-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lone Marie Larsen
Niels Thomas Hertel
Christian Mølgaard
René Depont Christensen
Steffen Husby
Dorte Ejg Jarbøl
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):184-90
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Family Practice
Female
General practice
Health education
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - therapy
Program Evaluation
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Weight Reduction Programs
Abstract
To evaluate the effect of two intervention modalities concerning overweight and obesity among children in general practice.
Prospective randomized controlled trial.
A total of 60 general practices in the former County of Funen, Denmark.
Overweight children, identified by International Obesity Task Force criteria, aged 5-9 years.
Model 1 with health consultations in general practice during a two-year period or Model 2, an educational programme for the children and their families in addition to the health consultations.
Change in body mass index (BMI) z-score in order to compare the results, independent of gender- and age-related changes over time.
A total of 80 children were recruited with 35 and 45 children allocated to Model 1 and Model 2, respectively. No significant differences were found in the change in BMI z-score (SDS) between the two groups. A decrease in the mean BMI z-score from baseline to study end of -0.20 (95%CI -0.38 to -0.01) in Model 1 and -0.26 (95%CI -0.44 to -0.09) in Model 2, respectively, was detected. The majority of the participants (2/3) continued in the study for more than one year in both models, with a mean of 12 consultations in general practice.
In this particular setting the two intervention strategies against overweight and obesity did not differ significantly with regard to change in BMI z-scores.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26194172 View in PubMed
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Feasibility of a psychosocial rehabilitation intervention to enhance the involvement of relatives in cancer rehabilitation: pilot study for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112531
Source
Patient. 2013;6(3):201-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Loni Ledderer
Karen la Cour
Ole Mogensen
Erik Jakobsen
René Depont Christensen
Jakob Kragstrup
Helle Ploug Hansen
Author Affiliation
Health, Man and Society, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, J.B.WinsløwsVej 9, 5000, Odense C, Denmark, loni.ledderer@soci.au.dk.
Source
Patient. 2013;6(3):201-12
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Family Relations
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology - rehabilitation
Pilot Projects
Quality of Life
Sickness Impact Profile
Social Support
Abstract
Cancer often affects the quality of life and well-being of patients as well as their relatives. Previous studies have suggested that relatives should be involved in psychosocial rehabilitation to address the needs for an interpersonal relationship with others in the disease trajectory. We developed an innovative rehabilitation program to be offered to the patient and a relative as a pair.
The aim of the present pilot study was to examine the feasibility of the intervention in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) and to evaluate the impact on quality of life.
The study was designed as an RCT comparing the new multimodal psychosocial rehabilitation with the usual services. The intervention comprised three 'supportive talks' and a residential rehabilitation course. From March 2010 to March 2011, participation was offered at the time of diagnosis to patients with lung or gynecological cancer from two departments at Odense University Hospital in Denmark. Questionnaires were used to estimate changes in quality of life (EORTC-QLQ-C30 on global health status) and well-being (WHO-Five Well-Being Index) at baseline and after 2 and 12 months. Information on the participants' views about the rehabilitation intervention was obtained from assessment charts and qualitative interviews.
A total of 209 patients were assessed for eligibility, but only 42 pairs were randomized to the study. The 2-month follow-up was completed by 34 patients and 32 relatives, and 19 patients and 21 relatives completed the 12-month follow-up. A higher dropout rate at the 12-month follow-up was reported in the intervention group compared with controls. Quality of life and well-being increased for patients and relatives in both the intervention and the control group, and no clinically significant difference was observed between the intervention and the control group. Pairs reported that the time of inclusion was inconvenient and that rehabilitation ought to meet their changing needs.
The pilot study showed that it may be difficult to conduct an RCT of a psychosocial rehabilitation intervention for pairs, and difficulties with inclusion and drop out have to be addressed. Interventions need to be carefully developed and tested before evaluating an effect in a large-scale study.
PubMed ID
23821379 View in PubMed
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General practice variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in Denmark: a population-based observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108184
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2013;14:113
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Mette M Koefoed
Jens Søndergaard
René dePont Christensen
Dorte E Jarbøl
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. mkoefoed@health.sdu.dk
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2013;14:113
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Deinstitutionalization
Denmark
Female
General practitioners
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - diagnosis - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Registries
Socioeconomic Factors
Spirometry - utilization
Young Adult
Abstract
Spirometry testing is essential to confirm an obstructive lung disease, but studies have reported that a large proportion of patients diagnosed with COPD or asthma have no history of spirometry testing. Also, it has been shown that many patients are prescribed medication for obstructive lung disease without a relevant diagnosis or spirometry test registered. General practice characteristics have been reported to influence diagnosis and management of several chronic diseases. However, these findings are inconsistent, and it is uncertain whether practice characteristics influence spirometry testing among patients receiving medication for obstructive lung disease. The aim of this study was therefore to examine if practice characteristics are associated with spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease.
A national register-based cohort study was performed. All patients over 18 years receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008 were identified and detailed patient-specific data on sociodemographic status and spirometry tests were extracted. Information on practice characteristics like number of doctors, number of patients per doctor, training practice status, as well as age and gender of the general practitioners was linked to each medication user.
Partnership practices had a higher odds ratio (OR) of performing spirometry compared with single-handed practices (OR 1.24, CI 1.09-1.40). We found a significant association between increasing general practitioner age and decreasing spirometry testing. This tendency was most pronounced among partnership practices, where doctors over 65 years had the lowest odds of spirometry testing (OR 0.25, CI 0.10-0.61). Training practice status was significantly associated with spirometry testing among single-handed practices (OR 1.40, CI 1.10-1.79).
Some of the variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease was associated with practice characteristics. This variation in performance may indicate a potential for quality improvement.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23923987 View in PubMed
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Generic switching and non-persistence among medicine users: a combined population-based questionnaire and register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272598
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(3):e0119688
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jette Rathe
Morten Andersen
Dorte Ejg Jarbøl
René dePont Christensen
Jesper Hallas
Jens Søndergaard
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(3):e0119688
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anticonvulsants - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Denmark
Drug Substitution - statistics & numerical data
Drugs, Generic - therapeutic use
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Therapeutic Equivalency
Young Adult
Abstract
Generic substitution means that one medicinal product is replaced by another product containing the same active substance. It is strictly regulated with respect to its bioequivalence, and all products must have undergone appropriate studies. Although generic substitution is widely implemented, it still remains to be answered how generic switch influences persistence to long-term treatment, and if it is modified by patients' concerns about medicine and views on generic medicine. This study focuses on users of antidepressants and antiepileptics, and their experience of generic switching.
The study was an observational cohort study. By use of a prescription database, we identified patients who had redeemed prescriptions on generically substitutable drugs, and a questionnaire was mailed to them. We analyzed predictors of discontinuation in relation to generic switch and patients' attitudes towards generic medicines and concerns about their medicine.
Patients who experience their first-time switch of a specific drug were at higher risk of non-persistence, Hazard Ratio 2.98, 95% CI (1.81;4.89) versus those who have never switched, and 35.7% became non-persistent during the first year of follow-up. Generic switching did not influence persistence considerably in those having previous experience with generic switching of the specific drug. Stratified analyses on users of antidepressants and antiepileptics underpin the results, showing higher risk of non-persistence for first-time switchers for both drug categories.
In conclusion, patients who are first-time switchers of a specific drug were at higher risk of non-persistence compared to never switchers and those having experienced previous generic switching.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25775472 View in PubMed
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Identification of Associations Between Prescribed Medications and Cancer: A Nationwide Screening Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280829
Source
EBioMedicine. 2016 May;7:73-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Anton Pottegård
Søren Friis
René dePont Christensen
Laurel A Habel
Joshua J Gagne
Jesper Hallas
Source
EBioMedicine. 2016 May;7:73-9
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
We present a systematic screening for identifying associations between prescribed drugs and cancer risk using the high quality Danish nationwide health registries.
We identified all patients (cases) with incident cancer in Denmark during 2000-2012 (n=278,485) and matched each case to 10 controls. Complete prescription histories since 1995 were extracted. Applying a two-phased case-control approach, we first identified drug classes or single drugs associated with an increased or decreased risk of 99 different cancer types, and further evaluated potential associations by examining specificity and dose-response patterns.
22,125 drug-cancer pairs underwent evaluation in the first phase. Of 4561 initial signals (i.e., drug-cancer associations), 3541 (78%) failed to meet requirements for dose-response patterns and specificity, leaving 1020 eligible signals. Of these, 510 signals involved the use of single drugs, and 33% (166 signals) and 67% (344 signals) suggested a reduced or an increased cancer risk, respectively. While a large proportion of the signals were attributable to the underlying conditions being treated, our algorithm successfully identified well-established associations, as well as several new signals that deserve further investigation.
Our results provide the basis for future targeted studies of single associations to capture novel carcinogenic or chemopreventive effects of prescription drugs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27322460 View in PubMed
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Influence of comorbidity on cancer patients' rehabilitation needs, participation in rehabilitation activities and unmet needs: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103013
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2014 Aug;22(8):2095-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Lise Vilstrup Holm
Dorte Gilså Hansen
Jakob Kragstrup
Christoffer Johansen
Rene dePont Christensen
Peter Vedsted
Jens Søndergaard
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Cancer Rehabilitation, Research Unit of General Practice, University of Southern Denmark, JB Winsløws Vej 9A, 5000, Odense C, Denmark, lholm@health.sdu.dk.
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2014 Aug;22(8):2095-105
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Questionnaires
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aims to investigate possible associations between cancer survivors' comorbidity status and their (1) need for rehabilitation, (2) participation in rehabilitation activities and (3) unmet needs for rehabilitation in a 14-month period following date of diagnosis.
We performed a population-based cohort study including incident cancer patients diagnosed from 1 October 2007 to 30 September 2008 in two regions in Denmark. Fourteen months after diagnosis, participants completed a questionnaire measuring different aspects and dimensions of rehabilitation. Individual information on comorbidity was based on hospital contacts from 1994 and until diagnosis, subsequently classified according to the Charlson comorbidity index. Logistic regression analyses were used to explore the association between comorbidity and outcomes for rehabilitation. Analyses were conducted overall and stratified for gender, age and cancer type.
A total of 3,439 patients responded (70%). Comorbidity at all levels was statistically significant associated with a physical rehabilitation need, and moderate to severe comorbidity was statistically significant associated with a need in the emotional, family-oriented and financial areas as well as participation in physical-related rehabilitation activities. Stratified analyses showed that significant results in most cases were related to being older than 65 years or having colorectal or prostate cancer.
Comorbidity at all levels was significantly associated with needs for physical rehabilitation. Moderate to severe comorbidity was further associated with other areas of need and participation in physical area activities. This should be taken into account when planning rehabilitation interventions for cancer survivors. Differences among subgroups could help target interventions and should be explored further.
PubMed ID
24643775 View in PubMed
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Influence of socioeconomic and demographic status on spirometry testing in patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264164
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:580
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Mette M Koefoed
Jens Søndergaard
René dePont Christensen
Dorte E Jarbøl
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:580
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Demography
Denmark
Female
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - drug therapy - physiopathology
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prevalence
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Spirometry - utilization
Abstract
Socioeconomic status is known to influence the prevalence, severity and mortality of obstructive lung diseases, but it is uncertain whether it affects the use of diagnostic spirometry in patients initiating treatment for these conditions. The objective of this paper was to examine a possible association between education, income, labour market affiliation, cohabitation status and having spirometry performed when initiating medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease.
We conducted a population-based cohort study. Danish national registers were linked, retrieving data on prescriptions, spirometry testing, socioeconomic and demographic variables in all first time users of medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008.
A total of 37,734 persons were included and approximately half of the cohort had spirometry performed. Among medication users under 65 years of age, being unemployed was significantly associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed, the strongest association was seen in men (OR = 0.82, CI = 0.73-0.91). Medium income was associated with increased odds of having spirometry performed in men (OR =1.18, CI = 1.06-1.30) and high educational level (>12 years) was associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed in women (OR = 0.86, CI = 0.78-0.94). Cohabitation status was not associated with having spirometry performed. Among medication users over 65 years of age, living alone was associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed among men (OR = 0.78, CI = 0.69-0.88).
Social inequity in spirometry testing among patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease was confirmed in this study. Increased focus on spirometry testing among elderly men living alone, among the unemployed and among women with higher education is required when initiating medication.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23768408 View in PubMed
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