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A 3-year clinical follow-up of adult patients with 3243A>G in mitochondrial DNA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82145
Source
Neurology. 2006 May 23;66(10):1470-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2006
Author
Majamaa-Voltti K A M
Winqvist S.
Remes A M
Tolonen U.
Pyhtinen J.
Uimonen S.
Kärppä M.
Sorri M.
Peuhkurinen K.
Majamaa K.
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. kirsi.majamaa-voltti@oulu.fi
Source
Neurology. 2006 May 23;66(10):1470-5
Date
May-23-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cognition Disorders - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - genetics
Disease Progression
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Electroencephalography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - genetics
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - genetics - ultrasonography
Lactates - blood
MELAS Syndrome - genetics - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mitochondria, Muscle - metabolism
Mosaicism
Neuropsychological Tests
Point Mutation
Pyruvates - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To follow the clinical course of patients with the mitochondrial DNA mutation 3243A>G for 3 years. METHODS: Thirty-three adult patients with the 3243A>G mutation entered a 3-year follow-up study. They were clinically evaluated annually, audiometry was performed, and samples were drawn for the analysis of blood chemistry and mutation heteroplasmy in leukocytes. Holter recording was performed three times during the follow-up and echocardiography, neuropsychological assessment, and quantitative EEG and brain imaging conducted at entry and after 3 years. RESULTS: The incidence of new neurologic events was low during the 3-year follow-up. Sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI) progressed, left ventricular wall thickness increased, mean alpha frequency in the occipital and parietal regions decreased, and the severity of disease index (modified Rankin score) progressed significantly. The rate of SNHI progression correlated with mutation heteroplasmy in muscle. The increase in left ventricular wall thickness was seen almost exclusively in diabetic patients. Seven patients died during the follow-up, and they were generally more severely affected than those who survived. CONCLUSIONS: Significant changes in the severity of disease, sensorineural hearing impairment, left ventricular hypertrophy, and quantitative EEG were seen in adult patients with 3243A>G during the 3-year follow-up.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2007 Jan 9;68(2):163-417210904
PubMed ID
16717204 View in PubMed
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Parkinsonism associated with the homozygous W748S mutation in the POLG1 gene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93507
Source
Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2008 Dec;14(8):652-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Remes A M
Hinttala R.
Kärppä M.
Soini H.
Takalo R.
Uusimaa J.
Majamaa K.
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Oulu, Box 5000, FIN-90014, Oulu, Finland. anne.remes@oulu.fi
Source
Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2008 Dec;14(8):652-4
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cocaine - analogs & derivatives - diagnostic use
DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase - genetics
Humans
Male
Mutation - genetics
Parkinsonian Disorders - genetics - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Radiopharmaceuticals - diagnostic use
Serine - genetics
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon - methods
Tryptophan - genetics
Abstract
Parkinsonism has been described in patients with mutations in POLG1 gene. The W748S mutation is one of the most common mutations in this gene and it has been found to be a frequent cause of autosomal recessive ataxia in adults and the Alpers syndrome in children. We found the W748S mutation in a 65-year-old man with a late-onset syndrome consisting of ataxia, parkinsonism, ophthalmoplegia, peripheral neuropathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. Parkinsonism is one of the phenotypic features associated also with the W748S mutation.
PubMed ID
18321754 View in PubMed
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