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Biodegradation of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater by staged Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBR).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272967
Source
Water Res. 2015 Oct 15;83:293-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2015
Author
Mònica Escolà Casas
Ravi Kumar Chhetri
Gordon Ooi
Kamilla M S Hansen
Klaus Litty
Magnus Christensson
Caroline Kragelund
Henrik R Andersen
Kai Bester
Source
Water Res. 2015 Oct 15;83:293-302
Date
Oct-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Physiological Phenomena
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biofilms - growth & development
Bioreactors
Denmark
Environmental Restoration and Remediation - methods
Hospitals
Pharmaceutical Preparations - metabolism
Pilot Projects
Waste Water - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - metabolism
Abstract
Hospital wastewater represents a significant input of pharmaceuticals into municipal wastewater. As Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBRs) appear to remove organic micro-pollutants, hospital wastewater was treated with a pilot plant consisting of three MBBRs in series. The removal of pharmaceuticals was studied in two experiments: 1) A batch experiment where pharmaceuticals were spiked to each reactor and 2) a continuous flow experiment at native concentrations. DOC removal, nitrification as well as removal of pharmaceuticals (including X-ray contrast media, ß-blockers, analgesics and antibiotics) occurred mainly in the first reactor. In the batch experiment most of the compounds followed a single first-order kinetics degradation function, giving degradation rate constants ranged from 5.77 × 10(-3) to 4.07 h(-1), from -5.53 × 10(-3) to 9.24 × 10(-1) h(-1) and from 1.83 × 10(-3) to 2.42 × 10(-1) h(-1) for first, second and third reactor respectively. Generally, the highest removal rate constants were found in the first reactor while the lowest were found in the third one. This order was inverted for most compounds, when the removal rate constants were normalized to biomass, indicating that the last tank had the most effective biofilms. In the batch experiment, 21 out of 26 compounds were assessed to be degraded with more than 20% within the MBBR train. In the continuous flow experiment the measured removal rates were lower than those estimated from the batch experiments.
PubMed ID
26164801 View in PubMed
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Treatment of Arctic wastewater by chemical coagulation, UV and peracetic acid disinfection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280342
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Feb 16;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2017
Author
Ravi Kumar Chhetri
Ewa Klupsch
Henrik Rasmus Andersen
Pernille Erland Jensen
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Feb 16;
Date
Feb-16-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Conventional wastewater treatment is challenging in the Arctic region due to the cold climate and scattered population. Thus, no wastewater treatment plant exists in Greenland, and raw wastewater is discharged directly to nearby waterbodies without treatment. We investigated the efficiency of physicochemical wastewater treatment, in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. Raw wastewater from Kangerlussuaq was treated by chemical coagulation and UV disinfection. By applying 7.5 mg Al/L polyaluminium chloride (PAX XL100), 73% of turbidity and 28% phosphate was removed from raw wastewater. E. coli and Enterococcus were removed by 4 and 2.5 log, respectively, when UV irradiation of 0.70 kWh/m(3) was applied to coagulated wastewater. Furthermore, coagulated raw wastewater in Denmark, which has a chemical quality similar to Greenlandic wastewater, was disinfected by peracetic acid or UV irradiation. Removal of heterotrophic bacteria by applying 6 and 12 mg/L peracetic acid was 2.8 and 3.1 log, respectively. Similarly, removal of heterotrophic bacteria by applying 0.21 and 2.10 kWh/m(3) for UV irradiation was 2.1 and greater than 4 log, respectively. Physicochemical treatment of raw wastewater followed by UV irradiation and/or peracetic acid disinfection showed the potential for treatment of arctic wastewater.
PubMed ID
28210951 View in PubMed
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Treatment of Arctic wastewater by chemical coagulation, UV and peracetic acid disinfection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297769
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32851-32859
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Ravi Kumar Chhetri
Ewa Klupsch
Henrik Rasmus Andersen
Pernille Erland Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Bygningstorvet, Building 115, 2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32851-32859
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - drug effects - radiation effects
Denmark
Disinfectants - chemistry - pharmacology
Disinfection - methods
Enterococcus - drug effects - radiation effects
Escherichia coli - drug effects - radiation effects
Greenland
Heterotrophic Processes
Peracetic Acid - chemistry - pharmacology
Ultraviolet Rays
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
Conventional wastewater treatment is challenging in the Arctic region due to the cold climate and scattered population. Thus, no wastewater treatment plant exists in Greenland, and raw wastewater is discharged directly to nearby waterbodies without treatment. We investigated the efficiency of physicochemical wastewater treatment, in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. Raw wastewater from Kangerlussuaq was treated by chemical coagulation and UV disinfection. By applying 7.5 mg Al/L polyaluminium chloride (PAX XL100), 73% of turbidity and 28% phosphate was removed from raw wastewater. E. coli and Enterococcus were removed by 4 and 2.5 log, respectively, when UV irradiation of 0.70 kWh/m3 was applied to coagulated wastewater. Furthermore, coagulated raw wastewater in Denmark, which has a chemical quality similar to Greenlandic wastewater, was disinfected by peracetic acid or UV irradiation. Removal of heterotrophic bacteria by applying 6 and 12 mg/L peracetic acid was 2.8 and 3.1 log, respectively. Similarly, removal of heterotrophic bacteria by applying 0.21 and 2.10 kWh/m3 for UV irradiation was 2.1 and greater than 4 log, respectively. Physicochemical treatment of raw wastewater followed by UV irradiation and/or peracetic acid disinfection showed the potential for treatment of arctic wastewater.
PubMed ID
28210951 View in PubMed
Less detail