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21 records – page 1 of 3.

Alveolar hydatid disease of the liver: rationale and technics of surgical treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2623
Source
Annals of Surgery. 157(4):548-559.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
  1 website  
Author
West, J.T.
Hillman, F.J.
Rausch, R.L.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Indian Health Service
Source
Annals of Surgery. 157(4):548-559.
Date
1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Point Hope
Kotzebue
Savoonga
Gambell
Nome
Alveolar hydatid disease
Echinococcus multilocularis
Zoonosis
Surgery
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2084.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 936.
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A clinical trial of mebendazole in the treatment of alveolar hydatid disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2668
Source
American Review of Respiratory Disease. 1978 Oct: 118(4):747-757.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
Wilson, J.F.
Davidson, M.
Rausch, R.L.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Indian Health Service
Source
American Review of Respiratory Disease. 1978 Oct: 118(4):747-757.
Date
1978
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alveolar hydatid disease
Echinococcus multilocularis
Zoonosis
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Benzimidazoles - therapeutic use
Drug Evaluation
Echinococcosis, Hepatic - drug therapy - immunology - radiography
Echinococcosis, Pulmonary - drug therapy - immunology - radiography
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Inuits
Liver Abscess - surgery
Male
Mebendazole - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Suction
Abstract
In July 1974, mebendazole was reported to be effective against the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus in experimentally infected mice. A clinical trial of mebendazole was initiated in December 1974 in 4 patients with far advanced, nonresectable lesions caused by Echinococcus multilocularis. A daily dose of 40 mg of the drug per kg of body weight was administered to the 4 patients for more than 3 years. No evidence of toxicity or adverse reactions has been observed. Detectable plasma mebendazole concentrations were achieved with high-dose mebendazole therapy. Serum concentrations of IgE increased and decreased early in therapy. There was no evidence that the larval cestode was killed. The metastatic lesions appeared to be stabilized or diminished, and over-all clinical results were encouraging. Progressively enlarging thoracic metastases in 2 patients regressed during therapy, and symptomatic improvement was observed in all 4 patients. Mebendazole, a highly effective antihelmintic in enteric infections, is poorly absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract. Resulting low serum concentrations limit treatment of the massive, scirrhous lesions characteristic of E. multilocularis infections. Nevertheless, encouraging clinical responses observed with mebendazole therapy suggest that a more soluble form of this or a related drug might prove highly effective in the medical management of hydatid disease in humans.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2087.
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Current status of alveolar hydatid disease in northern regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2044
Source
Pages 245-247 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
  1 document  
Author
Rausch, R.L.
Wilson, J.F.
Author Affiliation
University of Washington
Source
Pages 245-247 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Date
1985
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alveolar hydatid disease
Echinococcus multilocularis
Mebendazole
Surgery
Zoonosis
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2078.
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The ecology of Echinococcus multilocularis (Cestoda : Taeniidae) on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. II. — Helminth populations in the definitive host

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293162
Source
Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparee 1990, 65 : n° 3, 131–140
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
  1 website  
Author
Rausch, R.L.
Fay, F.H.
Williamson, F.S.L.
Source
Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparee 1990, 65 : n° 3, 131–140
Date
1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The helminths of 1,579 arctic foxes from St. Lawrence Island were investigated by standard methods. The foxes, obtained mainly during the winter from fur trappers, harbored 22 species of helminths. Four of those were trematodes, viz., Maritrema afanassjewi Belopol’skaia, 1952, Orthosplanchnus pygmaeus Iurakhno, 1967, Plagiorchis elegans (Rudolphi, 1802) and Alaria marcianae (LaRue, 1917), each of which occurred in a single host. Two species of cestodes, Diphyllobothrium dendriticum (Nitzsch, 1824) and Mesocestoides kirbyi Chandler, 1940, were uncommon (in 2.7 and 1.3 % of the foxes, respectively). Taenia polyacantha Leuckart, 1856 and Echinococcus multilocularis Leuckart, 1863 were present in about 80 % of the foxes, and Taenia crassiceps (Zeder, 1800) in less than 10 %. The specimens of Taenia spp. from the autumn-winter sample were usually destrobilate. In about 2 % of the foxes, acanthocephalans of six species occurred. Four of those, of the genus Corynosoma Lühe, 1904, were common in marine mammals of the region ; a fifth, Corynosoma clavatum Goss, 1940, has been reported previously only from marine birds of the Southern Hemisphere ; and the sixth, Polymorphus cf. minutus (Goeze, 1782), has been found widely in waterfowl of the Northern Hemisphere. Of the nematodes, Sobolophyme baturini Petrov, 1930, Cylicospirura felineus (Chandler, 1925), and Physaloptera sp. were rare (with each in only one to three foxes). Trichinella nativa Boev et Britov, 1972 and Crenosoma vulpis (Dujardin, 1844) were uncommon (1.5 and 4 %, respectively). The nematodes most often present were Toxascaris leonina (von Linstow, 1902) (89 %) and Uncinaria stenocephala (Railliet, 1884) (40 %). Several of the rare to uncommon helminths probably were transported to the island by foxes immigrating from the adjacent continents via the pack ice.
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Field investigations of prophylaxis against epizootic distemper in Arctic sled dogs

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292412
Publication Type
Article

Field investigations of prophylaxis against epizootic distemper in Arctic sled dogs

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292536
Source
"Proceedings Book" American Veterinary Medical Association, Ninety-Second Annual Meeting, Aug 15-18, 1955. 223-227
Publication Type
Article
Date
1955
Author
Reinhard, K.R.
Rausch, R.L.
Gray, R.L.
Source
"Proceedings Book" American Veterinary Medical Association, Ninety-Second Annual Meeting, Aug 15-18, 1955. 223-227
Date
1955
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Notes
Alaska Medical Library Office accession no. 292536
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Helminths in Eskimos in western Alaska, with particular reference to Diphyllobothrium infection and anaemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2039
Source
Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 61(3):351-357.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1967
Author
Rausch, R.L.
E.M. Scott
Rausch, V.R.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 61(3):351-357.
Date
1967
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Hooper Bay
Diphyllobothrium spp.
Fish tapeworm
Anemia
Zoonosis
Diet, traditional
Abstract
An investigation of a possible relationship between Diphyllobothrium (fish tapeworm) infection and microcytic anaemia among Eskimos was carried out during 1957–1958 at the village of Hooper Bay in western Alaska. Such infections did not contribute to anaemia in residents of this region, a finding in agreement with those of TÖTTERMAN 1947 in Finland. Species of diphyllobothriid cestodes recorded from the lower Kuskokwim River region are listed, and other helminths recorded from man in this area are briefly discussed. Schistocephalus solidus (Mueller 1776) is reported from man, apparently for the first time.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2118.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 940.
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Notes on Pasteurella tularensis isolated from a vole, Microtus oeconomus Pallas, in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2041
Source
Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 15(1):47-55.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969
Author
Rausch, R.L.
Huntley, B.E.
Bridgens, J.G.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 15(1):47-55.
Date
1969
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Culture Media
Francisella tularensis
Growth & development
Immunology
Isolation & purification
Pathogenicity
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Kidney
Pathology
Liver
Lung
Rabbits
Rodent Diseases
Microbiology
Rodentia Sciuridae
Ticks
Tularemia
Virulence
Abstract
In October, 1963, during a time of abundance of microtine rodents, Pasteurella tularensis was isolated from a northern vole, Microtus oeconomus Pallas, at the Ugashik Lakes on the upper Alaska Peninsula. The morphological, cultural, and serological characteristics of this isolate are described, and comparative virulence in experimentally inoculated animals, including series of indigenous rodents, is discussed. The isolate was less virulent for rabbits and guinea pigs than was that which has been isolated previously from ticks, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard), in Alaska, and was also less virulent for these animals than was strain SCHU S4. The isolate from the vole seemed to resemble most closely the Eurasian strain of P. tularensis, as might be expected on zoogeographical grounds. A distinguishing feature of the isolate was its ability to grow readily on blood agar in the absence of cystine. The relatively high rate of subclinical tularemia in man in northern and western Alaska, as indicated by the results of serological tests, may be attributable to this organism. Water-borne bacteria may be the source of infection in man.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1881.
PubMed ID
5765177 View in PubMed
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Observations on some natural-focal zoonoses in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2027
Source
Archives of Environmental Health. 25:246-252.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1972
Author
Rausch, R.L.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Archives of Environmental Health. 25:246-252.
Date
1972
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Zoonosis
Rabies
Brucellosis
Brucella spp.
Tularemia
Francisella tularensis
Echinococcus multilocularis
Alaska
Animals
Arbovirus Infections - epidemiology - veterinary
Brucellosis - veterinary
Carnivora
Disease Vectors
Dogs
Echinococcosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - veterinary
Foxes
Humans
Infant
Rabbits
Rabies - microbiology - veterinary
Rabies virus - isolation & purification
Reindeer
Rodent Diseases
Rodentia
Seasons
Tularemia - veterinary
Zoonoses - epidemiology
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1694.
PubMed ID
5055675 View in PubMed
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On the biology and systematic position of Microtus abbreviatus Miller, a vole endemic to the St. Matthew Islands, Bering Sea

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293156
Source
Zeitschrift fur Saugetierkunde 1968 Vol.33 No.2 pp.65-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968
Author
Rausch, R.L.
Rausch, V.R.
Source
Zeitschrift fur Saugetierkunde 1968 Vol.33 No.2 pp.65-99
Date
1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Microtus
Voles
Parasitic worms
Bering Sea
Abstract
In a general survey of the biology of Microtusabbreviatus on the St. Matthew Islands, Bering Sea, the helminth fauna was found to include only species regularly found in Microtus spp. at higher latitudes. Those recorded are listed with their rates of incidence and some information is given on their general biology.
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21 records – page 1 of 3.