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From benzos to berries: treatment offered at an Aboriginal youth solvent abuse treatment centre relays the importance of culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101843
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):75-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Colleen Anne Dell
Maureen Seguin
Carol Hopkins
Raymond Tempier
Lewis Mehl-Madrona
Debra Dell
Randy Duncan
Karen Mosier
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. colleen.dell@usask.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):75-83
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Culture
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Male
Medicine, Traditional - psychology
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Mental health
Solvents
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Abstract
First Nations and Inuit youth who abuse solvents are one of the most highly stigmatized substance-abusing groups in Canada. Drawing on a residential treatment response that is grounded in a culture-based model of resiliency, this article discusses the cultural implications for psychiatry's individualized approach to treating mental disorders. A systematic review of articles published in The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry during the past decade, augmented with a review of Canadian and international literature, revealed a gap in understanding and practice between Western psychiatric disorder-based and Aboriginal culture-based approaches to treatment and healing from substance abuse and mental disorders. Differing conceptualizations of mental health and substance abuse are discussed from Western psychiatric and Aboriginal worldviews, with a focus on connection to self, community, and political context. Applying an Aboriginal method of knowledge translation-storytelling-experiences from front-line workers in a youth solvent abuse treatment centre relay the difficulties with applying Western responses to Aboriginal healing. This lends to a discussion of how psychiatry can capitalize on the growing debate regarding the role of culture in the treatment of Aboriginal youth who abuse solvents. There is significant need for culturally competent psychiatric research specific to diagnosing and treating First Nations and Inuit youth who abuse substances, including solvents. Such understanding for front-line psychiatrists is necessary to improve practice. A health promotion perspective may be a valuable beginning point for attaining this understanding, as it situates psychiatry's approach to treating mental disorders within the etiology for Aboriginal Peoples.
Notes
RefSource: Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;56(2):73-4
PubMed ID
21333034 View in PubMed
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The impact of stigma of mental illness in a Canadian community: a survey of patients experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129909
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2013 Feb;49(1):127-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Ashley Oleniuk
C Randy Duncan
Raymond Tempier
Author Affiliation
College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2013 Feb;49(1):127-32
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Female
Health Surveys
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inpatients
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Sickness Impact Profile
Social Stigma
Socioeconomic Factors
Stereotyping
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined stigma experiences and its impact among patients (n = 41) hospitalized for mental illness. We studied their characteristics contributing to the expectation, intensity, and frequency of stigma they could experience. Opinions were compared on the Experiences with the Stigma of Mental Illness scale measuring stigma experiences and impact. There were differences on perceived stigma in: being 19 years or younger at first symptom or treatment, having had one previous psychiatric hospitalizations and having attended one or more outpatient sessions. Those having attended outpatient sessions, being previously hospitalized or younger suffered more impact.
PubMed ID
22052428 View in PubMed
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Patient-centered care in affective, non-affective, and schizoaffective groups: patients' opinions and attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143493
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2010 Oct;46(5):452-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Raymond Tempier
Shelanne L Hepp
C Randy Duncan
Betty Rohr
Krystal Hachey
Karen Mosier
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. raymond.tempier@usask.ca
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2010 Oct;46(5):452-60
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Canada
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - diagnosis - drug therapy
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Quality of Health Care
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
An outcome evaluation was conducted to obtain psychiatric inpatients' perspectives on acute care mental health treatment and services. The applicability of diagnostic categories based on affective, non-affective, and schizoaffective disorder were considered in the predictability of responses to treatment regimens and the related services provided in an inpatient psychiatric unit. A multidimensional approach was used to survey patients, which included the DAI-30, the BMQ, the SERVQUAL, and the CSQ-8. Overall, findings indicate that inpatient satisfaction could be improved with tailoring treatment to suit their respective symptoms. Furthermore, this exploratory study demonstrates some preliminary support for the inclusion of patients with a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder as a separate group toward improving acute mental health care while hospitalized.
PubMed ID
20480394 View in PubMed
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Psychological distress among female spouses of male at-risk drinkers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166157
Source
Alcohol. 2006 Aug;40(1):41-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Raymond Tempier
Richard Boyer
Jean Lambert
Karen Mosier
C Randy Duncan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan, Royal University Hospital, 103 Hospital Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, S7N 0W8. raymond.tempier@usask.ca
Source
Alcohol. 2006 Aug;40(1):41-9
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Employment
Family Characteristics
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The consequences of alcoholism on the mental health of spouses of lifetime at-risk drinkers are only known from studies on alcoholics already in treatment. A retrospective analysis was conducted using data from a Quebec community health survey. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, our goal was to ascertain the mental health of female spouses living with a male lifetime at-risk drinker. Secondly, we wanted to examine the relationship between male lifetime at-risk drinkers (aged 30-54 years) and the psychological distress of their nondrinking female spouses. Lifetime at-risk drinking, for the purposes of this study, was defined as having at least two positive answers to the CAGE questionnaire. Couples wherein both spouses were deemed not at-risk for problem drinking by the CAGE instrument (0 or 1 positive answer) formed the control group. Psychological distress was measured using the Indice de Détresse Psychologique de l'Enquête Santé Québec (Préville, M., Boyer, R., Potvin, L., Perreault, C., & Légaré, G. (1992). La détresse psychologique: détermination de la fiabilité et de la validité de la mesure utilisée dans l'enquête Santé Québec. Cahier de recherches #7, Montréal, Santé Québec.). It measures symptoms of anxiety, depression, aggressivity, and cognitive impairments. Scores of >or=22 (out of 100) were indicative of a high level of psychological distress. This study confirmed higher levels of psychological distress in female spouses of male lifetime at-risk drinkers in the general population. An exploratory study examined the association between the psychological distress of female spouses and each of the following nine independent variables: male partner lifetime at-risk drinker, stressful life events, job situation, socioeconomic status, perceived health status, presence of children less than 15 years, length of the marital relationship, presence of a confidant, and availability of social support. Lifetime at-risk drinking is a risk factor for the spouse's psychological distress. An examination of the demographic characteristics related to alcohol intake in male lifetime at-risk drinkers is also described in this study.
PubMed ID
17157719 View in PubMed
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