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Consumption of added fats and oils in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) centres across 10 European countries as assessed by 24-hour dietary recalls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18552
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1227-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
J. Linseisen
E. Bergström
L. Gafá
C A González
A. Thiébaut
A. Trichopoulou
R. Tumino
C. Navarro Sánchez
C. Martínez Garcia
I. Mattisson
S. Nilsson
A. Welch
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
E. Kesse
A B Miller
M. Schulz
K. Botsi
A. Naska
S. Sieri
C. Sacerdote
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
G. Skeie
D. Engeset
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Unit of Human Nutrition and Cancer Prevention, Technical University of Munich, Alte Akademie 16, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany. j.linseisen@wzw.tum.de
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1227-42
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Educational Status
Energy intake
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the consumption of added fats and oils across the European centres and countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN AND SETTING: 24-Hour dietary recalls were collected by means of standardised computer-guided interviews in 27 redefined EPIC centres across 10 European countries. SUBJECTS: From an initial number of 36 900 subjects, single dietary recalls from 22 924 women and 13 031 men in the age range of 35-74 years were included. RESULTS: Mean daily intake of added fats and oils varied between 16.2 g (Varese, Italy) and 41.1 g (Malmö, Sweden) in women and between 24.7 g (Ragusa, Italy) and 66.0 g (Potsdam, Germany) in men. Total mean lipid intake by consumption of added fats and oils, including those used for sauce preparation, ranged between 18.3 (Norway) and 37.2 g day-1 (Greece) in women and 28.4 (Heidelberg, Germany) and 51.2 g day-1 (Greece) in men. The Mediterranean EPIC centres with high olive oil consumption combined with low animal fat intake contrasted with the central and northern European centres where fewer vegetable oils, more animal fats and a high proportion of margarine were consumed. The consumption of added fats and oils of animal origin was highest in the German EPIC centres, followed by the French. The contribution of added fats and oils to total energy intake ranged from 8% in Norway to 22% in Greece. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate a high variation in dietary intake of added fats and oils in EPIC, providing a good opportunity to elucidate the role of dietary fats in cancer aetiology.
PubMed ID
12639229 View in PubMed
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Variability of fish consumption within the 10 European countries participating in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18550
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1273-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
A A Welch
E. Lund
P. Amiano
M. Dorronsoro
M. Brustad
M. Kumle
M. Rodriguez
C. Lasheras
L. Janzon
J. Jansson
R. Luben
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
K. Klipstein-Grobusch
V. Benetou
X. Zavitsanos
R. Tumino
R. Galasso
H B Bueno-De-Mesquita
M C Ocké
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Strangeways Research Laboratory, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Wort's Causeway, UK. ailsa.welch@srl.cam.ac.uk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1273-85
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Crustacea
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Fishes
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shellfish
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare the consumption of total fish (marine foods) and the fish sub-groups - white fish, fatty fish, very fatty fish, fish products and crustacea, in participants from the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of dietary intake using a computerised standardised 24-hour recall interview. Crude means, means and standard errors adjusted by age, season and day of the week were calculated, stratified by centre and gender. SETTING: Twenty-seven redefined centres in the 10 European countries participating in the EPIC study. SUBJECTS: In total, 35 955 subjects (13 031 men and 22 924 women), aged 35-74 years, selected from the main EPIC cohort. RESULTS: A six- to sevenfold variation in total fish consumption exists in women and men, between the lowest consumption in Germany and the highest in Spain. Overall, white fish represented 49% and 45% of the intake of total fish in women and men, respectively, with the greatest consumption in centres in Spain and Greece and the least in the German and Dutch centres. Consumption of fatty fish reflected that of total fish. However, the greatest intake of very fatty fish was in the coastal areas of northern Europe (Denmark, Sweden and Norway) and in Germany. Consumption of fish products was greater in northern than in southern Europe, with white fish products predominating in centres in France, Italy, Spain, The Netherlands and Norway. Intake of roe and roe products was low. The highest consumption of crustacea was found in the French, Spanish and Italian centres. The number of fish types consumed was greater in southern than in northern Europe. The greatest variability in consumption by day of the week was found in the countries with the lowest fish intake. CONCLUSIONS: Throughout Europe, substantial geographic variation exists in total fish intake, fish sub-groups and the number of types consumed. Day-to-day variability in consumption is also high.
PubMed ID
12639232 View in PubMed
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