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[AntibioticScout: Online tool for antimicrobial stewardship in veterinary medicine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281856
Source
Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd. 2016 Dec;158(12):805-810
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
R. Peter
C. Müntener
D. Demuth
D. Heim
M. Mevissen
G. Schüpbach-Regula
S. Schuller
F. Stucki
B. Willi
H. Naegeli
Source
Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd. 2016 Dec;158(12):805-810
Date
Dec-2016
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Cat Diseases - drug therapy - microbiology
Cats
Communicable Diseases - drug therapy
Decision Support Techniques
Dog Diseases - drug therapy - microbiology
Dogs
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Horse Diseases - drug therapy - microbiology
Horses
Humans
Online Systems
Abstract
Resistances to antimicrobials pose serious public health challenges. This issue concerns both human and veterinary medicine and can only be solved by a multidisciplinary approach. A comprehensive concept is, therefore, being worked out within the StAR (strategy antibiotic resistance) program in order to preserve the effectiveness of antibiotics for humans as well as animals. In this context, the AntibioticScout (www.AntibioticScout. ch) offers a new online tool for the prudent use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine. By involving all stakeholders, the guidelines included in the AntibioticScout will result in a nationwide accepted standard for the treatment of bacterial infections in animals. An additional system for the rapid reporting of cases of suspected lack of efficacy of antimicrobials is integrated to allow early detection of emerging resistance and the immediate launch of risk mitigation measures. A first version of the AntibioticScout for the treatment of dogs, cats and horses is available by the end of 2016. All stakeholders are now invited to contribute to the development of the AntibioticScout decision support.
PubMed ID
27934622 View in PubMed
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High effort, low reward, and cardiovascular risk factors in employed Swedish men and women: baseline results from the WOLF Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49992
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Sep;52(9):540-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
R. Peter
L. Alfredsson
N. Hammar
J. Siegrist
T. Theorell
P. Westerholm
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Sociology, University of Düsseldorf, Germany.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Sep;52(9):540-7
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reward
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between measures of work stress (that is, the combination of high effort and low reward) and cardiovascular risk factors. DESIGN: Cross sectional first screening of a prospective cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The study was conducted among 5720 healthy employed men and women living in the greater Stockholm area aged 19-70 years. All analyses were restricted to subjects with complete data (n = 4958). The investigation of associations between indicators of effort-reward imbalance and cardiovascular risk factors was restricted to the age group 30-55 years (n = 3427). MAIN RESULTS: Subjects reporting high effort and low reward at work had a higher prevalence of well known risk factors for coronary heart disease. After adjustment for relevant confounders, associations between a measure of extrinsic effort and reward (the effort-reward ratio) and hypertension (multivariate prevalence odds ratio (POR) 1.62-1.68), increased total cholesterol (upper tertile 220 mg/dl)(POR = 1.24) and the total cholesterol/high density lipoprotein(HDL)-cholesterol ratio (upper tertile 4.61)(POR 1.26-1.30) were found among men. Among women a measure of high intrinsic effort (immersion) was related to increased low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (upper tertile 130 mg/dl)(POR 1.37-1.39). Analyses of variance showed increasing mean values of LDL cholesterol with an increasing degree of the effort-reward ratio among men and increased LDL-cholesterol among women with high levels of intrinsic effort (upper tertile of immersion). CONCLUSIONS: Findings lend support to the hypothesis that effort-reward imbalance represents a specific constellation of stressful experience at work related to cardiovascular risk. The relation was not explained by relevant confounders (for example, lack of physical exercise, body weight, cigarette smoking).
PubMed ID
10320854 View in PubMed
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Impact of clinical osteoarthritis of the hip, knee and hand on self-rated health in six European countries: the European Project on OSteoArthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280301
Source
Qual Life Res. 2016 06;25(6):1423-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
06-2016
Author
N M van Schoor
S. Zambon
M V Castell
C. Cooper
M. Denkinger
E M Dennison
M H Edwards
F. Herbolsheimer
S. Maggi
M. Sánchez-Martinez
N L Pedersen
R. Peter
L A Schaap
J J M Rijnhart
S. van der Pas
D J H Deeg
Source
Qual Life Res. 2016 06;25(6):1423-32
Date
06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Germany
Hand - physiopathology
Health status
Humans
Italy
Male
Netherlands
Osteoarthritis - physiopathology
Osteoarthritis, Hip - physiopathology
Osteoarthritis, Knee - physiopathology
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Self Report
Sickness Impact Profile
Spain
Sweden
United Kingdom
Abstract
Osteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to be associated with decreased physical function, which may impact upon a person's self-rated health (SRH). Only a few studies have examined the association between OA and SRH in the general population, but to date none have used a clinical definition of OA. The objectives are: (1) To examine the cross-sectional association between clinical OA and fair-to-poor SRH in the general population; (2) To examine whether this association differs between countries; (3) To examine whether physical function is a mediator in the association between clinical OA and SRH.
Baseline data of the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA) were used, which includes pre-harmonized data from six European cohort studies (n = 2709). Clinical OA was defined according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria. SRH was assessed using one question: How is your health in general? Physical function was assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA Index and Australian/Canadian OA Hand Index.
The prevalence of fair-to-poor SRH ranged from 19.8 % in the United Kingdom to 63.5 % in Italy. Although country differences in the strength of the associations were observed, clinical OA of the hip, knee and hand were significantly associated with fair-to-poor SRH in five out of six European countries. In most countries and at most sites, the association between clinical OA and fair-to-poor SRH was partly or fully mediated by physical function.
Clinical OA at different sites was related to fair-to-poor SRH in the general population. Most associations were (partly) mediated by physical functioning, indicating that deteriorating physical function in patients with OA should be a point of attention in patient care.
PubMed ID
26547441 View in PubMed
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Pediatric patients receiving palliative care in Canada: results of a multicenter review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163184
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Jun;161(6):597-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Kimberley Widger
Dawn Davies
Danielle J Drouin
Laura Beaune
Lysanne Daoust
R Peter Farran
Nago Humbert
Filomena Nalewajek
Marion Rattray
Maria Rugg
Michelle Bishop
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Palliative Care, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia. kim.widger@utoronto.ca
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Jun;161(6):597-602
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Congenital Abnormalities - mortality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Infant
Neoplasms - mortality
Nervous System Diseases - mortality
Palliative Care - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To describe the patients who received care from the 8 dedicated pediatric palliative care programs in Canada in 2002 and to estimate the number of children who may have benefited but did not receive services from these programs.
Retrospective review of medical records combined with a survey of each program.
Seven pediatric palliative care programs based in tertiary care settings and 1 freestanding children's hospice.
The programs cared for 317 children during 2002, of whom 123 died during that year. An additional 32 children died by the end of 2003.
Pediatric palliative care program.
Nearly half (48.6%) of the patients were younger than 5 years, and almost half of these were younger than 1 year. Primary diagnoses were disorders of the nervous system (39.1%), malignancies (22.1%), and conditions arising in the perinatal period or congenital anomalies (22.1%). Most of the children (43.9%) died at home, with those centers reporting more comprehensive home care services having the highest percentage of home deaths. From a national perspective, between 5% and 12% of the children who could benefit from palliative care received services from 1 of these programs.
Pediatric palliative care programs in Canada care for a diverse population of patients with a wide range of age and disease conditions. Only a small percentage of children who die, however, receive services from these dedicated programs.
PubMed ID
17548766 View in PubMed
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